"It is a [business] culture that is not for everyone," said John Longo in The New York Times

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Date: 
Friday, September 8, 2017
Location: 
New York, NY

The New York Times

Over four decades, Mr. Dalio, 68, has built Bridgewater, which has $160 billion in assets, into the largest hedge fund firm in the world — bigger than the next two largest hedge funds combined.

He has also built an unusual and confrontational workplace at Bridgewater, where employees hold each other to account by following a strict set of rules that he created, "Principles."

All of the rules celebrate what Mr. Dalio calls "radical transparency" in the workplace, and the search for the ideal employee.

In an industry known for producing flameouts, the consistent returns have drawn investors to Bridgewater despite Mr. Dalio's idiosyncratic leadership style, which has included frequent management shake-ups. Most recently, Mr. Dalio ousted Jon Rubinstein, a former top Apple executive, in March after hiring him just 10 months earlier as the firm's co-chief executive officer, because he was not a "culture fit."

"It is a culture that is not for everyone but not one that would dissuade me from investing," said John Longo, a finance professor at Rutgers University School of Business.

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TAGS: Finance and Economics John Longo Leadership