In the Media

Fairfield, NJ
Tuesday, December 12, 2017

New Jersey Business

More than a dozen commercial real estate industry leaders detailed public policy recommendations for 2018 at a special gubernatorial transition program hosted by NAIOP NJ, the Commercial Real Estate Development Association. The program was planned to identify top priorities for the incoming Governor Phil Murphy and his administration.

Proposals included preserving and improving the state's incentive programs, standardizing local land-use procedures, creating sites for industrial projects, particularly in the Port Newark-Elizabeth region, and expanding successful efforts to streamline environmental regulations.

"Across the U.S., 96 percent of the land is available for development – it's just not where it needs to be," said Morris Davis, academic director of the Center for Real Estate  at Rutgers Business School. "This is particularly true in New Jersey." Morris chaired the coalition's committee that examined the state's land shortage, and looked at "what we can do to make more land to meet increased demand for warehouse, distribution and logistics space, particularly in the port district."

Recommendations range from: repurposing government-owned facilities in strategic locations to the state taking a proactive role in acquiring adjacent privately held properties; utilizing incentives to encourage owners to sell; and taking a lead role in the clean-up of environmental contamination to redevelop the sites.

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ROI-NJ
Newark, NJ
Friday, December 8, 2017

Return on Information New Jersey

The Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School has announced eight Institute for Ethical Leadership Research Fellows.

The full-time Rutgers Business School faculty members conduct research and/or teaching in areas related to business ethics, leadership ethics and corporate social responsibility.

They will meet regularly throughout the academic year to discuss their research, serve as advisers who shape the direction of research and other IEL activities, and contribute to the institute's programs.

"The establishment of eight research fellows at the Institute for Ethical Leadership reflects Rutgers Business School's longstanding emphasis on the study of ethics and its importance in the education and success of all business leaders," Rutgers Business School Dean Lei Lei said. "We look forward to hearing more about the work of the inaugural fellows and the impact their work will have on leadership development and corporate citizenship."

"I'm honored to be a part of this great group of scholars, and look forward to working together over the coming years to develop valuable insights into how to improve the important relationship between business and society," said Mike Barnett, one of the eight fellows and a former dean for academic programs.

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Newark, NJ
Wednesday, December 6, 2017

American City & County

It's tough to overstate the contribution of small businesses to the U.S. economy. They comprise 99.7 percent of American employer firms and 64 percent of net new private sector jobs, according to a 2012 U.S. Small Business Administration report.

"There are millions of businesses throughout the country," says Jeffrey Robinson, a professor of management and entrepreneurship at the Rutgers Business School.

"And then of course, they get concentrated in cities and urban areas because there's more people there, there's more commerce and activity taking place there."

This can present economic challenges for smaller and rural municipalities. However, one expert argues that the traditional economic development model in cities is shifting.

Small cities are finding particular success in small business development and retention through a model used by the private sector as well — business incubators.

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Newark Venture Partners



Metro MBA
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Metro MBA

MBA graduates looking to apply their skills to a fast-growing and high-paying career may be interested in pursuing a role in Pricing Analysis. Named among the 100 best jobs in America by CNN, working as a Pricing Analyst is a perfect way for an MBA graduate to make use of their strong education combining skills in marketing, finance, and analytics.

With a predicted 10-year job growth of 41.2 percent and roughly 280,000 total jobs available, business students who think they might be interested this fast-growing career can start preparing while still in school through specialized study in marketing or finance. Armed with the special skills in data analysis in addition to the strong business background of an MBA, students looking to enter the field after graduation will have a competitive advantage as they begin their career.

While most MBA programs do not offer a direct concentration in pricing analysis, a number of programs still provide specialized pricing education through other departments, like finance and business analytics. Below are just a few examples of pricing-related courses available at some of the top MBA programs in the country:

Scheller College of Business – Georgia Institute of Technology

The Wharton School – University of Pennsylvania

Rutgers School of Business, Newark and New Brunswick

The MBA program at Rutgers’ Newark and New Brunswick location offers a class in Supply Chain Pricing Strategy. The course recognizes the importance of pricing in driving profits and the extreme negative impact poor pricing decisions can have. Students will learn how to approach pricing from both a strategic and tactical level and be able to apply it to a number of fields and industries.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, December 5, 2017

The Daily Targum

Veteran undergraduate students make up roughly 4 percent of the student body. Because of this, the Rutgers Business School now offers a Mini-MBA: Business Management for Military and Veterans program that serves veterans, transitioning military personnel, ROTC students and undergraduate students returning from military service, according to RBS's site.

Margaret O' Donnell, the program manager with Rutgers Business School, said the program is customized for veterans transitioning into the workforce, helping them make sound business decisions in their careers. The model for the Mini-MBA program is roughly equivalent to a 3-credit course present in a full scale MBA program.

She said the program offers classes in a compact format, starting on Monday morning and finishing Friday afternoon. It is a full-day course, and each topic is taught by a different instructor for 3.5 hours. For example, leadership is covered by one instructor and later the same day a different instructor covers a different topic such as human resources.

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Poets&Quants
New York, NY
Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Poets & Quants for Undergrads

There's no doubt that employability is the reason why more undergrads major in business than any other subject. At least at the leading schools, the stats show convincingly that an undergraduate degree pays off. But do graduates get the jobs they really want in their desired industries and target companies?

The industry test was easier to meet. A majority of alumni at every single school surveyed by Poets&Quants landed jobs in their chosen industry.

The ultimate test of a business school for many students, however, may well be something that meets an even higher standard: Leveraging your educational experience to land a job in a specific company you really want to work for. Most of the leading business schools have an excellent track record of helping their graduates achieve this more challenging goal. No school, for example, achieved a success rate above 90%. But several came awfully close to that impressive mark.

Rutgers Business School - New Brunswick    87.3%
Rutgers Business School - Newark    77.9%

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Real Estate NJ
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 4, 2017

Real Estate NJ

It's the type of requirement that public officials might often dream about: A global company wants to open a 1 million-square-foot distribution or manufacturing center just a few miles outside Port Newark-Elizabeth, proposing to bring thousands of high-paying jobs to the state.

There is just one problem — it will be years before the company can put a shovel in the ground.

As the Smart Growth Economic Development Coalition has found, there are just a handful of large-scale, remediated and entitled sites in and around the port region of northern New Jersey. The lack of supply is a glaring problem, the group argues, given the growth trajectory of e-commerce, logistics and other large industrial users that are willing to pay a premium to be here.

"Our comparative advantage is why we're out of space," said Morris Davis, academic director and Paul V. Profeta chair at the Rutgers Center for Real Estate. "There is an opportunity in New Jersey. It's a massive growth opportunity, but how do we take advantage of it?"

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ROI-NJ
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 4, 2017

ROI-NJ

The most important aspect of leadership, Tara Dowdell said, is the ability to inspire and empower.

"People should follow you, not because they are afraid of you, but because they respect and admire you," she said. "It is important to invest in talent and grow the people you work with in order to create strong companies, build loyalty and trust, and ensure that your clients are properly served."

Dowdell, founder, CEO and managing member of Tara Dowdell Group in Jersey City, was one of four CEOs honored with Leadership Excellence Awards at the 4th annual "CEO Evolution" event recently hosted by Citrin Cooperman and Rutgers Business School at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark.

Dan Berkowitz, founder and CEO of CID Entertainment in Philadelphia; Paul Kermizian, co-founder and CEO of the Brooklyn-based Barcade, with locations in Newark and Jersey City; and Chris Lotito, owner, CEO and president of Lotito Foods in Edison, joined Dowdell on a recent panel of local chief executives who were recognized for having evolved into leaders in their respective industries.

Moderated by Wilfredo Fernandez, partner at Citrin Cooperman, the panelists discussed their company strategies and visions while offering lessons learned in leadership, creating and sustaining growth, handling customer service and developing healthy work cultures.

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Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, December 4, 2017

Mark Schaefer Business Grow
This is the time of year marketing bloggers make the prediction that "this is the year of social video" (for the tenth year in a row!).

But I can't help but make some predictions — thinking about what's coming next is my professional fuel!  I love to connect the dots in new ways and dream about the implications and what the new year will hold for us.

Let's look beyond the obvious trends at some developments percolating below the surface that will impact marketing in 2018 and beyond. Hopefully these are some new ideas for the marketing trend grist mill … let me know what you think!

Mark Schaefer teaches Rutgers Business School Executive Education Mini-MBA: Digital Marketing

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, December 4, 2017

The Daily Targum

On Nov. 28, Rutgers Business School hosted the Business Leadership Speaker Series featuring Basic Outfitters, an online service that allows customers to buy basic clothes essentials inexpensively.

In the past, the event featured many well-known company heads, such as Bed Bath & Beyond CEO Steven Temares, Johnson & Johnson CPO Len DeCandia, DEVCO President Chris Paladino and Revlon & Elizabeth Arden SVP Rahul Mehrotra. 

Can Uslay, an associate professor of Marketing, director of Special Projects of the Rutgers Business School (RBS) and organizer of the Business Leader Speaker Series, said the goal of the series is "to expose our students to a variety of pathways to success."

"We do not want the series to be dominated by one or few tracks. Many of the speakers are also RBS or Rutgers alums which helps them relate to our students and our students to them. All speakers participate in the series gratis and that can also be a factor in some cases," Uslay said.

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YAHOO! Finance
New York, NY
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

YAHOO! Finance

TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank®, today announced the appointment of Nick Miceli to Regional President, Florida. Miceli will oversee TD Bank's commercial, retail, small business, specialty banking operations and lending services throughout the state.

"I'm thrilled to take on this role to further our increasing business in Florida," said Miceli. "Our team in Florida has achieved significant growth, and I look forward to joining the team. Similarly, I'm quite eager to engage with our communities throughout Florida, and partner to provide our local customers, businesses and organizations with the support and service they've come to expect from TD."

A passionate community leader, Miceli serves on several boards, including The New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Special Olympics New Jersey, Rutgers Business School, WBGO Newark Public Radio, Jazz House Kids and Caucus Education Corporation.

Miceli holds a bachelor's degree in business management and marketing from Rutgers University.

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FindMBA
Newark, NJ
Monday, November 27, 2017

Find MBA

An MBA is a significant investment, in terms of both time and money. But the rewards for MBA graduates can make for compelling reasons for undertaking an MBA program.

And the rewards can be more substantial than just a salary bump. An MBA can obviously help you advance in your career, but it can also help you develop an international network, get leadership skills, and even make a difference in the world. 

Here are some of the most common reasons why people do an MBA.

1. To launch an international career
2. To shift sectors or functional areas
3. To gain international exposure
4. To gain new skills and knowledge
5. To be the boss
6. To grow your network
7. To get a pay raise

"And, of course, the salary increase is important," says Doyle.

As well as offering significant opportunities for professional and personal growth, MBA programs offer a good chance for a raise post-graduation.

For those who have attended world-class MBA programs, pay bumps are verifiable, and substantial. 

In the most recent Financial Times Global MBA ranking, for instance, MBA graduates from Rutgers Business School reported that three years after graduation, they had increased their salaries by 130 percent, on average.

8. To make a difference

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Ivy Exec
Newark, NJ
Monday, November 27, 2017

Ivy Exec

"The unraveling of the human genome and the emergence of precision medicine are opening up new avenues for targeted therapies to tackle the most challenging diseases."

Such were the words of Dr. Mitch Morris, Deloitte Consulting's U.S./global healthcare sector leader, in an article published December 2016.

He added, "But this all comes with a high price tag."

This is the environment healthcare is in today, and the industry is badly in need of leaders who will upend prevailing management practices. Amid regulatory changes, complex health delivery systems, and exciting new treatments, Dr. Morris rightly observed, "[T]he status quo will not do; fundamental changes in our approach to managing the costs of healthcare are required."

For healthcare professionals looking to effectively disrupt the way their companies are managed and work their way up the career ladder, we've compiled a list of the top Executive MBA programs from Ivy Exec's 2017 Best Executive MBA Program rankings. The programs in this list attract the most students from the pharma/healthcare sector.

Topping the list is the Fisher Executive MBA program from the Ohio State University's Fisher College of Business.

Coming in at second with 25% of its students from the healthcare industry is the Villanova Executive MBA program from Villanova University's School of Business in Pennsylvania.

Third in the list is the Rutgers Executive MBA program from the Rutgers Business School in New Jersey, with 22% of students from the pharma, biotech, and healthcare fields. Especially created for busy executives, this 20-month program is a suitable learning option for healthcare managers and executives who want to remain working while studying for an MBA.

The Rutgers EMBA program (Ivy Exec's REMBA page) has consistently been ranked as one of the best in the world by the Financial Times since 2011. Of the Rutgers faculty members whose mission is to provide a nimble curriculum that rapidly adapts to the changing times, 85% have doctorates.

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Bloomberg
New York, NY
Monday, November 27, 2017

Bloomberg

Tom Szaky, the founder of TerraCycle, a New Jersey-based garbage startup, has built a $24 million business around the belief that everything is recyclable. He's convinced some of the world's largest brands and retailers, including Procter & Gamble Co., Colgate-Palmolive Co. and Office Depot Inc., that there's value in spending to keep garbage out of landfills.

The challenge is to make this lifestyle broad and reflexive. It starts with an evaluation of cost during a product's complete life cycle, said Kevin Lyons, a professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School.

A consumer pays twice: to buy and to dispose. A manufacturer can reduce, or even eliminate that second spend, and reap its own savings with thoughtful early design.

"There are companies that are now seeing there is a value-add to doing what Tom is asking them to do," Lyons said.

Full Article



The Star Online
Petaling Jaya
Thursday, November 23, 2017

The Star Online

Tencent Holdings senior executive vice president [and Rutgers Executive MBA alumnus] SY Lau said Malaysian academic institutions must play their part in producing new research findings, amid the rapid growth of the fourth industrial revolution.

"We are counting on our universities to be the arsenal to produce new research findings, working together with industry players surrounding them," he said during his keynote address at Malaysia Higher Education Forum 2017 at Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre on Thursday.

"[W]hat about integrating practical experience into the core curriculum by making it mandatory that 30% of our academics staff be former practitioners of their specialty in the professional world," he said.

He said such measures would ensure that Malaysia produce talents that will be relevant to the needs of the industry, as practiced by one of the leading American public research institutions, Rutgers University.

"More than 40% of the faculty members from Rutgers Business School are ex-practitioners, including the part-time professors," he said.

Full Article



New York, NY
Thursday, November 23, 2017

The Conversation

As Americans sit down to their Thanksgiving Day feasts, some may recall the story of the "Pilgrim Fathers" who founded one of the first English settlements in North America in 1620, at what is today the town of Plymouth, Massachusetts.

What many Americans don't realize, however, is that the story of those early settlers' struggle, which culminated in what we remember today as the first Thanksgiving feast, is also a tale of globalization, many centuries before the word was even coined.

Crossing the Atlantic began a century before the Pilgrims' passage to the New World aboard the Mayflower. By the 1600s, trans-Atlantic travel had become increasingly common. It was because of globalization that those first settlers were able to survive in an inhospitable and unforgiving land.

Two short stories will help me [Farok Contractor] explain. As a professor of international business in the Management and Global Business department at Rutgers Business School, I have been fascinated by the history of trade going back millennia, and how most Americans do not know the background story of Thanksgiving Day.

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ROI-NJ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, November 21, 2017

ROI-NJ

For all the campaign talk about funding pensions, sanctuary cities and legalizing marijuana, the business community knows one issue will dictate the success or failure of the next governor’s administration: economic development and job creation.

While Gov.-elect Phil Murphy spent the past six months campaigning, the Smart Growth Economic Development Coalition, a nearly 50-member group filled with experts in all areas of real estate development, met on a regular basis to formulate a detailed proposal of recommendations before the inauguration. The group created a detailed plan, together with corresponding draft legislation, regulation and executive orders that will be delivered to both Gov.-elect Murphy and the new Legislature.

The Smart Growth Economic Development Coalition has set its sights on four areas where state and local government must pave the way for the private sector and labor to create the volume of housing units and commercial premises that will be essential to New Jersey's economic growth in the years ahead:

Public incentives;
Local land-use law;
Regulations; and
Shortage of land.

SHORTAGE OF LAND: It takes a state to create space

The chair: Morris Davis, academic director for Rutgers Center for Real Estate at the Rutgers Business School

New Jersey needs a concerted effort at every level of government to assist the private sector in "making land." In other words, the state needs to eliminate or reduce the hurdles inherent in remediating, assembling and entitling large-tract sites. For starters, land held by public and quasi-public agencies in strategically located areas should be freed up for redevelopment. Examples include salt domes and DPW maintenance yards along valuable roadways when comparable alternatives are available elsewhere.



Newark Patch
Newark, NJ
Saturday, November 18, 2017

Newark Patch

A new report unveiled by Rutgers Business School reports that minority-owned businesses seeking small business loans are treated differently than their white counterparts, despite having identical qualifications on paper. The organization released its study Friday, titled "Shaping Small Business Lending Policy Through Matched Paired Mystery Shopping". The study examines the gap between marketplace policy protections and the reality of the vast majority of small business entrepreneurs.

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Legal Theory Blog

Scott Callahan (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Rutgers Business School), Darius Palia (Rutgers Business School; Center for Contract & Economic Organization), Eric L. Talley (Columbia University - School of Law) have posted Appraisal Arbitrage and Shareholder Value on SSRN

Abstract:

Post-merger appraisal rights have become the focus of heated controversy in mergers and acquisitions law in recent years. Though traditionally perceived as an arcane and cabalistic proceeding, the appraisal action has gained prominence through the ascendancy of appraisal arbitrage—whereby investors purchase target-company shares shortly after an announcement solely to pursue appraisal.

Several commentators have decried appraisal arbitrage as an imposition of unnecessary risks and costs on deal activity and pricing, advancing the position that the liberalization of appraisal reduces/destroys shareholder value.

This paper interrogates such claims, utilizing an auction-design model that delivers several testable implications. We find that—consistent with our model's predictions—the appraisal-liberalizing events of 2007 were associated with a significant increase in deal premia, as the enhanced credibility of appraisal implicitly raised the de facto "reserve price" associated with M&A auctions. We further argue that the nature and extent of these shocks suggest that shareholders likely benefited ex ante from liberalized judicial policies related to appraisal.

Legal Theory Blog

Appraisal Arbitrage and Shareholder Value on SSRN



Newark, NJ
Saturday, November 11, 2017

New Jersey 101.5

Thanksgiving means turkey, stuffing, pumpkin pie — and don't forget Black Friday specials to start the holiday shopping season.

Some stores are already out with their sales, while specials are "leaking" onto the internet via sites like BestBlackFriday.com.

Sandy Becker, professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick and Newark, says the original purpose of Black Friday — to bring extra traffic into stores and malls — has not changed.

Becker said Black Friday sales spilled over into Thanksgiving in the past few years when stores began opening in the afternoon and evening.

"There was a lot of negativity around opening on Thanksgiving Day," Becker said.

"I believe it was last year or two years ago there was a lot of public relations issues … a lot consumers were unhappy not only for opening but forcing their employees to work on Thanksgiving Day and not being with their families."

There are even websites that track which stores WON'T open on Thanksgiving.

But Black Friday isn't likely going away, Becker says, and it remains an opportunity for both online and brick-and-mortar retailers to start the holiday shopping season.

"There's an encouragement to continue to show up in person where there are some sales that are in-store only. There is a wide range of opportunity online as well. There's Cyber Monday, the first Monday after Thanksgiving, with significant sales there," Becker said.

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