In the Media

WalletHub
Washinton, DC
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

WalletHub

"Deals on new cars tend to get better in October as the new models are delivered to the lots.  So, there may be an incentive to wait. But several factors suggest that it may be an opportune time to make a purchase.  First, we are approaching the end of the month.  Many dealers have quotas that need to be met.  They are likely to give a better deal to consumers as the month end approaches," said John Longo, Department of Finance & Economics, Rutgers Business School.

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EContent
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, May 23, 2016

EContent

A study, commissioned by Retale that polled American adults, reveals that 60% click on mobile banner ads by accident due to a finger slip or small screen size; merely 16% intentionally click on mobile banner ads because they like the product, service, or company being promoted; 66% believe mobile banner ads have little to zero value; and 68% find accidental clicks to be annoying.

Should you fear the fat finger and cater instead to the coupon-clipping faithful and rewards-seeking repeat buyer? That seems like sound advice to Stacy Smollin Schwartz, instructor of professional practice in the marketing department at Rutgers Business School. "Mobile-enabled coupons and loyalty cards work beautifully because they offer the benefits of both ecommerce and brick-and-mortar shopping for today's omnichannel shoppers and give the consumer control over which bits of each to use and when," Schwartz says.

Given the small screen sizes and task orientation we are used to with our smartphones, traditional ad banners often don't pass the test for effective mobile marketing. "Banner ads seek to distract consumers from adjacent content - not add function, convenience, or seamlessness to their task at hand," says Schwartz. "They often serve to be clunky road blocks-the antithesis to the invisible blending of online and offline worlds that mobile is so good at. We may trip over them trying to click on something else, artificially boosting click-through rates."

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New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

Asbury Park Press

Decked out in robes of scarlet and black, caps perched smartly on their heads, the graduates found themselves on the cusp of adult life. And kicking it off in once-in-a-lifetime style was the keynote speaker for the Rutgers University-New Brunswick commencement of the Class of 2016.

Not only did Sunday's ceremony celebrate the university's 250th anniversary — it was also the first in Rutgers history to receive face-to-face words of wisdom from a sitting president.

With more than 50,000 watching and listening, Obama gave the keynote address under a flag at half-staff for Peace Officers Memorial Day, resonating with the young and their parents.

Making note of the importance of the 250th anniversary graduation ceremony, Obama recounted the start of Rutgers — a converted tavern known as Queen's College.

"From that first pub, Rutgers has evolved into one of the finest research institutions in America," he said. "Every day, tens of thousands come to this intellectual melting pot in what just might be America's most diverse student body. America converges here and the history of Rutgers mirrors the evolution of America — stronger, richer and a more dynamic and more inclusive nation."

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USA Today
New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

USA Today Colleges

From his first words, Obama had the crowd hooked. For more than 40 minutes, he spoke of the slow march of progress, the acceleration of the pace of change, of political games and upheaval, of intellect versus common sense, economic disparity and climate change.

Making note of the importance of the 250th anniversary graduation ceremony, Obama recounted the start of Rutgers — a converted tavern known as Queen's College.

"From that first pub, Rutgers has evolved into one of the finest research institutions in America," he said. "Every day, tens of thousands come to this intellectual melting pot in what just might be America’s most diverse student body. America converges here and the history of Rutgers mirrors the evolution of America — stronger, richer and a more dynamic and more inclusive nation."

Obama said the Class of 2016 is a generation that has "everything it takes to make brighter choices."

"Choices toward cooperation, innovation and hope," he said. "You are confident, smarter and better educated than my generation, though we had better penmanship and we are certainly better spellers. They did not have spell check in my day. You are more exposed to the world. … You have the tools to lead us. You'll figure it out and look at things with fresh eyes."

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NorthJersey.com
New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

NorthJersey.com

President Obama on Sunday exhorted graduates of Rutgers University to reject cynicism and become politically active, and he took critical aim at some Republican ideas that have gained currency this election season, such as building a wall along the Mexican border.

"The world is more connected than ever before, and it's becoming more connected every day. Building walls won't change that," Obama said to applause. "The biggest challenges we face cannot be solved in isolation."

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Newark, NJ
Monday, May 9, 2016

New Jersey 101.5

How do New Jersey economists feel about the idea to raise the minimum hourly wage to $15? We asked a few of them.

Scott Rothbort, professor of finance at Seton Hall University, says he doesn't believe the government should be fixing any prices, whether it be labor costs or rent control.

"I believe that the markets should take care of pricing. The law of supply and demand should."

But Mitchell Koza, a professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, says, "from a humanitarian point of view, from and equality point of view, it is something that is laudible."

According to Koza, "you cannot support people, you cannot support a family on the existing minimum wage." He says he thinks that it is an experiment that should be tried.

"Too many people in our state are suffering."

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Tampa Bay, FL
Monday, May 9, 2016

Florida Politics

The Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council unanimously voted Monday to have staff members discuss strategies with a representative of the Rutgers Business School and its Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.

“It’s exciting,” said former Pinellas County Commissioner Barbara Sheen Todd. Todd, who serves on the TBRPC, said she had asked that the center’s representative, Lyneir Richardson, come to speak to the group.

Todd said she decided to contact the Rutgers group because it offered something different in strategies and had been awarded a national grant to work in urban areas around the country. Unlike other agencies or companies who want money in return for recommendations, the Rutgers group has its own. And Richardson said Rutgers will help communities find grants and other funds to help accomplish their goals.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, May 2, 2016

Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine

To strengthen and improve the business careers of veterans, Rutgers Business School introduced a mini-MBA program, Business Management for Military and Veterans, in fall 2015.   Veterans who participate in this Executive Education program earn a non-credit certificate.  The hope is if they like the program and demonstrate the right aptitude and skills, they'll enroll in a full MBA program.

In its first year, it attracted 11 participants. Most of its Executive Education programs attract from 10 to 30 students, which ensure close interaction between students and faculty.

The mini-MBA program lasts one week, starting on Monday and ending Friday.  Keeping it at one week's duration enhances its appeal, explained Margaret O'Donnell, program director for Rutgers' Executive Education.  "We find the accelerated form works well; some are offered online (though the mini-MBA isn't)," she said.

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NorthJersey.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, May 2, 2016

NorthJersey.com

The power of the second degree LinkedIn connection depends upon the quality of the first degree connection.

The fact that you have any specific quantity of connections on LinkedIn is of little real meaning. There's also the quality issue; in other words, just how good are these connections?

For instance, we used the example of the person with 500 first-degree connections.

But if all 500 of your connections have 500 of their own, then you have 250,000 second-degree connections, and when you do a search of target employers, and a second-degree connection comes up with a real good quality first-degree connection in between, now you're tapping into the power of the second degree.

Not that the formula is perfect. Far from it, actually, as was pointed out in an email to me by Daniel Levin, professor in the Management and Global Business Department in Rutgers Business School, who said, "I like the overall point ... I did want to point out one assumption made (both in the text and in the equation) that may be mistaken: namely, that there is no overlap in second-degree connections. That is, if 500 people each know 500 people, it is actually not the case that the result is 250,000 people, because the original 500 will know a lot of the same people in common (including each other). This is because the world is "clumpy" in that people sort themselves into relatively closed networks of similar people..."

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Wired Magazine
New York, NY
Friday, April 29, 2016

Wired Magazine

Amazon's electronic assistant foiled my first attempt at ordering a Domino's pie through one of the company's many platform plays. I also could have tweeted or texted or even turned on the TV. But I chose Amazon Echo because my Echo and I have a good rapport. Or we did, until I tried having it deliver a pizza to my mouth.

Alexa vexed me. I'd done the requisite work, setting up a Pizza Profile on the Domino's desktop site, enabling the Domino's "skill" in my Alexa app, and working up a healthy appetite. And yet, not a slice to be seen. What seemed so easy—and Domino's does make it sound easy—was anything but.

I mention this only to raise an important caveat before explaining Domino's AnyWare, an ambitious campaign to let you order pizza on every platform as quickly as humanly and technologically possible. AnyWare is innovative and a lot of fun. There's a lot to like about it.

Except trying it for the first time. But then, whether you actually try it is almost beside the point.

That willingness to take risks and break stuff often makes Domino's the first, and sometimes only, retailer trying new tricks. Consumers respond to that. "They're known for convenience," says Stacy Smollin Schwartz, a digital marketing veteran who teaches at Rutgers Business School. "In terms of the program fitting with that brand image, and giving them some press and some attention that they're trying to extend the distribution and convenience factor to mobile channels, it does give the impression that they have this tech-forwardness."

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New York, NY
Friday, April 22, 2016

Bloomberg Business

Verizon Communications Inc. consultant Timothy Donovan was told that opening global trade barriers would lift everyone from the mail room to the executive suite, but there he was Wednesday, on strike for the seventh straight day, calling on his employer to protect workers' jobs, wages and benefits.

If trade agreements could help U.S. workers, Donovan said, he'd be all for them.

"This is a political issue that (we've) been chewing on for more than 200 years," said Farok Contractor, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School in Newark. "Every political cycle this issue comes up."

The U.S. is squarely in the middle of the global economy. It is a member of the World Trade Organization, which spells out trade rules among 154 countries. And it has its own free trade agreements with 20 countries that are meant to even out the playing field and allow exporters to sell their products cheaper, Contractor said.

Contractor said the benefits are palpable. Americans have access to lower-priced goods, giving consumers more spending power. A recent check of Target's web site, for example, found a Magnavox 46-inch-screen, high-definition television set on sale for $349.99.

Contractor said many corporations have taken the profit they've generated in the global economy, and, instead of giving workers raises or better benefits, have invested in technology to become even more efficient; rewarded shareholders by increasing dividends; and awarded executives bonuses.

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EContent
Medford, NJ
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

EContent

Last year, the buy button hit big, with Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram adopting more enticing ecommerce solutions in an effort to alter the consumer experience on social media and increase revenue opportunities. Since that time, a wider trend has unfolded, as demonstrated by major publishers like Vox Media, The Huffington Post, and Bonnier Corporation pursuing content monetization options: the maturation of shoppable content and the emergence of a universal shopping cart to make that content shoppable.

Stacy Smollin Schwartz, instructor of professional practice in the Marketing Department at Rutgers Business School, says it makes sense today to put a shopping button in as many places as possible. "A marketer never knows when a specific customer might be ready to buy, and having a shopping basket at the ready within their social media posts, banner ads and videos covers their bases," says Schwartz. "Even if these new buy button placements don't provide a significant revenue stream, they are a convenience for shoppers who might be ready to decide. And these e-tailers get to appear more user friendly and accessible, especially among shoppers who don't wish to interrupt their experience on the content page they're currently viewing."

Schwartz adds that savvy marketers are quickly learning that today's shoppers enter and exit purchase decisions at various points during a site visit; hence, content providers have to "plan their strategies around a circular consumer decision journey rather than through the top of a linear sales funnel."

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, April 19, 2016

NJBIZ

Bloomberg Businessweek recently released its annual update to its list of best undergraduate business schools for 2016.

In the most recent rankings, Villanova took the top spot, jumping 23 places from its previous ranking of 24th in 2015.

But several colleges from the Garden State made leaps in the rankings this year, as well.

The biggest jump was made by Rutgers Business School in Newark, which moved 31 spots, to No. 97 from No. 128 in 2015.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

New Jersey 101.5

A new study from LinkedIn provides new evidence of just how much the job market trends are shifting from previous generations.

The study finds that that millennials are changing jobs at a much more rapid pace than their parents did, sometimes as hopping jobs as many as four times in their first decade out of college.

"Over the last 20 years, the number of companies people worked for in the five years after they graduated nearly has doubled," the study's authors wrote.

Eugene Gentile, director of the Office of Career Management at Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick, said millennials are expecting more than their predecessors.

"If they're not getting what they perceive to be full value for their efforts or full compensation, they're more likely to jump," Gentile said.

And it is not always about just job security and compensation.

"Companies that are socially aware and socially responsible, and if they feel that they're not getting that piece of it too, that's another reason to move on," Gentile said.

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Newark, NJ
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Bloomberg Business

Rutgers Business School's MBA program was ranked No. 3 in the nation for MBA employment in the latest U.S. News & World Report (2017) Best Business School Rankings.

Strong corporate connections to New York and New Jersey's top global companies helped 98 percent of Rutgers Full-Time MBA graduates obtain employment within three months of graduation. The high employment ranking contributed to Rutgers Full-Time MBA being recognized as the No. 1 Public MBA in the Tri-State area (N.Y., N.J. and Conn.).

"This historic milestone highlights the dedication and hard work of our MBA Office of Career Management and our entire MBA team, and the rising reputation of Rutgers Business School among U.S. corporations and recruiters," said Rutgers Business School Dean Lei Lei.

"We have cultivated long-term relationships with Fortune 500 firms, and these strong partnerships help employers as much as our students," said Dean Vera, director of the Rutgers MBA Office of Career Management. "We can often speak to student's qualifications beyond what the recruiter sees on a resume or cover letter. Our students have a roll-up-your-sleeves attitude when it comes to proving themselves during their summer internships," he said.

In a competitive job market, the hard work of Rutgers MBA students led to an impressive employment outcome that compared favorably among peer business schools in the Big 10.

Comparison of Big 10 Business Schools
MBA Employment 3 Months after Graduation (%)

1. Rutgers Business School: 98.3
2. University of Iowa (Tippie): 97.9
3. Ohio State University (Fisher): 95.7
4. University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign): 94.1
5. Northwestern University (Kellogg): 93.8
6. University of Michigan (Ross): 92.1
7. Michigan State University (Broad): 90.6
8. University of Wisconsin: 89.5
9. University of Minnesota (Carlson): 89.2
10. Indiana University (Kelley): 89.1
11. Penn State University (Smeal): 86.4
12. University of Maryland (Smith): 82.4
13. Purdue University (Krannert): 80.9
14. University of Nebraska (Lincoln): N/A

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

NJBIZ

College Choice released its list of the Top 50 graduate schools that offer a master's degree in business administration on Monday. The list included big names such as Harvard and Stanford in the Top 5.

But how did colleges in New Jersey fare?

Well, the Garden State did not go entirely unrepresented: Rutgers University ranked 49th on the list.

"Rutgers Business School has strong ties with top companies in New York and New Jersey, making it easier for graduates to find jobs," College Choice said in its ranking.

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Jobs MBA Rankings


Newark, NJ
Monday, April 11, 2016

Bloomberg Business

For corporate responsibility and sustainability professionals, there is an important area that needs to be in focus, a critical area that presents challenges, risks and myriad opportunities: the global supply chain. Enterprises of all sizes and sectors are making a difference in society, creating competitive advantages and mitigating risks through responsible supply chain and procurement practices.

The Institute for Ethical Leadership at the Rutgers Business School and the Governance & Accountability Institute are partnering to offer a Corporate Social Responsibility Certificate Program with a key topic area of supply chain management. The subject will be led by Dr. Kevin Lyons, an associate professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School and will focus on these critical topics for corporate managers:

 

  • Quantifying economic and social development options
  • Focusing on four main supply chain and sustainability responsibilities
  • Emergence of social procurement strategies
  • Stakeholder mapping
  • Working with social enterprises
  • The importance of the circular economy shift

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CNBC
New York, NY
Thursday, April 7, 2016

CNBC

Could Bernie Sanders, a self-described "democratic socialist" and Wall Street's biggest critic, be an entrepreneurial genius?

A closer look at the ideas and methods propelling the 'Feel the Bern' phenomenon, and interviews with entrepreneurial experts, show that the Sanders campaign has displayed plenty of business smarts tailored to today's market.

"An entrepreneur is someone who understands a particular market segment, who can energize that base and who can get it to take action," said Lyneir Richardson, executive director of The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School.

"Bernie Sanders is speaking to a segment that not only other politicians but most big corporations want to figure out how to sell to: millennials," Richardson said.

"Everyone's going after that demographic right now, and millennials are responding to Sanders in a way that the rest of the country and business world is watching and learning from."

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, April 5, 2016

NJBIZ

A typical day for a developer? As George Jacobs explains, it can be anything but typical.

Take this example from a recent Wednesday.

"Today, I was tracking down an FAA permit because I'm building a shopping center in Elizabeth," said Jacobs, president of Clifton-based Jacobs Enterprises Inc. "We're under construction … for a Foodtown-anchored strip center, and we have to use a crane because we're hanging some prefab walls."

"We’re in the flight path of Newark airport."

Jacobs recounted the story last month at the Rutgers Real Estate Career Seminar before more than a 100 MBA candidates and prospective students who are considering careers in commercial real estate. It was the first-ever career seminar hosted by the quickly growing Rutgers Center for Real Estate, drawing a packed crowd to a classroom at Rutgers Business School's main building in downtown Newark.

For his part, Jacobs was one of 11 New Jersey real estate industry leaders who were on hand to share their experiences and answer questions, representing a cross-section of different practices and asset classes that operate within the sector.

"Students just don't get much exposure to real practitioners," Paul Profeta, owner and president of Paul V. Profeta Associates in West Orange, told attendees at the March 23 event. "Today, you've got some real practitioners — these are people who put bread and butter on the table."

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NJBIZ
New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, April 5, 2016

NJBIZ

A conference next week will shine a light on Halstead Healthcare System, a dominant provider whose footprint is filled with all types of physical assets — from a suburban campus and off-site specialty centers, to recently acquired physician practices and struggling urban hospitals.

The organization also happens to be entirely fictional, part of a theoretical case study hatched by the Rutgers Center for Real Estate that will be the foundation for its second annual conference.

"As part of an academic institution … the Center for Real Estate feels with all of its events that we have to deliver an elevated discussion, a higher level of substance when it hosts a conference or seminar or other event that focuses on real estate," said Ted Zangari, an executive committee member for the center. "So we thought that an issues-packed, fact-driven hypothetical or case study would help us raise the level of discussion to a more substantive level than you might find at some of the other conferences on this topic in the past."

The Future of Healthcare Real Estate Symposium will take place Friday, April 15, at Heldrich Hotel in New Brunswick.

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