In the Media

YAHOO! Finance
Lewisville, TX
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

YAHOO Finance

Teladoc, Inc. (TDOC), the nation's leading provider of telehealth services, today announced that Mark Hirschhorn has been appointed to the newly created role of chief operating officer, while continuing to serve as the company's chief financial officer.

"I'm exceptionally proud of the company we've built and am incredibly energized to partner with Jason, and the leadership team, to help lead our next phase of corporate growth, winning the hearts and minds of our members and extensive client base," said Mark Hirschhorn, Teladoc COO and CFO.

Mr. Hirschhorn received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Rutgers University in 1986 and a Master of Business Administration degree from Rutgers Business School in 1987. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

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Alumni MBA


Orlando, FL
Monday, September 26, 2016

University of Central Florida

I spent most of the week at Rutgers Business School attending a conference on the future of graduate business education.  Usually I consider attending a conference a "win" if I leave feeling affirmed about what we are doing along with one good idea I can steal.  I left this conference feeling affirmed with three good ideas I could steal.  No doubt my team will be thrilled with today's "to do" list.

No doubt the most affirming moment came when a corporate executive said: "Every student needs a course in failure.  It should include how to recover from mistakes, especially how to fire people."

And so, I'm issuing an RFP to anyone on our faculty interested in developing an undergraduate or graduate course on failure.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, September 26, 2016

The Daily Targum

Everyone fails, but not everyone can learn from mistakes and go on to succeed.

That was just one of the lessons Forbes Magazine Editor-in-Chief Steve Forbes presented Sunday at the State Theatre at Rutgers Business School's "Coming Home: Honoring our Heroes and Heritage" event.

"What is the fundamental difference between people today and people from the Stone Age? Same human bodies, same appetites, same resources. The difference between us and (ancient civilizations) is we know more," he said. "It's very basic, we have more knowledge . . . as long as knowledge is not destroyed, we can come back and we can move ahead."

Utilizing that knowledge properly is important to success, he said. Steve Jobs failed numerous times and was even fired from the company he founded. He was able to learn from his mistakes and became a famous leader after returning to the company a few years later.

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Newark, NJ
Wednesday, September 21, 2016

MyCentralJersey.com

Former Gov. Jim Florio and Rutgers faculty hosted a delegation of Namibian executives to identify mutual research solutions in energy, infrastructure, agriculture and finance.

John McLaughlin of the McLaughlin Global Network facilitated the Sept. 19 visit with the Rutgers Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs and the Rutgers Business School.

Florio said that exchanges with business leaders abroad is "about New Jersey maximizing economic opportunities here and overseas."

"It is also in the national interest to develop collaborations with people around the world," he said. "Research universities are extremely valuable conduits to these international opportunities. Rutgers excels in a number of areas."Foibe Namene, the CEO of the Electricity Control Board, Namibia's energy regulator, said that her institution's goals were to "encourage investors" and position Namibia "as a hub of energy efficiency" in the southern Africa region.

“New Jersey is known for energy management and energy efficiency," she said. "There are a number of challenges, including the supply from the local power generation.

Kevin Lyons, a faculty member in Rutgers Business School, presented a supply chain model designed to mitigate risk and help direct cost-efficient operations.

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Chicago, IL
Wednesday, September 14, 2016

CRAIN' Chicago Business

Standing on the corner of 39th Street and King Drive on the site of the soon-to-open Mariano's in Bronzeville, Lyneir Richardson stares admiringly—not at the grocer's shiny new sign, but at the vacant lots across the street.

"Look at those 'For Sale,' signs," he says. "They weren't there a few months ago. (The Mariano's store) is a catalytic type of investment. The question is, what other retail should be here that will help continue strengthening the neighborhood?"

Richardson, executive director of Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, and CEO of Chicago Trend, or Transforming Retail Economics of Neighborhood Development, says his new for-profit social enterprise company, backed by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and Chicago Community Trust, has three advantages that will help it build top-tier retail developments in Bronzeville, Chatham, Pullman and other neighborhoods on the South and West sides: data, development contacts and dollars.

To get independent businesses and major chains like Chipotle and Target to move into "transitional" neighborhoods, Richardson says, Trend is using sophisticated analysis and newly collected data about neighborhood buying power. It's also banking on relationships with retailers he and his co-founder, Robert Weissbourd, have formed over a collective 50 years in the real estate and development worlds, plus $7 million in prestigious MacArthur funding that will be used as an incentive for retailers to move into places they might otherwise overlook.

Richardson moved to New Jersey in 2009 to run former Newark Mayor Cory Booker's economic development effort and eventually joined Rutgers University as executive director of its Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. He'll commute weekly as he runs both operations.

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AICPA
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, September 13, 2016

AICPA

The audit field is rapidly evolving. Changes such as the emergence of continuous auditing, data analytics, Big Data, and integration of information technology require auditors to have new approaches and to become proficient in information technologies and analytical methods.

"In the past, businesses were run from the financial statements," said Miklos A. Vasarhelyi, Ph.D., professor of accounting and director of the Continuous Auditing & Reporting Laboratory at Rutgers University. "Today, businesses are run differently, based on hundreds of linked transactions happening at once." As a result, the role of the auditor is shifting: auditors are now able to identify and verify larger amounts of data than they once were and perform audits on a continuous basis as opposed to a periodic one.

Full Article



Philadelphia, PA
Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Wharton Business School

Mark Burgess, Rutgers Business School Executive Education faculty member, was a guest on the Wharton Marketing Matters Business radio show on Sirius XM (Sept 7th).   He and his business partner and wife Cheryl, also co-author of The Social Employee (McGraw-Hill), were invited to lead discussions on social employee advocacy marketing and social leaders.  The host was Catharine Hays, Executive Director of the Wharton Future of Advertising program. 

Listen



WDRB.com
Louisville, KY
Wednesday, September 7, 2016

WBRD.com

Violence and poverty took center stage at a west Louisville forum on Wednesday.

It was part of "The West Louisville Forum: Solutions for Urban American" held at the St. Stephen Baptist Church Family Life Center.

The guest speaker was Dr. Nancy DiTomaso, professor from Rutgers University.

Thomas Queen, a freshman at Simmons College of Kentucky who listened to the Dr. DiTomaso's speech, said he was throwing his life away before he arrived on campus.

"[I was] hanging with the wrong crowd, going to the wrong places, a lot of fighting, a lot of bad decisions, a lot of drugs," Queen said.

But a chance meeting with the president of Simmons, Dr. Kevin Cosby, changed his life.

"I told him my name, and he started telling me about my grandfather, which I never knew ... was a famous piano organist."

In addition to the family history lesson, Dr. Cosby gave Queen a second chance. That's something Dr. DiTomaso, a Rutgers Business School professor, says has been going on for years.

"We should be thinking about what good things whites do for other whites," she said.

Dr. DiTomaso was the guest speaker at Simmons' monthly forum. Her research on the root cause of violence and poverty in urban areas might be controversial to some because she believes it starts with whites.

"They use their family members, they use acquaintances, all of whom, of course, primarily look like them," Dr. DiTomaso said.

Full Article and Video



Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, September 5, 2016

CNC China News International

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivered a keynote speech while addressing the Business 20 (B20) summit in east China's Hangzhou on Saturday.

Distinguished Professor Farok J. Contractor, Management & Global Business, Rutgers Business School said: "Well, I thought it was a very comprehensive speech which covers not only the concerns about other G20 governments, but also showing China as an example over the last 38 years of reform of how it lifted 700 or more million people out of poverty into middle class status."

"It addresses also where China is today, where it needs to go in the future, converting itself from mass production quantity economy into an economy which concentrates on innovation, research and quality of living, green economy, I think those were wonderful things," Contractor said.

Full Article and Video



BoostCompanies
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

BoostCompanies

You've probably seen inspirational quotes that encourage you to get out and do something different or even strange. But getting out of your routine is just difficult.

I searched online to find a camp where I could learn more about business. I wanted to expand my boundaries and meet new people that had similar interests as me. But I was also terrified.

At the camp we learned about finance, accounting, insurance, etc. But the most intriguing topic was marketing. Professor Marc Kalan was incredible. He taught in both a unique and traditional way that actually required us to stay attentive. This meant following his request for electronics to be turned off while he was speaking. He didn't use slides. He said that slides just made audiences stare at a screen and read words, but it didn't make them think, which is important. As he states in his article In the Digital Age, the Ability to Deliver a Speech Remains Powerful, PowerPoint is a "disengaging format of slides . . . rather than speech supplant[ing] the individual as the focal point of corporate communication."

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Washington Post
Washington D.C.
Monday, August 29, 2016

I shouldn’t tell you this. Publicity will only make the problem worse. But you deserve to know: Tax cheating is about to rise in the United States. Now, there are at least two counterarguments to my dire prediction: Fewer business transactions are done in cash today, so they’re harder to hide; and, relatedly, in the era of “Big Data,” there’s more third-party information for the IRS to check to figure out if people are cheating, opinion writer Kathrine Rampell writes, citing research presented at New York University School of Law in April by Rutgers Business School professor Jay Soled and Tulane University professor James Alm.

To read the entire piece:



Newark, NJ
Sunday, August 28, 2016

Asbury Park Press

When Terina McKinney of Camden displays her leather bags and belts at events attended primarily by black women, they are often interested in her designs, and in her experience as an African-American business owner. But she seldom makes sales.

While calls have been increasing for black consumers to support black-owned businesses with their buying power estimated at more than $1.2 trillion a year, social media campaigns with momentum like #buyblack are relatively new.

The factors can be logistical or practical, such as being located farther away or having higher prices than big chain stories, retail experts and civic leaders say.

Businesses that provide a service may have more success than those that sell merchandise, said Jerome Williams, a marketing professor at Rutgers University.

“Since service businesses tend to involve more people interactions, the people relationships should prove to be more important, compared to situations where the focus is primarily on the product,” he said.

Full Article



New China TV
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

New China TV

The abnormal 2016 presidential election: Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton?

Farok Contractor, Distinguished Professor, Department of Management & Global Business, was interviewed on New China TV, the official YouTube channel for Xinhua News Agency.

The 2016 presidential election is quite different in many ways, controversial candidates, unhappy voters, rifted Parties. Check the video to see what people are saying about the two candidates.



Chicago Tribune
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, August 22, 2016

Chicago Tribune

McDonald's plan to get kids active by providing them with fitness trackers ended almost as quickly as it started. The fast food company replaced the toys in its Happy Meals with pedometers, but soon scrapped the devices after "limited" reports surfaced that they could irritate children's skin.

But even before the devices raised safety concerns — "Nothing is more important to us than the safety of our customers," a spokeswoman said — they sparked mockery and anger from some customers who called attention to the apparent hypocrisy of McDonald's encouraging children to exercise while also serving them high-fat foods.

Indeed, the paradox of a fitness monitor wedged in a Happy Meal box alongside chicken nuggets and French fries is hard to ignore.

Jerry Kim, a Management & Global Business professor at Rutgers Business School, said consumers are savvy enough to differentiate when a company's actions are for the good of society and when they are simply veiled attempts to pad their bottom line. Even situations where the motivation may be murky open the door to scrutiny from customers. An obvious example is the common practice among hotel chains to urge customers to re-use bath towels. Do they really want to save the planet, or just save on their energy costs?

When corporate social responsibility "is perfectly aligned with a company's strategic interest, then the motivation for that activity is not clear," Kim said. "If it also helps you, then people don't know if you're doing it for the greater good or for your own self-interest."

Full Article



New China TV
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, August 18, 2016

New China TV

"Globalization today is under attack," Farok Contractor said in an interview posted on New China TV, the official YouTube channel for Xinhua News Agency. "It's very unfortunate because globalization is the vehicle that has lifted 1 billion people out of poverty during the last 15 years and into a middle class status."

Xinhua News Agency interviewed Farok Contractor, a distinguished professor at Rutgers Business School, about the challenge for world leaders gathering in China next month for the G20 Summit.

Contractor, who teaches international business, said communication and coordination will be key tasks for leaders from the 20 most powerful economies in the world as they contemplate new policies in Hangzhou. Read more of Professor Contractor's expertise in "What's driving the Chinese and world stock markets?"

While the benefits of globalization may not be equally distributed, Contractor argues that they still outweigh the costs. It will be up to the G20 leaders to effectively communicate that trade and foreign direct investment are good, he said.

During the interview, Professor Contractor also offered some ideas for how the G20 can coordinate and encourage innovation.

See the full story:



Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, August 15, 2016

The Journal of the Global Accounting Alliance

Why CPAs and organizations need to learn to use advanced technology to predict and achieve outcomes.

As technology continues to evolve, it promotes changes to business models and surprises those who are unprepared. Businesses change their strategies and the way they operate. New threats and opportunities arise. In an increasingly data-driven world, CPAs need to be able to adapt to these technological disruptions.

CPAs now often find themselves performing tasks that require skills in data analytics.

In an effort to advance the use of analytics in auditing, the AICPA and Rutgers Business School in December 2015 announced the Rutgers AICPA Data Analytics Research Initiative (raw.rutgers.edu/radar.html) focusing on integrating analytics into the audit process and on defining how analytics can be used to enhance audit quality.

Full Article



greenliving
Newark, NJ
Thursday, August 11, 2016

greenliving

The Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School Newark, and the Governance & Accountability Institute announce their second program in the two-day learning and knowledge-sharing curriculum leading to a Certificate in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).

The theme is "Good to Great -- Building a Best-in-Class CSR Department."  This session builds on the success of the introductory program held in May 2016.

The Fall program will be on September 28 and 29, 2016 at the Rutgers Business School campus in downtown Newark, New Jersey.  Registration opened this week for the two-day course.

An outstanding group of keynoters, panel moderators and speakers is lining up for the program.  Participants will have a choice of two tracks -- one for corporate responsibility topics and the other for not-for-profit / social sector organization topics, with plenary sessions to share knowledge and experience with all participants.

Full Article



mbaMission
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, August 11, 2016

https://www.mbamission.com/blog/2016/08/11/diamonds-in-the-rough-ivy-league-experience-for-a-public-school-price-at-rutgers-5/?tc=eml

MBA applicants can get carried away with rankings. In this series, we profile amazing programs at business schools that are typically ranked outside the top 15.

Benefiting from the prestige of its parent university, the eighth oldest university in the United States, Rutgers Business School (RBS) offers a suite of flexible curricular options and formal concentrations that are rooted in its multidisciplinary strength.

In the past, the school has marketed its MBA program as the “same education as an Ivy League School, at a fraction of the price”—a claim that seems substantiated by robust industry connections across several disciplines, a network of more than 33,000 alumni, and a high employment rate (98.3% of its Class of 2015 MBAs were employed 90 days after graduation, even more than the 93.5% seen for the Class of 2014).

In 2015, U.S. News & World Report named Rutgers the best public MBA program in the New York City area, and in 2016, it ranked the school 53rd among all MBA programs in the country.

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Newark, NJ
Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Endo Pharma

"We are excited to announce the addition of Joe to the Endo executive team. His industry experience is extensive and includes building commercial businesses, leading multi-function organizations and achieving stellar results across primary care, specialty and rare disease markets. His proven track record of success across nearly 20 product launches and the commercialization of more than 70 products will be instrumental as we continue to focus on strategically growing our U.S. Branded business," said Rajiv De Silva, president and CEO of Endo.

Ciaffoni holds a B.A. in communications and an M.B.A. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Full Article



Boston Herald
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Boston Herald

When Terina McKinney displays her leather bags and belts at events attended primarily by Black women, they are often interested in her designs, and in her experience as an African-American business owner. But she seldom makes sales.

Businesses that provide a service may have more success than those that sell merchandise, says Jerome Williams, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School.

"Since service businesses tend to involve more people interactions, the people relationships should prove to be more important, compared to situations where the focus is primarily on the product," he says.

Small and medium-sized retailers can find it hard to compete on price and selection with giants such as Wal-Mart that can negotiate lower prices with manufacturers through their scale. And finding Black retailers and service providers across a range of industries isn't always easy, Jerome Williams says.

"As a Black consumer, if I wanted to buy from a Black-owned merchant, there aren't enough to satisfy my needs," he says.

Full Article