In the Media

Rutgers Today
Newark, NJ
Thursday, March 23, 2017

Rutgers Today

A team of Rutgers Business School students and one alumna won first prize in the regional Hult Prize Challenge with an idea of operating a system of electric-powered rickshaws in refugee settlements.

Seniors Najeeha "Gia" Farooqi, Moneeb Mian, Hasan Usmani and alumna Hanaa Lakhani captured the top prize in the March 4 competition against 70 teams from such schools as Harvard, Yale, Princeton and the London School of Economics.

In a six-minute pitch – polished by months of preparation – the team detailed a compelling plan for Roshni Rides, a business to provide electric-powered rickshaws in refugee settlements, offering residents an affordable, hop-on, hop-off way of traveling to jobs, schools and vital services, including hospitals and markets. 

Passengers would use reloadable ride cards similar to the New York City subway's Metro card. The team plans to pilot the system in Orangi Town, where an estimated 1.2 million people live within Pakistan’s port city of Karachi.

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Westfield, NJ
Wednesday, March 22, 2017

American Entrepreneurship

The students are the first team from Rutgers to win the regional competition in Boston. 

Now they will work with mentors to refine their business plan, fundraise and pilot their business, all before facing off against four other teams from around the world vying for a $1 million prize.

A team of Rutgers Business School students and one alumna won first prize in the regional Hult Prize Challenge with an idea of operating a system of electric-powered rickshaws in refugee settlements.

Seniors Najeeha "Gia" Farooqi, Moneeb Mian, Hasan Usmani and alumna Hanaa Lakhani captured the top prize in the March 4 competition against 70 teams from such schools as Harvard, Yale, Princeton and the London School of Economics.

In a six-minute pitch – polished by months of preparation – the team detailed a compelling plan for Roshni Rides, a business to provide electric-powered rickshaws in refugee settlements, offering residents an affordable, hop-on, hop-off way of traveling to jobs, schools and vital services, including hospitals and markets. 

Passengers would use reloadable ride cards similar to the New York City subway's Metro card. The team plans to pilot the system in Orangi Town, where an estimated 1.2 million people live within Pakistan’s port city of Karachi.

"We've worked very hard," said Farooqi, who like the other team members are Americans of Pakistani ancestry. "This is very personal for us. We are the sons and daughters of immigrants and refugees."

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New Brunswick and Newark, NJ
Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The Daily Targum

A team of three Rutgers Business School students and one alumna have made history when they became the first winning regional champions from Rutgers University in the Hult Prize competition.

The Hult Prize Foundation is a not-for-profit organization encouraging college students to create and present their own unique and innovative business ideas to solve some of the world's biggest challenges. Winners of the entire competition receive $1 million in seed capital to bring their idea to life, according to the Hult Prize website.

"This year's challenge was about refugees around the world. How to create sustainable, and scalable social enterprises that empower the rights and dignity of 10 million refugees by 2022," said Umair Masood, campus director of the Rutgers Hult Prize Challenge Team and a School of Arts and Sciences junior.

The Rutgers team consisted of Rutgers Business School seniors Najeeha Farooqi, Moneeb Mian and Hasan Usmani and alumna Hanaa Lakhani. The team first won the competition at Rutgers before proceeding to win regionals in Boston. Their prize-winning idea was about operating a system of electric-powered rickshaws in refugee settlements, Masood said.

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New York, NY
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

30 Under 30

THOMASNET.com® and the Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) are pleased to sponsor the third annual 30 Under 30 Rising Supply Chain Stars Recognition Program. We seek to acknowledge young purchasing/supply chain management professionals who deserve to be applauded for their passion, creativity and contributions to supply chain.

Abhishek Dahiya, RBS MBA ‘14Abhishek Dahiya, RBS MBA ‘14
Dell Technologies
Round Rock, Texas

 

Tianhou Zhong, RBS BS ‘13Tianhou Zhong, RBS BS ‘13
Coach, Inc.
New York, NY

 

Leveraging the Internet of things (IoT) to foster supply chain innovation, delivering over $16 million in cost savings, transforming processes to save 450 work hours per week and reducing expedited freight costs by over 70 percent are just a few of the outstanding personal achievements of this year’s winners in the THOMASNET.com® and Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) 30 Under 30 Rising Supply Chain Stars Recognition Program.

"Our 30 Under 30 winners are fast becoming leaders in the digital industrial economy," said Tony Uphoff, President and CEO of Thomas Publishing Company. "They combine talent, innovation and technological savvy in their work and we are excited to honor them as true role models for millennials in supply chain management."

Since 2014, the 30 Under 30 Rising Supply Chain Stars program has recognized individuals who have demonstrated leadership, innovation, collaboration, and other outstanding attributes. The program, which became global for the first time in 2016, is designed to provide role models and position supply chain and procurement as a viable and exciting career choice for early career professionals.

Press Release



Short Hills, NJ
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

dun & bradstreet B2B

Lyneir Richardson is a full-time faculty member at Rutgers Business School in Newark, NJ. He is leading new programs focused on helping minority entrepreneurs get capital from public sources and private investors in his role as Executive Director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED), a research and practitioner oriented center at Rutgers University.

He is also a lifelong entrepreneur. In the 1990s, the U.S. Small Business Administration named him a "Young Entrepreneur of the Year." Richardson is now the CEO of The Chicago TREND Corporation, a social enterprise aiming to stimulate retail development that will strengthen city neighborhoods. This startup recently received over $7 million of seed capital to launch operations and invest in catalytic real estate projects.

"Focus on being profitable, first," he said. "It is admirable that so many minority entrepreneurs want to make the world better, but the only way to have a business that survives and can scale is to be consistently profitable."

Full Article



New York, NY
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

NJBIZ

U.S. News & World Report revealed its 2018 rankings of the nation's best graduate schools on Tuesday, rating 100 or more colleges and universities in a variety of programs.

Based on the rankings, New Jersey is well-represented in a number of fields, including business, law, medicine and more.

Among the nation's best business schools, Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick tied for No. 50 with the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University.

Rutgers ranked tops among New Jersey colleges.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

NJBIZ

Karen Kessler, the founder and president of Evergreen PR, has been named the chair of the executive business cabinet at the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School, the institute announced.

Kessler is known for her sound counsel and approach to handling ethical dilemmas faced by a high-profile client base. In January, she was named to the NJBIZ Power 100 list.

James Abruzzo, co-founder of the institute, said in a statement that he feels Kessler's experience will be a huge plus for the institute.

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Newark, NJ
Thursday, March 9, 2017

New Jersey 101.5

If you have their app, there's a free cup of coffee waiting for you at Wawa every Friday morning in March.

In its New York market, medium coffee only costs a $1 on the day after the New York Rangers win, if ordered using their app.

The offers are the latest in the "app wars" between coffee and convenience stores, including McDonald's, Starbucks and 7-Eleven.

"Coffee is the intro. It's the opportunity to leverage the power of the coffee, the power of the caffeine, the taste, the convenience and the flexibility it may have with the hope that folks will come back and buy other higher margin, higher profit products," said Sandy Becker, professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School.

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Sydney, Australia
Thursday, March 9, 2017

What's On Sydney

Lighthouse Lecture Series: US and European Perspectives on Diversity Management and Inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are central to Australian multiculturalism and essential to our organizations. And what better way to recognize Harmony Day on Tuesday 21 March than by exploring US and European perspectives on diversity management and inclusion.

Join Professor S Bruce Dowton, Vice-Chancellor, Macquarie University and internationally recognised scholars Professor Alain Klarsfeld, Research Professor, Toulouse Business School and Professor Nancy DiTomaso, Distinguished Professor of Management and Global Business, Rutgers Business School, as they explore issues of diversity and inclusion as seen in France and the USA, respectively.

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Identities.Mic
New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Identities.Mic

President Donald Trump wants to ban refugees from entering the United States. But these Rutgers Business School students want to help refugees live with dignity.

Rutgers Business School seniors Gia Farooqi, Hasan Usmani, Moneeb Mian and alumna Hana Lakhani — who are all Muslim — pitched Roshni Rides to the international social entrepreneurship competition Hult Prize for a $1 million prize.

The group won the regional finals of the competition in March, out of 50,000 applicants, coincidentally a few days before Trump announced a new executive order for a 120-day ban on refugees entering the U.S. The team beat out schools like Harvard, Yale and Purdue, and is one of five regional winners across the world, Umair Masood, Rutgers' campus director for the Hult Prize, said in an email.

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Newark, NJ
Monday, March 6, 2017

New Jersey 101.5

The Assembly Regulatory Oversight and Reform and Federal Relations Committee could vote in the coming weeks on a proposed measure to create new liquor licenses for restaurants.

To better understand the issue, the panel has reached out to several experts for testimony, including Rutgers Business School finance professor Morris Davis, who is also the director of the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers.

He pointed out there are certain areas in New Jersey where are liquor licenses are plentiful, and the cost of those licenses is relatively inexpensive, but in other areas licenses are extremely scarce.

"The cost of a liquor license in those areas could be $500,000 or more, so the problem is there's no mechanism to enable budding restaurant owners to acquire a license at a reasonable price in areas where there's clearly a demand for restaurants," he said.

Full article



FiOS News 1
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

FiOS News 1

On this edition of "This is Jersey with Gary Gellman," they report on the 80th Annual New Jersey State Chamber of Commerce Walk to Washington.

For 79 years, Chamber members have boarded a special Amtrak charter train and traveled to the nation's Capital to discuss with the state's top political leadership how to make New Jersey a better place to do business.

The event has grown to include corporate executives, mid-size business owners, entrepreneurs, state government and legislative leaders who network with each other and discuss New Jersey's economic situation with the Congressional Delegation.

During the train ride to Washington, DC, Andy Gogates, corporate relations manager, Rutgers Business School MBA program, is interviewed: begins at 11:17  https://youtu.be/7ajgNHlYgkg?t=11m17s into the video.

The tradition began in 1937 when several of the state's top business executives took a train to Washington to have dinner with New Jersey's congressional delegation - and the rest is history. Soon the event's popularity made it necessary to charter a private train to the nation's capital. And because everyone on the train walks the aisles, discussing issues and opportunities the event became known as the Walk to Washington.

Watch the video



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

NJBIZ

The Institute for Ethical Leadership at the Rutgers Business School announced it has appointed Dr. Joanne B. Ciulla its newest academic director.

Ciulla will also become professor of leadership ethics at Rutgers Business School's Department of Management and Global Business.

"I was attracted to Rutgers because I saw great potential in the Institute for Ethical Leadership to serve the academic, business, nonprofit and government communities," Ciulla said.

"We are pleased and consider ourselves fortunate to have attracted Joanne to the IEL," James Abruzzo, institute co-founder, said. "Her values, energy and desire to make the IEL a significant force for good are aligned with ours."

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NJBIZ

 

Newark, NJ
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

NJBIZ

The Black and Latino Tech Initiative, a collaborative program with the goal to aid early-stage companies with black and Latino co-founders with viable business models, will launch this week in Newark, organizers said.

Mukesh Patel, the entrepreneur in residence and executive coach, said the group aims to give resources and mentorship to these early-stage companies in an effort to help them gain traction and attract more private capital and gain admission into quality accelerators.

"We're building relationships with (venture capitalists), angels and accelerators committed to investing in quality teams of color," Patel said.

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Newark, NJ
Monday, February 27, 2017

Black Enterprise

On March 2, Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development will hold its Black and Latino Tech Initiative Launch (BLT). The free event (registration is required) offers black and Hispanic tech entrepreneurs valuable advice on preparing their businesses for an accelerator program as well as on-site networking opportunities with venture capitalists and accelerators.

"Less than 2% of all technology startups are led by black or Latino individuals," says CUEED executive director Lyneir Richardson. "The reasons for this are two-fold: black and Latino entrepreneurs have difficulty securing capital, and they also have challenges building business teams that get accepted into top tier accelerators. Our BLT Launch event will seek to remedy this situation by providing scientists, inventors, and technology innovators with essential info that will give their ideas a chance to be developed, funded, and launched into the marketplace."

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WalletHub

 

Newark, NJ
Saturday, February 18, 2017

WalletHub

Ask the Experts

John Longo, professor of professional practice in the finance & economics at Rutgers Business School

What was your first credit card? How was the experience? What would you change?

My first credit card was from Discover Card. In the 1990s it was one of the few credit cards that gave you cash back. I liked the notion of getting a credit card that paid you cash and had no annual fee. It was a good experience since I tried to pay my bill in full each month.

When do you recommend people get their first credit card?

I would recommend people get a credit card with a low limit (e.g., $500), as soon as they understand the fundamentals of money and banking. This might be as early as 16 for a high school student that is responsible with money, or in your late teens to early 20's for a college age person. A high school student would likely need a parent to co-sign for the card. Having a credit card and using it responsibly can help you develop a credit score, which will be important for future large purchases, such as obtaining a car loan or mortgage.

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Yahoo Finance
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Yahoo Finance

M&T Bank and Rutgers Business School have launched a new partnership for the second annual Rutgers Business School New Jersey County College Case Competition, with M&T serving as the presenting sponsor of this year's competition.

In addition to financial support for the competition, M&T will offer their bankers as advisers to participating community college students throughout New Jersey. Established by Rutgers Business School in 2016, the competition requires students to analyze a real-life business case and present their findings and recommendations to a panel of Rutgers Business School judges.

"We look forward to developing a strong strategic partnership with M&T Bank and working together to train students of every background to become tomorrow's business leaders," said Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.

Robert Kurland, associate dean of undergraduate programs at Rutgers Business School-Newark, added: "With the support of M&T Bank, we are able to extend an invitation to additional county colleges which allows more students the opportunity to gain real-world business experience and showcases some of the best future business leaders in New Jersey."

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On The Banks

 

New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, February 13, 2017

On Rhe Banks

With all the hoopla of National Signing Day behind us, I had a chance to catch up with, Burlington Township’s and 2017 Scarlet Knight Signee, Everett Wormley for an exclusive interview for all of our “On the Banks” fans to get to know Ev a little better. To see my scouting report on Wormley, simply click here.

What was it about Rutgers University, outside of Football related reasons, that helped you make your decision to attend school there?

Rutgers Business School is elite, and since I want to major in marketing it was a good match. Plus New York City being so close presented great internship opportunities.

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Crain's
New York, NY
Sunday, February 12, 2017

Crain's New York Business

Recent political events may have provided an opening for Uber's competitors to take a bite out of the ride-sharing service's dominance in New York. During demonstrations at JFK Airport two weeks ago over President Donald Trump's travel ban, Uber's response was regarded by some to be more in league with the White House than with the protesters, and a #DeleteUber campaign went viral. In the aftermath, more than 200,000 customers shut down their accounts, The New York Times reported. That led to a related bump in downloads for Lyft and two other apps, Via and Juno.

"This is a great opportunity for Lyft, particularly in this industry, where it's not really clear that Uber's services are much different from the others," said Michael Barnett, a professor of management at Rutgers Business School. "Lyft has gotten customers to try their app who probably wouldn't have bothered to switch if it wasn't for this."

Full Article



 

Brick, NJ
Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Asbury Park Press

Bob's Video Time will close on Saturday after 27 years, its owners said this week, admitting that they had no answers left for technology that was making their store obsolete.

Bob and Donna Karpodinis said they didn't want to close; they are too young to retire. But consumers can watch anything they want without leaving their home. The holiday shopping season fizzled. And they decided to pull the plug.

Artists still make movies. Consumers still watch them. But "in today's world, the technology has become one that has disenfranchised local merchants that delivered that content," said Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"Video stores no longer service a need that's significant," Rutgers' Kalan said. "I would commend whoever ran the Brick store that they outlasted virtually (everyone else)."

Full Article