In the Media

Asbury, NJ
Monday, June 20, 2016

Asbury Park Press

The Jersey Paddler, a store in Brick that sold kayaks and canoes for the past 50 years, has closed.

The closing, noted quietly on a chalkboard next to its entrance, was a blow to consumers who said they had come to rely on the store not only for its high-end boats and boards, but also its role in fostering a deep love for the sport.

"I think this is a very good reflection of the movement from the typical brick-and-mortar economy to an e-economy," said Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

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BUSINESSWORLD
New Delhi, India
Monday, June 13, 2016

BUSINESSWORLD

The London Business School (LBS) recently felicitated Rana Kapoor, managing director and chief executive officer, Yes Bank for his "exemplary contribution to entrepreneurship and innovation" at the India Business Forum (IBF) 2016, the annual flagship conference of the London Business School India Club.

LBS is one of the most prestigious business schools and has been consistently ranked among the top business schools in the world.

June 1, the day he was felicitated, incidentally, marks 36 years in the banking industry for Kapoor.

An alumnus of the prestigious Shri Ram College of Commerce, Kapoor went on to do an MBA from Rutgers Business School, New Jersey, US.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, June 7, 2016

NJBIZ

Packed with industry giants and power players, the advisory board of the Rutgers Business School Center for Real Estate has no shortage of leadership or experience.

But the group wants to ensure its viability for decades to come, while connecting with the students it was meant to serve when it was formed last year.

It's why the center has assembled its new Emerging Leaders Council, a collection of rising stars in New Jersey's commercial real estate sector who are poised to accomplish both objectives.

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Dynamic CISO
New Delhi, India
Friday, June 3, 2016

Dynamic CISO

By employing the Internet of Things (IoT) in our homes, the lights turn on and the temperature adjusts automatically when we walk through the door, our refrigerators inform us when we need milk, and high-tech washers and dryers notify us via smartphone when our clothes are done.

But the IoT is transforming more than just how we live; it's also revolutionizing the global supply chain. Shippers are deploying active tracking devices on cargo containers to monitor shipments in real time.

Glen Gilmore, an attorney and author who is an instructor with Rutgers Business School-Executive Education, where he has created instruction in digital marketing, crisis communications and supply chain management, warns "regulatory and law enforcement authorities are issuing new warnings about the vulnerabilities of such technologies to hacking."

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Daily Record
Rockaway, NJ
Thursday, June 2, 2016

Daily Record

Bergen Botanicals, a company that specializes in indoor landscaping, is opening a retail location and will hold a grand opening celebration on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The company is owned by Brian Bergen, who is a West Point graduate, former Army officer and Apache Helicopter Pilot turned entrepreneur. In 2014, while attending Rutgers Business School, Bergen won first place in a business plan competition hosted by the university and got $20,000 in seed money to help bring his business idea to life.

Bergen used the money to start the company that provides corporate interior landscape services in New York and New Jersey, including holiday decorating, living walls and plant rentals.

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Piraeus, Greece
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Hellenic Shipping News

A U.S. expert lauded China's efforts to advance the supply-side structural reform and said it is right on target as the country's economy is now settling into a "new normal" of lower growth rates.

"China is producing a lot, but its people are not buying it. The mismatch of supply and demand is a pain for the economy. However, the supply-side reform is here to solve this problem," said Zhao Yao, professor and co-director of the Supply Chain Analytics Laboratory at Rutgers Business School.

Structural reform on the supply front requires industries to change focus from blind expansion to the actual demands of customers through offering innovative products, analysts say.

"Supply-side reform is mainly two things, one is to improve the Chinese companies' productivity and the other is to win the competition in a global market," said Zhao at a Chinese executive training program held at Rutgers Business School on Tuesday.

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Newark, NJ
Saturday, May 28, 2016

Godel's Lost Letter and P=NP

Shiteng Chen and Periklis Papakonstantinou have just written an interesting paper on modular computation. Its title, "Depth Reduction for Composites," means converting a depth-d, size-s ACC0 circuit into a depth-2 circuit that is not too much larger in terms of d as well as s.

One of the great mysteries in computation, among many others, is: what is the power of modular computation over composite numbers?

Chen and Papakonstantinou increase our understanding of modular gates by proving a general theorem about the power of low depth circuits with modular gates. This theorem is an exponential improvement over previous results when the depth is regarded as a parameter rather than constant.

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College Choice
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

NJBIZ

When it comes to choosing a college at which to earn a bachelor's degree in accounting, a would-be CPA could do worse than Rutgers Business School. A lot worse, in fact, according to the website College Choice.

College Choice, a higher education search and rankings site, said the Rutgers program not only cracked the Top 50 nationwide, but ranked in the Top 10 at No. 7 overall.

Rutgers was the only New Jersey college to make the list.

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WalletHub
Washinton, DC
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

WalletHub

"Deals on new cars tend to get better in October as the new models are delivered to the lots.  So, there may be an incentive to wait. But several factors suggest that it may be an opportune time to make a purchase.  First, we are approaching the end of the month.  Many dealers have quotas that need to be met.  They are likely to give a better deal to consumers as the month end approaches," said John Longo, Department of Finance & Economics, Rutgers Business School.

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NJBIZ
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, May 23, 2016

NJBIZ

SpeakEasy is a running feature in NJBIZ in which we recap a presentation given by key business leaders around the state at one of New Jersey's many conferences and events. This report is based on a panel between Rutgers University students in supply chain management and industry leaders at the Women in Supply Chain Symposium held at the Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick in April.

The advancement of women to leadership roles is not simply a matter of diversity — it is also a competitive advantage to business organizations across the board.

That was the driving issue behind the Women in Supply Chain Symposium at Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick last month for both students applying to, and businesses recruiting for leadership positions within the supply chain industry.

Here is what Rebecca King, firstyear MBA student; Sarika Menon, secondyear undergraduate; Joseph Slota, partner at Deloitte Consulting LLP; and Aisha Khan, global change and communications manager at Johnson & Johnson, had to say about women leadership in supply chain management:

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EContent
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, May 23, 2016

EContent

A study, commissioned by Retale that polled American adults, reveals that 60% click on mobile banner ads by accident due to a finger slip or small screen size; merely 16% intentionally click on mobile banner ads because they like the product, service, or company being promoted; 66% believe mobile banner ads have little to zero value; and 68% find accidental clicks to be annoying.

Should you fear the fat finger and cater instead to the coupon-clipping faithful and rewards-seeking repeat buyer? That seems like sound advice to Stacy Smollin Schwartz, instructor of professional practice in the marketing department at Rutgers Business School. "Mobile-enabled coupons and loyalty cards work beautifully because they offer the benefits of both ecommerce and brick-and-mortar shopping for today's omnichannel shoppers and give the consumer control over which bits of each to use and when," Schwartz says.

Given the small screen sizes and task orientation we are used to with our smartphones, traditional ad banners often don't pass the test for effective mobile marketing. "Banner ads seek to distract consumers from adjacent content - not add function, convenience, or seamlessness to their task at hand," says Schwartz. "They often serve to be clunky road blocks-the antithesis to the invisible blending of online and offline worlds that mobile is so good at. We may trip over them trying to click on something else, artificially boosting click-through rates."

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New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

Asbury Park Press

Decked out in robes of scarlet and black, caps perched smartly on their heads, the graduates found themselves on the cusp of adult life. And kicking it off in once-in-a-lifetime style was the keynote speaker for the Rutgers University-New Brunswick commencement of the Class of 2016.

Not only did Sunday's ceremony celebrate the university's 250th anniversary — it was also the first in Rutgers history to receive face-to-face words of wisdom from a sitting president.

With more than 50,000 watching and listening, Obama gave the keynote address under a flag at half-staff for Peace Officers Memorial Day, resonating with the young and their parents.

Making note of the importance of the 250th anniversary graduation ceremony, Obama recounted the start of Rutgers — a converted tavern known as Queen's College.

"From that first pub, Rutgers has evolved into one of the finest research institutions in America," he said. "Every day, tens of thousands come to this intellectual melting pot in what just might be America's most diverse student body. America converges here and the history of Rutgers mirrors the evolution of America — stronger, richer and a more dynamic and more inclusive nation."

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USA Today
New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

USA Today Colleges

From his first words, Obama had the crowd hooked. For more than 40 minutes, he spoke of the slow march of progress, the acceleration of the pace of change, of political games and upheaval, of intellect versus common sense, economic disparity and climate change.

Making note of the importance of the 250th anniversary graduation ceremony, Obama recounted the start of Rutgers — a converted tavern known as Queen's College.

"From that first pub, Rutgers has evolved into one of the finest research institutions in America," he said. "Every day, tens of thousands come to this intellectual melting pot in what just might be America’s most diverse student body. America converges here and the history of Rutgers mirrors the evolution of America — stronger, richer and a more dynamic and more inclusive nation."

Obama said the Class of 2016 is a generation that has "everything it takes to make brighter choices."

"Choices toward cooperation, innovation and hope," he said. "You are confident, smarter and better educated than my generation, though we had better penmanship and we are certainly better spellers. They did not have spell check in my day. You are more exposed to the world. … You have the tools to lead us. You'll figure it out and look at things with fresh eyes."

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NorthJersey.com
New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, May 15, 2016

NorthJersey.com

President Obama on Sunday exhorted graduates of Rutgers University to reject cynicism and become politically active, and he took critical aim at some Republican ideas that have gained currency this election season, such as building a wall along the Mexican border.

"The world is more connected than ever before, and it's becoming more connected every day. Building walls won't change that," Obama said to applause. "The biggest challenges we face cannot be solved in isolation."

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Newark, NJ
Monday, May 9, 2016

New Jersey 101.5

How do New Jersey economists feel about the idea to raise the minimum hourly wage to $15? We asked a few of them.

Scott Rothbort, professor of finance at Seton Hall University, says he doesn't believe the government should be fixing any prices, whether it be labor costs or rent control.

"I believe that the markets should take care of pricing. The law of supply and demand should."

But Mitchell Koza, a professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, says, "from a humanitarian point of view, from and equality point of view, it is something that is laudible."

According to Koza, "you cannot support people, you cannot support a family on the existing minimum wage." He says he thinks that it is an experiment that should be tried.

"Too many people in our state are suffering."

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Tampa Bay, FL
Monday, May 9, 2016

Florida Politics

The Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council unanimously voted Monday to have staff members discuss strategies with a representative of the Rutgers Business School and its Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.

“It’s exciting,” said former Pinellas County Commissioner Barbara Sheen Todd. Todd, who serves on the TBRPC, said she had asked that the center’s representative, Lyneir Richardson, come to speak to the group.

Todd said she decided to contact the Rutgers group because it offered something different in strategies and had been awarded a national grant to work in urban areas around the country. Unlike other agencies or companies who want money in return for recommendations, the Rutgers group has its own. And Richardson said Rutgers will help communities find grants and other funds to help accomplish their goals.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, May 2, 2016

Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine

To strengthen and improve the business careers of veterans, Rutgers Business School introduced a mini-MBA program, Business Management for Military and Veterans, in fall 2015.   Veterans who participate in this Executive Education program earn a non-credit certificate.  The hope is if they like the program and demonstrate the right aptitude and skills, they'll enroll in a full MBA program.

In its first year, it attracted 11 participants. Most of its Executive Education programs attract from 10 to 30 students, which ensure close interaction between students and faculty.

The mini-MBA program lasts one week, starting on Monday and ending Friday.  Keeping it at one week's duration enhances its appeal, explained Margaret O'Donnell, program director for Rutgers' Executive Education.  "We find the accelerated form works well; some are offered online (though the mini-MBA isn't)," she said.

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NorthJersey.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, May 2, 2016

NorthJersey.com

The power of the second degree LinkedIn connection depends upon the quality of the first degree connection.

The fact that you have any specific quantity of connections on LinkedIn is of little real meaning. There's also the quality issue; in other words, just how good are these connections?

For instance, we used the example of the person with 500 first-degree connections.

But if all 500 of your connections have 500 of their own, then you have 250,000 second-degree connections, and when you do a search of target employers, and a second-degree connection comes up with a real good quality first-degree connection in between, now you're tapping into the power of the second degree.

Not that the formula is perfect. Far from it, actually, as was pointed out in an email to me by Daniel Levin, professor in the Management and Global Business Department in Rutgers Business School, who said, "I like the overall point ... I did want to point out one assumption made (both in the text and in the equation) that may be mistaken: namely, that there is no overlap in second-degree connections. That is, if 500 people each know 500 people, it is actually not the case that the result is 250,000 people, because the original 500 will know a lot of the same people in common (including each other). This is because the world is "clumpy" in that people sort themselves into relatively closed networks of similar people..."

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Wired Magazine
New York, NY
Friday, April 29, 2016

Wired Magazine

Amazon's electronic assistant foiled my first attempt at ordering a Domino's pie through one of the company's many platform plays. I also could have tweeted or texted or even turned on the TV. But I chose Amazon Echo because my Echo and I have a good rapport. Or we did, until I tried having it deliver a pizza to my mouth.

Alexa vexed me. I'd done the requisite work, setting up a Pizza Profile on the Domino's desktop site, enabling the Domino's "skill" in my Alexa app, and working up a healthy appetite. And yet, not a slice to be seen. What seemed so easy—and Domino's does make it sound easy—was anything but.

I mention this only to raise an important caveat before explaining Domino's AnyWare, an ambitious campaign to let you order pizza on every platform as quickly as humanly and technologically possible. AnyWare is innovative and a lot of fun. There's a lot to like about it.

Except trying it for the first time. But then, whether you actually try it is almost beside the point.

That willingness to take risks and break stuff often makes Domino's the first, and sometimes only, retailer trying new tricks. Consumers respond to that. "They're known for convenience," says Stacy Smollin Schwartz, a digital marketing veteran who teaches at Rutgers Business School. "In terms of the program fitting with that brand image, and giving them some press and some attention that they're trying to extend the distribution and convenience factor to mobile channels, it does give the impression that they have this tech-forwardness."

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New York, NY
Friday, April 22, 2016

Bloomberg Business

Verizon Communications Inc. consultant Timothy Donovan was told that opening global trade barriers would lift everyone from the mail room to the executive suite, but there he was Wednesday, on strike for the seventh straight day, calling on his employer to protect workers' jobs, wages and benefits.

If trade agreements could help U.S. workers, Donovan said, he'd be all for them.

"This is a political issue that (we've) been chewing on for more than 200 years," said Farok Contractor, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School in Newark. "Every political cycle this issue comes up."

The U.S. is squarely in the middle of the global economy. It is a member of the World Trade Organization, which spells out trade rules among 154 countries. And it has its own free trade agreements with 20 countries that are meant to even out the playing field and allow exporters to sell their products cheaper, Contractor said.

Contractor said the benefits are palpable. Americans have access to lower-priced goods, giving consumers more spending power. A recent check of Target's web site, for example, found a Magnavox 46-inch-screen, high-definition television set on sale for $349.99.

Contractor said many corporations have taken the profit they've generated in the global economy, and, instead of giving workers raises or better benefits, have invested in technology to become even more efficient; rewarded shareholders by increasing dividends; and awarded executives bonuses.

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