In the Media

CNBC
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 8, 2016

CNBC

While the S&P 500 is reaching all-time highs on optimism over Donald Trump's economic agenda, some Wall Street strategists are increasingly worried about a widely followed valuation measure that's reached levels that preceded most of the major market crashes of the last 100 years.

"The cyclically adjusted P/E (CAPE), a valuation measure created by economist Robert Shiller now stands over 27 and has been exceeded only in the 1929 mania, the 2000 tech mania and the 2007 housing and stock bubble," Alan Newman wrote in his Stock Market Crosscurrents letter at the end of November.

Newman said even if the market's earnings increase by 10 percent under Trump's policies "we're still dealing with the same picture, overvaluation on a very grand scale."

"Only when CAPE is very high, say, CAPE is in the upper half of the tenth decile (CAPE higher than 27.6), future 10-year stock returns, on average, are lower than those on 10-year U.S. Treasurys," Valentin Dimitrov and Prem C. Jain wrote in paper titled "Shiller's CAPE: Market Timing and Risk" on Nov. 17.

Full Article

Paper



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 6, 2016

NJBIZ

Rutgers University, through its Rutgers Business School Center for Real Estate and Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, is offering a new graduate certificate in real estate development and redevelopment, it announced recently.

Registration for the spring 2017 semester is open through Jan. 17 at the Newark campus, the university said in a news release.

The program will take a multifaceted approach, including courses in topics such as land use planning, property tax regimes, urban redevelopment and more, the university said, enabling students to effectively develop or redevelop sites and contribute value to their communities.

"The Rutgers Business School Center for Real Estate was established to provide students with the most important and current skills in the field of real estate," Morris Davis, the Paul V. Profeta Chair and academic director of the center, said in a prepared statement.

Learn more



New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, December 5, 2016

During the holiday season, consumers have less skepticism and a greater tendency to spend. This, combined with the rushed nature of online sales, can lead people to fall into internet scams. "People are happy and their guard is down,” said Ashwani Monga, a professor and chair of the Marketing Department at Rutgers Business School - Newark and New Brunswick. "They are in a mood to give to charity as well as spend on themselves and their friends and family."

Read the full story:



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 5, 2016

NJBIZ

Going Global: Trade deal debate runs deep — Hispanic business leaders understand the push to rework trade deals with Latin American countries.They're just not sure it makes sense to do so.

In total, there was $12.2 billion in goods and products that was exported out of New Jersey to countries that are a part of the Trans-Pacific Partnership last year, according to Rutgers Business School professor Arturo Osorio-Fernandez.

And the North American Free Trade Agreement before the new pact has increased New Jersey’s exports by 425.8 percent since its implementation, he added.

"To give a point of reference, the rest of the world during that time increased exports 220 percent," Osorio-Fernandez said. "So New Jersey grew 1.93 times more in exports than the rest of the world."

Full Article (PDF)



Caldwell, NJ
Sunday, December 4, 2016

On November 15, Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUEED) held its Third Annual Entrepreneurship Awards Ceremony and Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship Program graduation. The event auspiciously coincided with Global Entrepreneurship Week.

Read the story:



citybizlist.com
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 1, 2016

citybizlist.com

Rutgers Center for Real Estate, an academic program positioned to transform and inspire the next generation of real estate leaders, announces Jonathan F.P. Rose and Thomas Gleason as the keynote speakers for its upcoming conference The Mount Laurel Doctrine: Where We Are & What Happens Now? on December 15th.

Jonathan F.P. Rose, President and Founder of Jonathan Rose Companies, a multi-disciplinary real estate development, planning, and investment firm, which creates real estate and planning models to address the challenges of the 21st century, will discuss insights from his recently published book on how to create resilient cities, The Well Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations and Human Behavior Teach us About the Future of Urban Life. Rose will discuss the need for each state to assess its affordable housing gap and provide suggested strategies on how to overcome it.

Thomas Gleason, Executive Director of MassHousing, the leading provider of affordable housing financing in Massachusetts and one of the largest housing finance agencies in the country, will offer insights on Massachusetts' highly successful affordable housing model and provide suggestions as to how other states can adopt a similar model.

In addition to Mr. Rose and Mr. Gleason, there will be two panel discussions featuring a collection of real estate industry leaders in policy making, government, law and real estate that will offer varied and different views on the affordable housing issue to educate attendees and provide them with a better understanding of the current state of affordable housing and the impact of the varied implementation process of the Mount Laurel Doctrine throughout New Jersey.

Full Article



iTreasurer
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 1, 2016

iTresurer

The extent to which President-elect Trump pursues the often he promised during his campaign will depend largely on who he chooses to fill key positions, and whoever that is will have readily available tools to pursue those policies.

That person now appears to be Wilbur Ross Jr. who was Tuesday named as the nominee for DoC secretary. The long-time Wall Street executive, known at the "king of bankruptcy," acted as an advisor to Trump during the campaign to develop policies in areas such as corporate tax cuts, infrastructure spending and international trade.

As the chief of private equity firm Wilbur R. Ross & Co., which has acquired and restructured failing companies, Mr. Ross has outspokenly advocated renegotiating US trade pacts. In a recent interview with the Financial Times he said he was keen to encourage international commerce while insisting that trade deals must be renegotiated to benefit of the US, echoing the heart if not the more extreme elements of Trump's campaign rhetoric.

Professor Farok Contractor, distinguished professor, management and global business, Rutgers Business School, said that an alternative to renegotiating trade deals is to give additional incentives to companies to increase US exports and thereby create more jobs in the US.

"Expanding plants devoted to exports and committing to hire a certain number of workers could be supported with accelerated depreciation provisions or even tax credits," Prof. Contractor said. "That could come into conflict with the WTO, but other countries do that in latent or subtle ways and get away with it."

Full Article



Chicago, IL
Tuesday, November 29, 2016

National Real Estate Investor

The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development Executive Director Lyneir Richardson published in National Real Estate Investor regarding revitalizing city neighborhoods.

The opening of a new retail store or restaurant can quickly bolster a neighborhood, creating cascading benefits for the residents ranging from access to healthy food and convenient services to increased property values and safer streets.

Here are six snapshots of how the opening of retail stores dramatically upgraded Chicago neighborhoods that had fallen on lean times:

Full Article



Omaha, NB
Saturday, November 26, 2016

Omaha World-Herald

Thousands of college students consumed root beer floats and advice from Warren Buffett at Piccolo's before the 20th Street restaurant closed last New Year's Eve.

Now the lunchtime lectures for future business leaders have moved to 72nd and F Streets, where Anthony's Steakhouse becomes a classroom/dining hall for students eager to hear the Berkshire Hathaway Inc. chairman talk about business, the economy and life in general.

Buffett's office said the new venue is working well. Besides the food and a traditional Omaha atmosphere, a basic requirement is capacity because Buffett hosts more than 165 students at a time.

They visit Omaha businesses owned by Berkshire, talk with executives and try their best questions on Buffett in a two-hour session before adjourning for lunch and group photos.

"His wisdom is equaled only by his generosity," said Professor John Longo, according to a post by his Rutgers Business School students who made the trip recently.

Full Article



The Star Ledger
Newark, NJ
Saturday, November 26, 2016

The Star Ledger

During a groundbreaking ceremony last week for a 22-story apartment tower across the street from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark Mayor Ras Baraka said the building would "turn this area completely around." Former Gov. Thomas H. Kean called the project, "a building block to bring back the greatest city in the state."

NJPAC is now in its 20th season, and eight years have passed since a Philadelphia firm was named to develop the One Theater Square site. So, why did such a critical project lay dormant for so long, even as other hi-rise apartments sprouted one after another in Jersey City, only a few miles east?

But Jersey City had something to offer during the post-recession years that Newark did not, said Kevin Riordan, executive director of the Center for Real Estate at the Rutgers Business School in Newark. Along with its easy commute to Manhattan via PATH train, New York Waterway ferries, and the Holland Tunnel, one of the main factors driving Jersey City's latest residential building boom, said Riordan, has been its strong job growth.

In a new urban era when people want to live near where they work, the demand for housing in Jersey City was met first by its existing housing stock, then by newly built high-rise apartments.

"Jobs, and in particular well-paying jobs, were clustered around Jersey City," Riordan said. "Jersey City and Hoboken always had attractive brownstones. The next level of development was to create vertical, or high-rise."

As the Hudson waterfront built out, forcing up land values, construction costs and rents, development began to spread west, particularly to areas with PATH access, including Jersey City's Journal Square neighborhood, Harrison, and finally Newark.

"(The) cost of creating those high rises and the cost of living in those high rises has gone up, so development has been pushed out west," Riordan said.

Full Article



NJTV
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Arturo Osorio, a professor at Rutgers Business School, said the impact would be felt in communities across New Jersey. “The conveyor belt of economy of goods and services in the U.S. will have a domino effect in the local economy," he told NJTV correspondent Brenda Flanagan.

Read story:



New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

MyCentralJersey.com

In an effort to help end unemployment and underemployment that they say plagues the autism population in the United States, Dr. Barbie Zimmerman-Bier and husband Dr. Steven Bier are taking their popular Popcorn For The People brand nationwide through a new online retail store and with the help of a new manufacturing facility.

The online division is an extension of Popcorn For The People Cafe' in East Brunswick, formerly known as Pop in Cafe'. That enterprise opened in 2015 in the Brunswick Square Mall.

Popcorn For The People also is also benefiting from a partnership with Rutgers University.

The Biers approached Senior Associate Dean Martin Markowitz of Rutgers Business School to discuss an association.

Rutgers now is involved through its branch of Enactus, an international nonprofit that helps other nonprofits become self-sustaining. Rutgers students work pro bono so that they can learn real-world skills while doing good in the community. At present Popcorn For The People has about 15 students involved in different facets of the operation, from finance, to supply chain to sales and marketing.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Monday, November 21, 2016

U.S. News & World Report

4 Things Social Entrepreneurs Need in a B-School
Strong programs in social enterprise balance quantitative classes with strategy courses, experts say.

Investigate what recent grads are doing: Jeffrey Robinson, associate professor at the Rutgers Business School at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey—Newark and New Brunswick, says prospective students should target b-schools whose grads are making an impact through social enterprise.

One way to do that, Robinson says, is to determine whether the winners of the school's pitch competitions for entrepreneurs or its startup incubators actually followed through on their projects and whether you find their projects compelling.

"You don't want sloppy projects," he says. "You want projects with some substance to them."

Full article



Newswire
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, November 21, 2016

PRNewswire

Gerard Adams, the founder of social impact startup accelerator, FOWNDERS, and the founder of "Voice of Generation Y" publication Elite Daily, will be speaking at Rutgers Business School on November 30 at 6:30PM. Adams' talk, at 100 Rockafeller Road Room 2071 in Piscataway Township, New Jersey, is free to attend with registration.

Attendees may register here: http://tinyurl.com/MillennialMentor

Adams' talk is part of Rutgers' Community Entrepreneurship Series which brings influential members in the tri-state area to Rutgers to inspire and collaborate with the Rutgers business community on startup funding, sales leadership and training and excellence in executing new business ideas. The event is a collaborative meetup being held by Rutgers Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development, the New Jersey Technology Council and Scarlet Startups.

Gerard Adams was recently named to Magic Johnson's coveted 32 Under 32 List and gave his TEDx talk at New Jersey Institute of Technology in September 2016. In 2015 Adams sold the company he cofounded, Elite Daily, to the Daily Mail for $50 million. In 2016 Adams founded FOWNDERS, the social impact startup accelerator based in Newark New Jersey to empower other entrepreneurs from Newark, New Jersey, where Adams was raised. FOWNDERS' mission is to give back to the community by lifting entrepreneurs with resources once thought unimaginable.

Regarding his talk at Rutgers, Adams said "Rutgers' Business School is a pillar of the New Jersey economy and among the best institutions for entrepreneurs globally. That energy--that vibe--that shows young entrepreneurs that they can come from anywhere resonates with me."

"Gerard Adams means it when he says 'Leaders Create Leaders,' said Assistant Director Alfred Blake of Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Programs in a nod towards Adams' self-produced television series, Leaders Create Leaders. The Millennial Mentor, from his rise leading up to Elite Daily and then FOWNDERS has proven time and time again his ability to keep an audience on the edge of its seats--wanting more."

Full Article



Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, November 20, 2016

Bloomberg Businessweek

An MBA can get you access to hot internships, sprawling alumni networks, and the most desirable jobs in the market.

As a bonus, it can wipe out your savings and swell your debt.

More graduate degrees in business are awarded annually than in any other field in the U.S., and new business schools are accredited by the dozen every year. How do you find the program that will make you stand out in the job market—and justify the huge expense?

To guide you, here's our annual ranking of full-time U.S. MBA programs (international rankings are coming soon), based on data we compiled from more than 1,000 recruiters, 15,000 alumni, and 9,000 recent graduates. We continue last year's focus on how well the schools channel their graduates into good jobs and, with a new survey of MBAs after graduation, offer more insight into what grads can expect from their careers.

Our Full-Time MBA rankings comprise five elements. So it's possible to rank highly without knocking every category out of the park. For example, Stanford which is the No. 2 school on our list, ranked No. 57 for job placement.  And Rutgers Business School landed at No. 52 on the list, but in job placement for its MBA students, Rutgers ranked No. 1.

Full Article



World Journal
Flushing, N.Y.
Thursday, November 17, 2016

Ashwani Monga, professor of marketing and chairman of the marketing department at Rutgers Business School, argues that the concept of double eleven is not the same as the traditional Black Friday of the United States. "Black Friday has a long history in the United States as a discount day," Monga said. "Double Eleven was created just a few years ago not just as a simple shopping day, but a comprehensive day of online shopping, store sales, community carnival and other activities, very young and dynamic."

The full story in WorldJournal.com appears in Chinese:



Real Estate NJ
Newark, NJ
Thursday, November 17, 2016

Real Estate NJ

The academic director at Rutgers University's real estate program has been elected to serve on the board of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, the school announced.

Morris A. Davis, the Paul V. Profeta Chair of Real Estate, will serve a three-year term that begins in 2017. The board appointment with the association, known as AREUEA, will allow Davis to network with fellow academic and industry leaders and foster continued research in the real estate sector to help guide decision making for years to come.

The Rutgers Business School Center for Real Estate said the appointment will enhance the reach of the three-year-old program and continue to showcase its growth as a center of research and learning.

"I am honored to join a board filled with so many influential minds from the worlds of real estate, urban economics and macroeconomics," Davis said in a prepared statement. "I hope to bring my experience and the work and research being done at the Rutgers Center for Real Estate into this role to help enhance the reputation and reach of the AREUEA organization.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Tuesday, November 15, 2016

New York citybizlist

Rutgers Center for Real Estate, an academic program positioned to transform and inspire the next generation of real estate leaders, will continue its premier conference series hosting a landmark Real Estate Conference: The Mount Laurel Doctrine; Where We Are & What Happens Now?

The conference will bring together leaders in policy making, government, law and real estate on both sides of the affordable housing issue to examine the tensions that currently exist between municipalities and developers. The conference will take place on December 15, 2016, at the Newark Museum located at 49 Washington St, Newark, NJ.

Registration and breakfast start at 7:30 AM with the program beginning at 8:15 AM. Registration is required and is now open at http://rbs.force.com/realestatehome

"Our premier conference series is designed to examine some of the most pressing issues facing both society and our industry, bringing together leaders not in only in real estate, but also public policy to exchange ideas, to elevate the discussion and to promote an environment in which we can share best practices and work together toward solutions," said Morris Davis, Academic Director at the Rutgers Business School Center for Real Estate.

"Affordable housing is a major issue not only in New Jersey, but across the country. The Mount Laurel Doctrine had a powerful impact on achieving fair housing, but has also created several, severe challenges for the real estate industry which need to be evaluated based on where things stand today. This conference allows us to bring together leaders from every side of the issue to work through challenges and promote innovative ideas and solutions to determine the best course of action moving forward.

Full Article



New York, NY
Tuesday, November 15, 2016

The Huffington Post

"Stress leads consumers to favor saving money," says Kristina Durante, an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School who researches the effect of hormones and consumer behavior. Although stressed consumers want to save, when faced with a spending decision, stressed consumers will pay for necessities they think will help restore control rather than splurge on non-necessities.

In a study published in the Journal of Marketing Research in October, Durante and Juliano Laran at University of Miami find that stress leads consumers to save money in general but spend strategically on products they believe are essential.

In several experiments, Durante and Laran created stressful situations for participants, including leading them to believe they would give presentations in front of judges and directing others to write about a stressful time in their lives. Faced with the stress alone, most say they wanted to save more money.

Durante says the body reacts to stressful challenges with an increase in the hormone cortisol, which leads us to focus our attention toward the threat so that we can attempt to overcome it or alleviate it. "People lock down and enter survival mode and protect resources as a means to ensure survival," she says.

Full Article



EContent
Newark, NJ
Monday, November 14, 2016

EContent

Green and red are the traditional colors that signify the celebration of Yuletide and that Americans use to deck their halls for the holidays. But digital marketers who want to see more green and avoid the red on their sales charts, post-Thanksgiving, need to think less about mass appeal and instead stress better brand experiences via one-on-one engagement. In other words, package more emarketing customization to gift-minded shoppers in the form of personalized digital advertising.

Stacy Smollin Schwartz, marketing instructor at Rutgers Business School, concurs. Patrons "are inundated with product choices, and it can be hard to know where to start, particularly when you are shopping for a gift for someone else. In the digital realm, data-assisted personalization shepherds consumers through the process so they can follow a path without becoming overwhelmed," says Schwartz.

Full Article