In the Media

New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, July 25, 2016

Shonali Burke Consulting

Proper measurement can take your campaigns to the next level. Get inspired as we take a look at some awesome measurement case studies in this week's roundup.

Measuring the Effectiveness of News Releases — A Case Study

Why: "To compare the two news releases we considered a range of metrics, including the number of confirmed postings, the number of release views, and the number of tweets about each one. But we rejected those, as we consider them outputs, not outcomes," says Greg Jarboe in this Rutgers Business School case study from The Measurement Advisor.



YAHOO Finance
Doylestown, PA
Thursday, July 21, 2016

YAHOO Finance

Peter Marchesini, Chief Operating Officer of Alamo Pharma Services®, participated in CBI's Second Annual Life Sciences Product Launch Summit in Philadelphia. The "Ask the Experts" topic was titled "Learn from Recent Pitfalls to Prepare for Future Product Launches." They thoroughly analyzed recent product launches and discussed the most common and detrimental difficulties anticipated when trying to launch a product and how to possibly avoid them.

This summit was attended by more than 50 leaders in life sciences companies. The goal of CBI's summit was to provide the product launch market with leading-edge, actionable information on the most compelling industry mega and micro trends through exclusive thought leadership presentations from their well-respected speaking faculty and government officials.

"We were honored to be included in this prestigious summit as CBI is known for creating compelling content and personal connections within the Life Science industry," says Marchesini.

Marchesini's expertise is further enhanced by his role on the faculty at Rutgers Business School, co-teaching the course, Managing the Pharmaceutical Sales Organization, which is a core course of the Pharmaceutical MBA program.

Full Article



YAHOO Finance
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 20, 2016

YAHOO Finance

If you are going to use active investment managers you may want to limit yourself to those who are both truly active and, crucially, unusually patient.

A recent study shows that funds which deviate substantially from the indices they track and which have average holding periods of more than two years perform exceptionally well, outperforming, on average, by two percentage points per year.

What's more, that subset of actively managed portfolios was the only one to so outperform, according to the study, by Martijn Cremers of the University of Notre Dame and Ankur Pareek of Rutgers Business School.

The important distinctions here are two; how high is the "active share" of a portfolio and how long does it tend to hold its investments.

The study looked at mutual funds and institutional portfolios and sorted them by both active share and average holding period.

"Our results suggest that U.S. equity markets provide opportunities for longer-term active managers, perhaps because of the limited arbitrage capital devoted to patient and active investment strategies," Cremers and Pareek write. (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2498743)

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Tuesday, July 19, 2016

News India Times

Rutgers Business School in New Jersey is naming a classroom at the University after a popular Indian-American professor of finance and economics, Farrokh Langdana.

Langdana, a B.Tech graduate in civil engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, and Robert Campbell, a 1962 MBA from Rutgers are being honored with the naming of classrooms after them.

The classroom namings – the first in Rutgers Business School’s history – are part of a new and continuing initiative by Dean Lei Lei to recognize faculty and alumni of uncommon distinction.

Full Article



Cambridge, MA
Sunday, July 17, 2016

Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation

Zhaodon (Ken) Zhong is Associate Professor of Finance at Rutgers Business School. This post is based on an article authored by Professor Zhong and Y.C. Loon, Financial Economist at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

In our article, Does Dodd-Frank Affect OTC Transaction Costs and Liquidity? Evidence from Real-Time CDS Trade Reports, recently published in the Journal of Financial Economics, we use real-time trade reports made available by post-financial crisis reforms to examine the trading costs and liquidity of index credit default swaps (CDSs), an important class of OTC derivatives. More importantly, the richness of the disseminated trade reports allows us to analyze how different aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act's regulatory reforms are changing the landscape and thus, the liquidity of the once opaque OTC derivatives market.

Full HLS Forum post

The full paper by Zhong and Loon is available for download here.



Vineland, NJ
Sunday, July 17, 2016

The Daily Journal

The Landis Sewerage Authority in Vineland, NJ, hosted visitors from Africa on July 11 through the Rutgers Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders program. The visitors were interested in inspecting and learning about the LSA energy production facilities.

The LSA has placed into service a receiving station to accept liquid food waste, cooking fats, oils and grease, which then passes through a grinder, is mixed and heated, and pumped into a digester. It's then broken down biologically to make methane gas, which is used to produce electricity and hot water. The liquid remaining after heat treatment and digestion contains valuable nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus, and is utilized on the LSA farm to grow corn, hay and straw as well as small grains like wheat and rye.

Kevin Lyons, a faculty member at Rutgers Business School and associate director of the Rutgers Energy Institute and the Rutgers EcoComplex, requested the tour. The Rutgers Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders is the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative, which empowers young people through academic coursework, leadership training and networking.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Real Estate Weekly

The Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School announced the roster of its 2016 Advisory Board members.

Comprised of the top real estate professionals in New Jersey, Advisory Board members serve as a conduit of information, knowledge and best practices, fostering productive discussion among students, industry peers, government and academia.

The Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School is predicated on its ability to bring together the real estate industry's brightest and most influential executives to interact with students and to set the academic course for the Center.

"The industry response to what we are doing at the Center has been exciting. So many of our members are dedicating their time and resources to help us achieve our goal of being the top real estate program in the nation, and our roster of the industry's top minds continues to grow," said Morris A. Davis, the Paul V. Profeta Chair and Academic Director of the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Legal Theory Blog

Merritt B. Fox, Ronald J. Gilson and Darius Palia (Columbia University - Law School, Stanford Law School and Rutgers Business School) have posted Corporate Governance Changes as Signal: Contextualizing the Performance Link on Social Science Research Network. Here is the abstract:

Promoting "good" corporate governance has become an important concern. One result has been the creation of indexes that purport to measure the quality of a firm's corporate governance structure. Prior scholarship reports a positive relationship between firms with good corporate governance index ratings and stock-price-based measures of a firm's ability to create share value, such as Tobin’s Q.

Little work, however, explores why we observe this relationship.

We hypothesize one reason for the relationship is that a rating-altering change in corporate governance structure can be a signal concerning the quality of a firm's management.

Legal Theory Blog
Corporate Governance Changes as Signal: Contextualizing the Performance



New York City, N.Y.
Tuesday, July 12, 2016

When Allison Bonner was wrapping up her senior year at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill in 2013, she desired business skills to round out her resume and supplement her double major in classical music and communications.

The 25-year-old, who now works in human resources, turned to UNC's self-paced Business Essentials online certificate program to learn the subject without having to pursue a full MBA – a step she wasn't ready for at that point, she says.

Bonner isn't alone, as business certificates, in some cases referred to as "mini MBAs," become increasingly popular in online education. Experts say the trend is no surprise given that smaller credentials – ranging from digital badges to these certificates – are now prevalent in online learning.

"The speed of change in today's business environment is unprecedented. That sounds like a cliche, but it's a reality," says Joe Schaffer, associate dean of executive education at Rutgers Business School. Lifelong business skills, he says, are beneficial for employees who want a competitive advantage.

Continue reading:



Rutgers Today
Newark, NJ
Monday, July 11, 2016

Rutgers Today

Rutgers School of Nursing and Rutgers Business School have teamed up to pilot the use of telemedicine technology to provide health care for underserved populations in Greater Newark. The pilot research study will employ a system developed by SmartCareDoc, a division of Telemed Ventures, to connect providers and patients virtually using internet-connected mobile devices.

The pilot is part of a joint grant between Rutgers Business School and Rutgers School of Public Affairs and Administration awarded by Rutgers University-Newark's Chancellor’s Seed Grant program to promote high-impact, publicly engaged, collaborative scholarship in Newark.

Benjamin Melamed, a professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School and the principal investigator of the project, will be assessing the effectiveness of the results. "Telemedicine has the potential for mitigating the health care crisis by improving patient access and substantially reducing costs," he said.

"Rutgers Business School is committed to using our expertise to make a positive social impact in the Newark community – a key strategic mission articulated by Rutgers-Newark Chancellor Cantor," said Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School. "Together with Rutgers School of Nursing, we can help solve real-world problems and find better ways of doing things," she said.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Dun & Bradstreet logo

Globalization increases access to more suppliers but also increases the chance of supply chain disruption. Domestic suppliers aren't immune, either: risk can range from government regulation to political unrest to a supplier's financial instability. All of these events can sideline your business.

"We're under the assumption that if we prepare well, we'll be okay. As much as preparation is important, it's not everything," said Arash Azadegan, PhD, an associate professor in supply chain management at Rutgers Business School.

Part of preparation is having a game plan for various scenarios and testing that game plan. Think through what can happen and have several solutions for each possibility.  "A good company recognizes that early stages of disruption are different than later stages of disruption, almost like a decathlon. You do different things in different stages," Azadegan said.

Full Article



Marketplace
New York City, NY
Tuesday, July 5, 2016

With so much of the election talk focusing on Wall Street, it's easy to overlook issues that are important to the small-business community. Small businesses are responsible for two-thirds of new job growth, meaning what affects them has big consequences for our whole economy. And there's more at stake than just economics. "It's not just about job creation," Professor Jeffrey Robinson told Marketplace reporter Mark Garrison. "It's about what small business owners do in the local community."

Listen to the full story:



CFC Innovation
New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, July 5, 2016

CFC Innovation

As evidence that big things may be coming to audit, the World Economic Forum undertook a "Technological Tipping Points" survey in 2015 to try to understand when several major technology-driven business and social changes might actually take place. Over 800 executives were asked, in one of the questions, when they thought that "30 percent of corporate audits would be performed by AI (artificial intelligence)."

Seventy-five percent of the respondents thought that this particular tipping point would be reached by 2025.

Of course, this prediction leaves a lot up in the air. Why 30 percent? And is the supposition that no humans will be involved at all?

I strongly doubt the latter point, but I do believe that audits are moving to become much more continuous, analytical, and at least semi-automated. But I'm quite confident that human auditors will be involved in 100 percent of audits by 2025 and for a long time thereafter.

I am not the first researcher to make similar assertions about analytics and continuous auditing. At Rutgers University, for example, Miklos Vasarhelyi, the director of the Rutgers Accounting Research Center and Continuous Auditing & Reporting Lab, has been advocating for more analytics and more continuous, semi-automated audit processes for many years.

He told me in an interview last year that because of regulatory constraints, internal audit processes within companies seem to be moving faster in this direction.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Supply & Demand Chain Executive

The world of manufacturing is at the start of its Internet of Things (IoT) ascent. Though author, David Turbide, reports in "Manufacturing Embraces the Industrial Internet of Things," that the IoT, also known in manufacturing as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), is a "logical extension of automation and connectivity that has been part of the plant environment for decades, primarily in the area known as machine-to-machine (M2M) communication" there is still much to learn.

With IoT in the mix, companies can engage in on-demand manufacturing at a higher level than ever before, states Kevin Lyons, associate professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management / Supply Chain Archeology Lab at Rutgers Business School. "In the past, manufacturers just produced as much product as they possibly could, and if they didn't sell everything, then they had a piled up inventory. Obviously that's a big expense. With IoT's predictive analytics capabilities, you can pinpoint what production is needed, where and how much, in real time."

He adds that with the right amount of IoT in place, and a streamlined supply chain, companies can trim costs from the manufacturing process, reinvest that money into additional technological advances, which in turn will save money on the labor side.

Full Article



WNBC-NY 4
Newark, NJ
Friday, June 24, 2016

WNBC-NY 4

The Brexit could hurt British tourism to New York in the short term, but the split may not be all bad for the city, observers say.

Markets were roiled Friday with the British pound dropping to a historic low after voters in the United Kingdom decided to exit the European Union.

On the other hand, such shifting currency changes make travel from the U.S. to the UK and Europe cheaper, as the dollar will go farther against a weaker pound and euro.

Morris Davis, the the Paul V. Profeta Chair of Real Estate and the Academic Director of the Center for Real Estate Studies at Rutgers Business School, said he predicts the decision will benefit the city overall and bring in additional business activity beyond real estate sales.

Full Article



CRAIN'S
Newark, NJ
Thursday, June 23, 2016

Crain's

The earthquake that could shake Europe if the United Kingdom votes to exit the European Union could be felt in New York. But not all of the repercussions would necessarily be bad.

The price of New York real estate could rise as investors look for safe havens against the threat of a global recession.

"If Britain leaves the European Union, the future of the EU is in doubt," said Morris Davis, a professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School. "A heightened sense of risk and volatility drives up the price of any asset that's viewed as safe." In addition, he added that a possible global recession stemming from the Brexit could pose a countervailing force to rising real estate prices.

Full Article



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Thursday, June 23, 2016

NJBIZ

In a first-ever study of the economic impact of clinical pharmaceutical trials in New Jersey, BioNJ and its partners found that these drug trials create 3,750 jobs and $779 million in economic output, the trade association announced Thursday.

BioNJ, in collaboration with the Rutgers Business School and the university’s Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, conducted the "Economic Impact Study of Clinical Trials Activity in New Jersey" to measure the value delivered to the health care system through the conducting of these tests.

Full Article



n NJTV News
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, June 21, 2016

NJTV News

“There’s debt by design. And debt by design, largely for women of color. Race and gender matter, in terms of the kind of debt that people are trapped in,” said Trina Scordo.

Scordo calls that “pinklining” and New Jersey Communities United produced a report about it with two other agencies. It says African-American women are 256 percent more likely to get subprime loans than their white male counterparts. Sixty percent of payday loans are made to women with average interest rates of 400 percent. And Scordo says education lenders often target minority women to take on unpayable debts, promising a better life.

“It doesn’t happen. It’s designed to keep somebody trapped, constantly paying it off, right? And it goes toward a very specific demographic. They’re not giving those loans to middle class men,” Scordo said.

The report highlights cases in Newark, Minneapolis and Los Angeles, and comes as no surprise to Rutgers University Provost Jerome Williams who will soon publish a study that found lenders do discriminate against minorities. He says banks make more money on struggling heads of household, especially single women.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Monday, June 20, 2016

Inside Supply Management

Gone are the days of spending a college career sitting in lecture halls taking notes on supply chain theory. Today's supply management students are getting firsthand, real-life experiences -- inside and outside the classroom -- through collaborations between their universities and companies that have a supply management focus. They are engaged in experiential learning by touring supply chain facilities, attending discussion and lecture forums by guest speakers from such companies as DuPont and Johnson & Johnson, participating in case studies, and securing internships and, after graduation, jobs.

One such center is the Center for Supply Chain Management at Rutgers Business School. The center is codirected by John Impellizzeri, a former C-suite executive at Schindler Elevator Corp. who previously was a member of the center's advisory board. "Advisory board members (who generally number between 15 and 20) are the highest-level strategic partnerships we have," says Impellizzeri, now a professor in Rutgers' supply chain management department. "There are many companies we partner with at different levels, but this group of companies is most strategic. We share a commitment to continuously innovating our curriculum and thoroughly preparing our students."

When Rutgers established its supply management program in 2007, one of the founding principles was incorporating both academic rigor and industry relevance, says Impellizzeri. "Our strategic partners help us achieve that objective. We're not short on academics, but we need to make sure we are staying very relevant to the industry trends," he says. "This can be done by creating curriculum that keeps up with those trends, by offering experiential education and by developing courses based on real-life industry projects."

Impellizzeri says that while he was on the advisory board, Rutgers' supply management students in an industry-client project course built Schindler Elevator a tool for forecasting raw metal commodities that the company is still using. "This consulting arrangement would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars if you contracted this with one of the top consulting firms," he says. "It's a win-win for the companies and the students, who gain valuable real-world experience. It's this type of rigorous-relevant education and training that makes our students highly sought after when they graduate."

Full Article



FastCompany
Newark, NJ
Monday, June 20, 2016

FastCompany

The strides being made by millennial women point to a future in which women, not men, are the target demographic for pricey goods and services. Since 2000, one-third more women than men have graduated from college, and more women are earning graduate degrees, too. Even once-male bastions such as law school are seeing the change. Millennial women are so outpacing men in higher education that it's inevitable they will become their generation's top earners.

The bottom line is that there's now a huge population of young women with the means to buy luxury goods once marketed almost exclusively to men. The smart marketers are realizing this. Take Acura. A commercial for the brand's RDX model opens with a young woman driving solo down a winding highway, singing along to Blondie's "Rapture" even after accepting a speakerphone call from three male underlings in a conference room.

"Does she know we can hear her?" whispers one of the men. "Oh yeah," replies another—hence the gender-bending tagline: "Drive Like a Boss." "I love it," says Kristina Durante, professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School.

Acura's angle is interesting because "it promotes a world that only kind of exists right now but is definitely coming, where women can be unapologetically badass," says Durante.

Full Article