In the Media

WalletHub

 

Newark, NJ
Saturday, February 18, 2017

WalletHub

Ask the Experts

John Longo, professor of professional practice in the finance & economics at Rutgers Business School

What was your first credit card? How was the experience? What would you change?

My first credit card was from Discover Card. In the 1990s it was one of the few credit cards that gave you cash back. I liked the notion of getting a credit card that paid you cash and had no annual fee. It was a good experience since I tried to pay my bill in full each month.

When do you recommend people get their first credit card?

I would recommend people get a credit card with a low limit (e.g., $500), as soon as they understand the fundamentals of money and banking. This might be as early as 16 for a high school student that is responsible with money, or in your late teens to early 20's for a college age person. A high school student would likely need a parent to co-sign for the card. Having a credit card and using it responsibly can help you develop a credit score, which will be important for future large purchases, such as obtaining a car loan or mortgage.

Full Article



Yahoo Finance
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Yahoo Finance

M&T Bank and Rutgers Business School have launched a new partnership for the second annual Rutgers Business School New Jersey County College Case Competition, with M&T serving as the presenting sponsor of this year's competition.

In addition to financial support for the competition, M&T will offer their bankers as advisers to participating community college students throughout New Jersey. Established by Rutgers Business School in 2016, the competition requires students to analyze a real-life business case and present their findings and recommendations to a panel of Rutgers Business School judges.

"We look forward to developing a strong strategic partnership with M&T Bank and working together to train students of every background to become tomorrow's business leaders," said Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.

Robert Kurland, associate dean of undergraduate programs at Rutgers Business School-Newark, added: "With the support of M&T Bank, we are able to extend an invitation to additional county colleges which allows more students the opportunity to gain real-world business experience and showcases some of the best future business leaders in New Jersey."

Full Article



On The Banks

 

New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, February 13, 2017

On Rhe Banks

With all the hoopla of National Signing Day behind us, I had a chance to catch up with, Burlington Township’s and 2017 Scarlet Knight Signee, Everett Wormley for an exclusive interview for all of our “On the Banks” fans to get to know Ev a little better. To see my scouting report on Wormley, simply click here.

What was it about Rutgers University, outside of Football related reasons, that helped you make your decision to attend school there?

Rutgers Business School is elite, and since I want to major in marketing it was a good match. Plus New York City being so close presented great internship opportunities.

Full Article



Crain's
New York, NY
Sunday, February 12, 2017

Crain's New York Business

Recent political events may have provided an opening for Uber's competitors to take a bite out of the ride-sharing service's dominance in New York. During demonstrations at JFK Airport two weeks ago over President Donald Trump's travel ban, Uber's response was regarded by some to be more in league with the White House than with the protesters, and a #DeleteUber campaign went viral. In the aftermath, more than 200,000 customers shut down their accounts, The New York Times reported. That led to a related bump in downloads for Lyft and two other apps, Via and Juno.

"This is a great opportunity for Lyft, particularly in this industry, where it's not really clear that Uber's services are much different from the others," said Michael Barnett, a professor of management at Rutgers Business School. "Lyft has gotten customers to try their app who probably wouldn't have bothered to switch if it wasn't for this."

Full Article



 

Brick, NJ
Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Asbury Park Press

Bob's Video Time will close on Saturday after 27 years, its owners said this week, admitting that they had no answers left for technology that was making their store obsolete.

Bob and Donna Karpodinis said they didn't want to close; they are too young to retire. But consumers can watch anything they want without leaving their home. The holiday shopping season fizzled. And they decided to pull the plug.

Artists still make movies. Consumers still watch them. But "in today's world, the technology has become one that has disenfranchised local merchants that delivered that content," said Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"Video stores no longer service a need that's significant," Rutgers' Kalan said. "I would commend whoever ran the Brick store that they outlasted virtually (everyone else)."

Full Article



ValueWalk

 

Newark, NJ
Tuesday, February 7, 2017

ValueWalk

An exceedingly helpful paper on the topic of this column (the merit of valuations-based market timing) was recently published by Valentin Dimitrov of Rutgers Business School and Prem C. Jain of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. It is titled: Shiller’s CAPE: Market Timing and Risk.

The paper states that: "We find that even when CAPE is in its ninth decile, future 10-year stock returns, on average, are higher than future returns on 10-year Treasurys. Thus, the results are largely consistent with market efficiency. Only when CAPE is very high, say, CAPE is in the upper half of the tenth decile (CAPE higher than 27.6), future 10-year stock returns, on average, are lower than those on 10-year U.S. Treasurys." So the paper is not generally supportive of the Valuation-Informed Indexing concept. However, it provides a wealth of data and analysis that I believe should be reviewed by all with an interest in coming to a better understanding of many questions raised by Robert Shiller's "revolutionary" (his word) 1981 research showing that valuations affect long-term stock returns.

Full Article



Teen Vogue
New York, NY
Friday, February 3, 2017

Teen Vogue

In the early 1900s, men formed the first parts of what would grow to be the National Football League, or NFL. The sport was presided over by men and played by men, and has long had a stereotypically male fan-base.

But fast-forward to current day, and the NFL's fan-base is nearly half female — around 45% (which likely comes as no surprise to, well, any of us who are fans.)

Of course, you can't talk about the NFL and women without acknowledging problems in the league.

Aside from these more serious issues, though, there's also the past stumbles with marketing to women —like the notorious "shrink it and pink it" logic of women's gear, which basically meant creating women's jerseys that looked like men's, only smaller and pink.

"What marketers have found is that when you have a product that women start to take to; as soon as marketers started to go for women, they lost women because women were like, 'hey I just want this product, it doesn't need to be girly,'" Kristina Durante, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School, tells Teen Vogue. "We don't have to have just one gender role that is hyper-feminized," she adds. "We can be whatever feels right for us."

"Women are more independent and have more buying power than ever before," says Durante. "We have more opportunities and are outpacing men when it comes to education." And then take into account that women make up about a third of fantasy sports players. A rising number play football. Many are segueing into coaching, announcing, and executive roles in the sport. And this weekend for the Super Bowl, upward of 50 million of us will be watching.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Rutgers University Newark

During the summer between my sophomore and junior year, I studied at the European Business School in Germany. While I was there, I was mesmerized by the beautiful countryside in Oestrich-Winkel, the town where the business school is located.

I didn't spend all my time in Germany though. I also traveled to France and the Netherlands. Some of the most beautiful cities and towns I visited were Frankfurt, Rüdesheim am Rhein, Strasbourg, Amsterdam and Berlin. The cultural differences between the U.S. and the European countries I visited were a delightful surprise to me.

The classes at the European Business School were challenging, but Rutgers Business School had prepared me to do well. The classes that helped me the most were many of the intro classes such as microeconomics, finance, and supply chain management. I also put my communication, time management and presentation skills to good use. I developed some of those skills through my involvement with the Marketing and Management Society - I proudly serve as the organization's vice president. Rutgers provided me with the necessary tools - and confidence - to venture abroad, to learn more about the international business environment and to gain an experience that has impacted my life and ambitions.

Carmelo Martinez is currently a junior, double majoring in accounting and management information systems at Rutgers Business School.

Full Article



Financial Buzz
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Financial Buzz

SEMPO, the world's largest nonprofit organization serving the search and digital marketing industry and the marketing professionals engaged in it, announced today that Mike Moran, long-time search marketing author and consultant, has joined SEMPO’s Board of Directors. He will be responsible for working with the SEMPO Board to drive strategies designed to increase industry awareness of website and on-site search.

"Mike's deep understanding of the search engine marketing industry, together with his digital marketing consulting background, further strengthens our outstanding Board," said Mike Gullaksen, president of SEMPO. "We are delighted to welcome Mike to the SEMPO Board."

"I am honored to join SEMPO's Board of Directors," Moran said.  He teaches digital marketing at Rutgers Business School Executive Education Online Mini-MBA™ program and is a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business.

Full Article



Rutgers Today
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Rutgers Today

Rutgers-New Brunswick students can ‘Halo home’ with the help of caring, entrepreneurial student

Starting this semester, Rutgers University-New Brunswick students who find themselves alone late at night can text a request for students to walk them home five nights a week.

Rutgers senior Daniel Reji envisioned the text-a-friend service as a sophomore researching sexual assault on college campuses nationwide. When his research revealed that buddy systems – traveling in groups of two or more – are often the best way to stay safe, he knew the next step was creating a start-up to help students who needed a late-night friend to find one.

Daniel Reji, a Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick senior, started SafeHalo with Jamie Farren, a School of Communication and Information senior, so students can text requests for safe walks home.

"The same way you get an Uber, I thought, what if you could request two students to walk you home – judgment free, stigma free, actually free?" says Reji, a marketing major with a concentration in entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.

Reji and Farren have assembled an outstanding team of "Halos," volunteers from a variety of majors, interests and backgrounds who have one thing in common: they want to help fellow students, says Alfred Blake, assistant director of undergraduate entrepreneurship programs in the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development in Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick. One of the challenges of scaling their model will be for other schools to do the same.

Full Article



Financial Times
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, January 29, 2017

Financial Times

Insead is top of the 2017 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking of the best 100 full-time MBA programmes. It is the second year that the multi-campus international business school has taken the number one spot, after claiming it for the first time last year.

U.S. schools are rebuilding their strength in this ranking, with their number increasing to 51. Six of the eight new or returning schools are from the U.S.

Among these six US schools, Rutgers Business School in New Jersey is the highest new entrant at 70 (and No. 37 in the U.S.).

Full Article and Rankings



Wharton, NJ
Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Customized Distribution Services (CDS)

Customized Distribution Services (CDS), a national provider of third-party logistics and warehousing services, is pleased to announce the inaugural recipient of its Supply Chain Management Education Scholarship, Ms. Colleen Graner. An undergraduate senior student at Rutgers Business School, Ms. Graner is pursuing multiple degrees in Supply Chain Management, Marketing, and Management and Global Business.

Ms. Graner possesses an impressive amount of hands-on industry experience through multiple internships. She also maintains a strong record of leadership skills through volunteer work and her position in the Rutgers Business School Ambassador Program.

CDS' scholarship initiative aims to help students realize their higher education goals regardless of financial capacity, and pursue a rewarding career in one or more avenues of the supply chain industry.

Full Article



The New Stack
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, January 24, 2017

The New Stack

Getting started with a new project, business or application idea is a challenge for anyone, but this challenge can increase exponentially if an entrepreneur is Black, Latinx or a woman. Many first-generation immigrant entrepreneurs miss out on the 'family and friends' seed funding round their Ivy League white male counterparts may get. Others are faced with the task of securing capital with a business potential that isn't in the billions.

Without minority entrepreneurs being able to access these resources, the technology ecosystem and the world as a whole will find itself lacking. "That means important, profitable businesses are not being launched and not growing to scale, and really that means that our world is losing out on innovations that we all want and we all want to promote and encourage," explained Professor Lyneir Richardson of Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED), speaking with TNS Associate Podcast Producer Kiran Oliver on the new episode of The New Stack Makers podcast.

CUEED aims to help minority tech entrepreneurs access resources such as capital, meeting spaces, business advice, and offers instruction on how to apply to a technology accelerator program or a government-funded grant for seed capital.

Full Article
Podcast



NorthJersey.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, January 23, 2017

NorthJersey.com

One hundred years ago, the Hahne & Co. department store on Broad Street was the pride of Newark, a retail palace ranked among the most elegant shopping emporiums in America.

Monday, after decades in which the store was empty and abandoned, the pride was back.

The Hahne & Co. building was rechristened as Newark's showplace with a ceremony marking the reopening of the site as a residential, retail and educational complex.

"It's a moment to remember the potential of Newark and Newarkers," said Nancy Cantor, chancellor of Rutgers University-Newark, which has moved its arts and cultural center into the building, as well as its campus bookstore, which will be operated by Barnes & Noble.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Monday, January 23, 2017

Asbury Park Press

President Donald Trump's moves on Monday to steer the nation on a more isolationist path could generate more jobs, but it also could lead to trade wars, cede world leadership to China, and spark higher consumer prices, experts said.

It prompted one New Jersey leader to worry that the debate about the merits of free trade distracts from a more pressing issue: training students and displaced workers for jobs that will pay a living wage and rebuild the middle class.

"It's really missing the point," said Farrokh Langdana, a finance and economics professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark. "We need to retrain the job force."

Full Article



Fountain Valley, CA
Sunday, January 22, 2017

Editor&Publisher

Newspaper media companies continue to have a brand crisis on their hands and seem to either be oblivious to the problem or lack the will to do something about it. The problem has many roots—most notably (and regrettably) the media's (including newspapers) totally one-sided coverage of their own industry. How many articles about newspaper layoffs, circulation declines, ownership changes and financial woes have you read? How many articles about the growth and local dominance of newspaper media companies in the digital environment? As an industry, newspapers fail to celebrate their successes and fixate on the negatives. And that is what gets public attention.

I've written elsewhere about the misperception of newspapers as the proverbial dinosaur of media. Doomed to extinction. Well, newspapers are indeed emulating the dinosaur in remarkable and innovative ways—because dinosaurs are not extinct. They've simply adapted. We are surrounded daily by dinosaurs, we just don't recognize them. Their modern-day descendants thrive today as perhaps the most prolific and adaptive (10,000+ species) land vertebrate on earth—birds!

Bob Provost
Distinguished Executive-In Residence

Rutgers Business School

Full Article



Washington D.C.
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The B-STAR program helps Rutgers Business School fulfill its commitment to excellence in diversity and inclusion. Our B-STAR students are a highly diverse group: all are minorities who are traditionally underrepresented in the business school, 60 percent are multilingual, and 42 percent are low-income. More than half of B-STAR students are first in their family to go to college. By living and learning in such a diverse group, students see the value of different perspectives for business excellence.

Read the entire blog:



Shanghai
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The Chinese are not thrilled about their entanglement with the U.S. economy, any more than Donald Trump is, but like a quarreling couple, the two nations have kept dancing together out of mutual self-interest, according to a U.S. expert. Farok Contractor, a distinguished professor at Rutgers Business School, made the remarks in an article posted on his website.

According to Professor Contractor’s research, adding up the numbers for exports as well as foreign direct investment (FDI) between China and the U.S., the maximum number of jobs created by such activities in China is between 17.79 and 17.99 million, while the number in the US is about 1.6 million. Besides jobs, other consequences of the two nations’ intertwined economy are also too important to be neglected.

Professor Contractor's blog was also republished by the Xinhua News Agency

Read the entire piece



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, January 17, 2017

NJBIZ

By Lyneir Richardson, executive director, The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Rutgers Business School.

Technology accelerators provide entrepreneurs with access to seed capital, business relationships, guidance and office space. Over the last 18 months, three accelerators have opened in Newark with great fanfare. The investors and corporations that have funded these accelerators have been praised for being committed to Newark's revitalization.

The individuals behind the accelerators have expressed their understanding of the importance of racial and gender diversity among the entrepreneurs with whom they'll be teaming. Tom Wisniewski, who is the managing director of venture capital fund Newark Venture Partners, said that his firm will "look to support a diverse set" of entrepreneurs, "including women and minorities."

While there's talk of diversity, the truth is that less than 5 percent of the teams that are admitted into Newark's accelerator programs are led by a Black or Latino owner. Many have approached the accelerators with tech venture ideas, but they've often been denied or deferred for a variety of reasons.

I've been contacted by well-educated and talented minority startup owners whose businesses offer valuable solutions for the ed tech, defense, and other large national markets. Unfortunately, their growth and revenue potential are severely constricted because of their inability to attain seed capital and early stage support from investors.

I believe that part of the reason why Black and Latino teams haven't been given a proper shot is due to unconscious bias in the accelerators' and investors' selection process. To remedy this challenge, here are four suggestions that would help accelerators in Newark (and beyond) to offers opportunities to Black and Latino entrepreneurs who are seeking to build promising technology companies:

1. Focus on inclusion in the selection/admission process
2. Add Black and Latino investors
3. Leverage minority-targeted events to foster outreach
4. Consider the local benefits that a $50M company can deliver

Full Article



Black Press USA
Newark, NJ
Monday, January 16, 2017

Black Press USA

Despite a plethora of economic and social challenges, African-Americans remain among the most optimistic consumer groups in the nation's economy.

A recent report by the market research firm, Packaged Facts, revealed that nearly half (47 percent) of African-Americans believe they will be better off financially 12 months from now.

"I work with African-American entrepreneurs each day who believe that they can create opportunity and generate profit. Words like hustle, ingenuity, faith, and luck almost always trump fear and pessimism," said Lyneir Richardson, the director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, a research and practitioner-oriented center at Rutgers Business School in Newark, New Jersey.

Full Article