Media Coverage

Baltimore, MD
Monday, January 26, 2015

On Wednesday, Baltimore's spending panel is set to clear the way for the company to give the Baltimore Police Department new uniforms for officers in one district.

The project is described in city documents as a "collaboration" between the police and Under Armour to "potentially improve the quality and durability of police uniforms and relieve some strain on the Police Department budget."

The spending panel, which is controlled by the mayor, is expected to endorse an ethics waiver on Wednesday for the Police Department to seek the uniforms as a gift from Under Armour. The city documents say Under Armour will receive no "special access or favored treatment from any City agency or official," as a result of the gift.

Ann K. Buchholtz, research director for Rutgers Business School's Institute for Ethical Leadership, said the city's spending panel should review the proposal carefully to vet any potential conflict of interests.

"The public should know about it; sunshine is the best disinfectant," Buchholtz said. "If they review it and there is no expectation of quid pro quo, I would be OK with it."

While Under Armour may be looking to use the donations as an edge in the market, Buchholtz said, it's not unusual for civic-minded companies to make charitable contributions to the cities where they are based.

"Cities need that kind of support," she said. "We don't want to cut that off, but we always want to take a good look at it."

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Newark, NJ
Sunday, January 25, 2015

Questionable earnings? Quick enrichment. Quite enough! These are some of the answers you might get if you quizzed most Americans on what QE means to them. That’s because the U.S. Federal Reserve’s latest “quantitative easing” -- or QE -- program, under which asset purchases ended last fall, never touched the lives of ordinary citizens the way it was meant to, according to critics of the policy.

“The benefits have flowed to the very constituencies that don’t need it -- the wealthiest Americans and banks,” says Andrew Huszar, a senior fellow at Rutgers Business School and one of the managers of the Federal Reserve’s first round of QE in 2009 and 2010.

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The Trentonian
New York, NJ
Thursday, January 22, 2015

According to research conducted by academics Ankur Pareek at Rutgers Business School and Roy Zuckerman at Tel-Aviv University, we often determine whether someone is trustworthy based on their looks.

Hiring a money manager based on looks may seem far-fetched, but apparently it’s a major factor in how humans measure trustworthiness, the researchers say.

Unfortunately, it just doesn't work.

"Our underlying hypothesis is that trust may play an important role in the hedge fund industry due to the absence of public disclosure requirements and lack of verifiable information," the authors Ankur Pareek and Roy Zuckerman say. "We address this question by introducing a new approach to measuring perceived trustworthiness of hedge fund managers. Our approach is based on personal characteristics."

The scientists say that while the methodology may seem outlandish, it is a valid approach.

"There are two reasons why personal characteristics, such as appearance, may play a role in perceived trustworthiness of hedge fund managers: First, social psychology and neuroscience literature provides ample evidence that facial appearance is an important determinant of perceived trustworthiness for individuals," the researchers say. "Secondly, anecdotal evidence suggests institutions and high net worth individuals use their face-to-face meetings with hedge fund managers as an important criterion for making their initial and subsequent investment decisions."

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BusinessBecause
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, January 19, 2015

Rutgers Business School was one of the first in the US to launch an undergraduate program in supply chain management. It now offers an MBA in Supply Chain Management, a specialization within the full-time MBA program.

The New Brunswick-based MBA, which costs $21,329 in tuition per semester, has three courses in its specialization – management strategies, procurement management and global sourcing, and a supply chain management industry project.

Eugene Spiegle, vice chair of the supply chain management department at Rutgers, says supply chains have become a focus for companies, with “senior level management” being employed. In 2013, 95% of Rutgers’ MBA students secured a job placement.

“They have also become a way of life to sustain competitiveness and manage the fast-paced changes caused by both global markets and changing consumer demands,” he adds.

Full Article



Asbury Park, NJ
Saturday, January 10, 2015

In the big picture, social media helps consumers weed out the companies that deliver good products and services from the companies that don't, making the economy more efficient, said Ashwani Monga, chairman of the marketing department at Rutgers Business School.

But it is taking time for businesses to adapt. In days past, if customers had bad experiences, they could gripe to their friends, families and co-workers, but, short of filing a time-consuming lawsuit, that's where the complaint fizzled.

Now? A business can have 10 positive reviews and one negative review. If not handled properly, the negative review can catch fire. Suddenly, the business is mentioned in a Twitter post that ends with #badcustomerservice.

"You can have all the likes you want, but at the end of the day, if a few people write bad things about you, they are going to have a disproportionate impact," Monga said. "Increasing positive vibes is great, but you get a bigger bang for your buck if you reduce the negative ones."

BloombergBusiness.com



Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Wednesday, January 7, 2015

In a first for India, MISB Bocconi, India’s premier international business school, has been selected by the prestigious Journal of Accounting, Auditing, and Finance (JAAF) for its “Special Issue” Conference on ‘Research Challenges in Accounting and Finance in a Globalized Economy: Fair value measurements, valuation models, and management practices.’

The JAAF Special Issue will be released at the conference to be held on 8-10 January 2015 at MISB Bocconi’s campus in Knowledge Park, Powai, Mumbai. The conference is co-organised by JAAF, SDA Bocconi, Milan, and ISB, Hyderabad, and sponsored by PWC Italy.

Among the distinguished academics participating are guest editors Kashi R. Balachandran, Stern School of Business, New York University; Antonio Marra, Università Bocconi and SDA Bocconi School of Management; and Sanjay Kallapur, Indian School of Business. Keynote speakers include: Bala Dharan, Harvard Law School; Joshua Ronen, Stern School of Business, New York University; Bikki Jaggi, Rutgers University and Giorgio Gotti, President-Elect International Accounting Section--AAA, UTEP; and Agnes Cheng, Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Money Magazine
Newark, NJ
Monday, January 5, 2015

Several years ago, two Yale business school professors gave the personal finance industry a jolt by devising a formula for determining how active so-called actively managed mutual funds really were.

Now one of the inventors of Active Share has identified another very important trait of successful mutual fund managers: patience.

In a recent paper, Martijn Cremers, now of University of Notre Dame, and Ankur Pareek of Rutgers Business School, analyzed a large sample of actively-managed all-equity U.S. retail mutual funds over a 19-year period (1995-2013) and found that only those with both high active share and patient investment strategies, where managers hold stocks longer instead of trading frequently, tended to outperform by an average of 2.3 percentage points a year, even after management costs were taken out.

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China Daily
Newark, NJ
Friday, January 2, 2015

For Professor Lei Lei, it's always been about teaching her graduate students what to do after they get out of school.

"Students are no longer content with just an MBA degree," Lei said. "They want a career, and it's not counted as a career if they are not happy with the job."

The professor in supply chain management and marketing sciences will become dean of Rutgers Business School on Jan 1.

The job comes as a time when business schools around the world are facing transformation pains. Lei will help Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, navigate the fast-changing business environment by making the school as helpful as possible to students' career and businesses.

The number of students taking the GMAT, a test required for entrance into most US business schools, has dropped from around 266,000 in the 2008-2009 school year, to some 233,000 in 2012-2013.

It could indicate student frustration. As much-cheaper online courses get increasingly popular, and employers pay more attention to practical skills rather than just degrees, many business schools have failed to meet the challenge, wrote Forbes contributor Steve Denning.

"You have to make sure that after five, 10, 20 years, you are still one of the strong players in the world of business schools," Lei said.

In marketing, it is impossible to be strong in all aspects, but to stand out from the competition, one unique strength is enough.

Rutgers Business School, as part of a publicly funded university, cannot compete in funding with Ivy League business schools such as the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Business School. Instead, Lei is ready to make all of the Rutgers school's 6,000-plus students shorten their preparation time and "hit the ground running" in careers the moment they graduate.

"There is a gap between what textbooks teach and what companies want," said Lei. "But for good schools, the gap is smaller."

Full Article



IBT Pulse
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

As the global auto industry’s No. 2 air bag maker, Takata supplies most major automakers. As a result, the company’s single flaw infected millions of vehicles across the industry. Takata’s troubles illustrate a new phenomenon as automakers gravitate toward single major suppliers who have the scale to offer parts at low prices. Takata has made air bag systems for more than 100 million vehicles since it began researching air bags in the late 1970s.

“In effect it doesn’t matter what brand of car you drive, a part can come from the same factory,” said Sengun Yeniyurt, associate professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School. “When I was reading about Takata this summer I thought to myself it's just a matter of time before we'll see more of these industry-wide recalls in the future.”

Full Article



Champaign, IL
Tuesday, December 23, 2014

A few weeks ago, Piper Kerman, the author of "Orange is the New Black," spoke in the Illini Union to University students about her experience in a woman’s prison.

Though the talk happened some time ago, her points are still relevant to college-age students.

Naturally, Kerman spoke largely about changes that need to be made in our criminal justice system.

But, after attending the talk, I started thinking about how her various points were applicable to students at the University, even if these students do not have any direct ties to the prison system.

Mainly, she made it clear that mistakes happen, sometimes mistakes that are big enough to lead a person to prison.

So, I gathered two ideas from that statement. First, students need to be careful about mistakes in such a pivotal moment in our lives. And secondly, because mistakes happen, we should attempt to fully understand the people who make them.

Students at the University are in a pivotal moment. We are trying to make ourselves employable and trying to get ready for complete independence.

We need to keep that responsibility in mind when making decisions from this point forward.

Deeply consider how it could reflect if you were caught plagiarizing, stealing, cheating, driving under the influence, etcetera.

It would reflect terribly. But, unfortunately, these are mistakes that can often be commonplace among college students.

According to a survey conducted at Rutgers Business School by Donald McCabe, published in 2005, 43 percent of undergraduates admitted to cheating on tests or written work. And over 2 million college students 18 to 24 years old drove under the influence according to a 2009 study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Full Article



Newark, N.J.
Monday, December 22, 2014

A team of three Rutgers Business School students won the recent Institute for Supply Management's annual indirect procurement case competition in Phoenix.
The undergraduate supply chain management students – Dwight Gonzales, Sheryll Moser and Alexandra Preziosi – were required to analyze a lengthy case involving GlaxoSmithKline's spending on contracted legal services and to recommend ways the company could better manage its spending on litigation.

"We knew we had a good chance of winning," Moser said. "We were very competitive, and we had some good ideas, but we also knew we had a lot of strong competition."

Paul Goldsworthy, a supply chain management instructor who advised the team, said the students came up with a system of scoring law firms that would help company executives determine if a legal case could be better handled by outside lawyers or inside counsel.

"They had a pretty unique way of doing it," Goldsworthy said.

Full Article



Marketplace
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 16, 2014

The Federal Reserve is expected to make some big announcements this week, coming on the heels of meetings in Washington where Janet Yellen and her colleagues will be discussing the health of the U.S. economy. One subject that will undoubtedly come up is plummeting oil prices. As of today, oil is hovering right around $60 a barrel. So how will oil’s new low, low price affect the Fed’s anticipated policy changes?

Let’s start with inflation. One of the Fed’s stated goals is to increase inflation in the U.S. from its current 1.7 percent, to a target rate of 2 percent, “and all that’s going on in the energy sector is somewhat disinflationary if not deflationary,” says Marilyn Cohen, president of Envision capital management. She thinks falling prices in the energy sector could make the Fed cautious about raising interest rates.

But Americans spending less on fuel means consumers have more money for goods and services, “and that,” says former Fed economist Morris Davis, “should create, or at least be correlated, with new job creation.”

Money not being spent on oil would do more good for the economy than the hit that U.S. oil companies will take, and Davis thinks the Fed sees these low oil prices as a new, longer term reality. “If that’s what the Federal Reserve is thinking then they would I guess, assume an extended boom on these low oil prices.”

A continuing boom would be a signal to the Fed that says go ahead, raise interest rates. The Fed will issue its statement on Wednesday.

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Bizwomen
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 15, 2014

When I first called Sharon Lydon to talk about Rutgers Business School's 51 percent female MBA class, she couldn't talk: A new consulting club on campus was having its inaugural meeting and she wanted to be there for it.

We connected later that afternoon, and after 30 minutes on the phone, she (very kindly) told me someone else was vying for her attention: a student, with a new baby in her arms, hanging out by Lydon's office.

"I know she wants to talk to me about working out finals she needs to take," she said.

For Lydon, the associate dean and executive director of the MBA program at Rutgers Business School, these intimate moments built on relationships with students are the norm.

Full Article



Bizwomen
New York, NY
Monday, December 15, 2014

Barbara Bates co-founded the boutique communications firm Eastwick in Silicon Valley when many of today's most prominent tech leaders were still in diapers.

And over the past 24 years, the company has become one of the top names in public relations on the West Coast, with a client roster that has included giants, such as Hewlett-Packard, Adobe, Dell and Siemens, as well as startups gunning for an IPO and family-run small businesses.

But the last four years — with Bates as the only founding partner still working with Eastwick — have been all about growth. The company saw nearly 40 percent growth in revenue from 2012 to 2013 with offices in Sunnyvale, Calif., and San Francisco, and is on track to grow another 20 percent from 2013 to 2014, Bates said.

Now her latest venture is opening a third office — in New York City.

The move seemed like a natural progression for the company, considering that Eastwick's East Coast clientele have long hoped the firm would open a new operation in their time zone — and there are hundreds of potential clients in the most populous city in the nation.

But it's also a difficult move: The ecosystems of California's Silicon Valley and New York's "Silicon Alley" are drastically different — not to mention 3,000 miles apart.

"It can be very difficult for an outside firm to break into the (new) network and leverage the resources that are there," said Brett Anita Gilbert, an associate professor of entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School, who's done extensive research on the idea of geographic clusters for business.

Essentially, Gilbert said, "they have to become an insider."

Full Article



New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

In “The Economic Value of a Law Degree,” from The Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 43, No. 2 (June 2014), Michael Simkovic and Frank McIntyre find that law school graduates typically earn $39,000 to 57,000 more per year than similar college graduates. Responding to recent criticism about the return on investment of law degrees, the researchers show that, even for low earners, a law degree more than pays for itself over the course of a lifetime.

Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Education, Simkovic and McIntyre compare lifetime earnings of bachelor’s degree holders to lifetime earnings of law degree holders, including the 40% of law degree holders who do not practice law. Controlling for other factors that relate to earnings like college major, standardized test scores, GPA, family background, and self-reported motivation, the researchers find that law degree holders earn an average of 84% more per month than similar bachelor’s degree holders.

Full Article



Amsterdam
Thursday, December 11, 2014

Professor Nancy DiTomaso (Rutgers Business School) will discuss her 2013 book entitled 'The American Non-dilemma: Racial Inequality without Racism' (New York: Russell Sage Foundation). She will focus on her argument that racial inequality gets reproduced in the post-civil rights period as much by the advantages that whites provide to each other as by discrimination and racism of whites toward nonwhites.

DiTomaso argues that the segregation of neighborhoods, schools, and even churches contributes to whites using social networks among themselves to find jobs that are protected from market competition and that the “bias for” other whites contributes to different cognitive, political, and legal outcomes than having to enact “bias against” blacks and other nonwhites.
Full Article



Bizwomen
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

It's been a landmark year for gender parity and diversity at Rutgers Business School.

In January, Dr. Lei Lei will take over as dean of Rutgers Business School in New Jersey and will be the first female to hold the role in a full-time, permanent capacity. And this fall, the school welcomed an incoming full-time MBA class of 80 students that was 51 percent female.

Though the school has long teetered near the 50 percent mark, said Sharon Lydon, executive director of the MBA program, "this is the first time we broke that barrier."

Full Article



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

Sharon Lydon, executive director of the Rutgers Business School, parses no words about the underrepresentation of women in business.

“I would say it’s very strong and evident if you look at the amount of CEOs that hold seats. There are very few women compared to men,” she said.

That’s why she’s so excited about the school’s important milestone regarding gender parity: Next year’s students will be 51 percent female, Lydon said.

This makes Rutgers Business School the first in the nation to have a program in which more than half of its students are female.

Full Article



Men’s Health
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Long relegated to the bowels of toilet bowls and septic tanks, poop has gone mainstream, with a slew of websites offering poop on demand. It's not as gross as it sounds—on second thought, it really is—with poop delivery services giving customers a chance to buy the ultimate spite gifts for those who've wronged them.

“This isn't a gag, it's an attack,” claims Ann K. Buchholtz, Ph.D., Professor of Leadership and Ethics at Rutgers Business School. “It's an effort to 'get back' at someone who won't necessarily know who sent it. The reactions of the recipients could be anything from anger to annoyance to fear. Purposefully unsettling another person is not a joke. In fact, studies have shown that people who lash out at others actually do themselves harm physically and psychologically in the process. It prolongs the anger instead of releasing it and it can cause hypertension and depression.”

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 9, 2014

It's been a landmark year for gender parity and diversity at Rutgers Business School.

In January, Dr. Lei Lei will take over as dean of Rutgers Business School in New Jersey and will be the first female to hold the role in a full-time, permanent capacity. And this fall, the school welcomed an incoming full-time MBA class of 80 students that was 51 percent female.

Though the school has long teetered near the 50 percent mark, said Sharon Lydon, executive director of the MBA program, "this is the first time we broke that barrier."

Full Article



Pharmacy Choice
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers MBA students Mittal Shah and Sonal Patel were sitting next to one another in Rutgers Business School's Bove Auditorium as the winners of the annual biopharmaceutical case competition were announced on the afternoon of Nov. 14.

Within a few minutes, they knew that Kellogg had won third place. And then, Wharton was announced as the second-place winner.

The women looked at one another, nervously wondering where the team from Rutgers Business School would place. "It's going to be all or nothing," Patel said softly, waiting for the next winner to be announced.

When Rutgers was declared the first place winner, Shah and Patel leaped out of their chairs and hugged one another. The room erupted with applause for the home team, which also included Michael Kwatkoski, Paul Rosiak and Kinushuk Saxena, the team's sole first-year MBA student. All five students are pursuing MBAs in Rutgers Business School's top-ranked Pharmaceutical Management program.

The third annual biopharmaceutical case competition at Rutgers attracted teams from the nation's leading business schools, including Wharton, Columbia and Kellogg. Teams also represented Michigan State University, MIT Sloan, Duke, Penn State's Smeal College of Business and the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business.

After just a few years, Rutgers Business School's case competition has become known as an important one for MBA students hoping to move into careers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical fields. The competition has multiple company sponsors, intensifying the networking aspect of the day and the potential for students to impress major companies.

Full Article



Noodls
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers University-Newark has a decades-old tradition of using its academic resources in service to the people of the state, especially in its hometown. This sharing of public scholarship often takes the form of collaborations of RU-N faculty and students with city government or the business community.  However, two current projects -- involving Rutgers Business School (RBS) Professor Kevin Lyons and his students - are aimed at benefitting both the public and the private sectors, as well as Newark's citizens.

Lyons and his Supply Chain Environmental Management classes, both undergraduate and graduate, are working with the City of Newark's various procurement divisions to streamline their purchasing processes and make awarding of contracts more efficient and less time-consuming.  "We're examining purchasing policies at the state and local level, and the layers of bureaucracy, that can stretch out awarding of a contract to take six months," he says. "Outsiders bring a fresh eye and can see things more objectively," he explains.

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NJ.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

New Jersey is making an economic recovery. Just ask your neighborhood dry cleaner.

That’s what a team at Rutgers Business School did, using a novel economic index: the Dry Cleaning Index, or DCI.

Farrokh Langdana, a professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School, came up with the index of starched shirts, suits and blouses based on a statistic behind unemployment numbers: the people over age 16 who are unemployed but who are not seeking work.

Unemployment numbers are based solely on the number of people seeking work. This means that official unemployment figures can be misleading if big numbers of people are discouraged from continuing to try to find work.

"The index provides information that was not previously available, and it captures, to some extent, the mobility of workers back into the work force to look for work," said Langdana.

“It’s a little outside the box, but from an economic indicator point of view, it provides an interesting perspective in New Jersey,” said Dan Stoll, a Rutgers Business School spokesman.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers Business School, Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development has the mission to support the revitalization of Newark, New Jersey. Through its academic resources and partnering outreach the Center seeks to build a strong entrepreneurial and small business community in Newark.

On November 18, 2014 the Center presented a special program that included a panel discussion entitled, “Local Wealth, Global Millions” followed by its 1st Annual Entrepreneurship Awards Ceremony honoring entrepreneurs with ties to Rutgers University.  The award ceremony was led by CUEED Executive Director Lyneir Richardson who oversees the implementation of CUEED research and practitioner oriented programs that includes fundraising. Also, participating were Jasmine Cordero, Managing Director of CUEED, and Alfred Blake, Director of Undergraduate Entrepreneurship at Rutgers University.

PNC Bank which has ties to the local community was the inaugurating sponsor for the Awards Ceremony.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Sunday, December 7, 2014

Though the marketing mix traditionally includes four Ps, today's successful strategies must include consideration of people - readers, staff, and advertisers - as well.

I am teaching an introduction to marketing honours class at Rutgers Business School.

On the first day of class I addressed my students as follows:

"You will be tested on the course material in this class not because it represents immutable truths that will last you a lifetime; rather you will be tested to demonstrate your ability to learn and to apply what you learn. The most significant aspect of a college degree is not that you graduate knowing everything you need to know, but that you are ready for the continual learning curve that will be your career.

"Employment is just another form of graduate school, albeit a preferable one. In college, you pay tuition for the privilege of learning. When you are employed, someone will pay you to learn, apply what you learn, and then continue to learn and grow.

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circuitnet.com
New York, NY
Friday, December 5, 2014

ACM (the Association for Computing Machinery) www.acm.org has designated 49 scientists, engineers and educators as Distinguished Members for their individual contributions, and their singular impacts on the vital field of computing. Their achievements have had a significant influence on the social, economic and cultural areas of daily lives all over the world. The 2014 Distinguished Members are from universities in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Sweden, Japan, India, the United Kingdom and North America, and from leading international corporations and research institutions.

ACM President Alexander Wolf hailed these ACM members as "drivers of the advances and inventions that are propelling the information revolution in new directions. Their creativity and commitment to their craft ensures that we will benefit as a society in the digital age.” He added that these innovators “demonstrate the advantages of ACM membership, which empowers and inspires a bold vision for advancing computing and the computing community."

Professor Hui Xiong, Department of Management Science & Information Systems, Rutgers Business School was recognized as a 2014 Distinguished Scientist.

Full Article



Brisbane Times
Friday, December 5, 2014

There’s a curious trend happening in workplaces: they’re becoming depersonalized. It began with hot-desking, then it ramped up with work-from-home options, and now it’s really taken off with virtual teams where people aren’t in the office at all. Is it OK, though, to spend years working for an organization without ever meeting your colleagues?

Some would say yes, definitely. The idea of never seeing your boss or, conversely, avoiding eye contact with your employees, might truly be a godsend. Others, however, lament the loss of human connection and deplore the onset of a new type of workplace isolation.

That isolation is defined by the fundamental way in which work has changed. Once upon a time, work was a destination to which people commuted. But now, for many employees, work is simply a task or a role they complete. Where they do it is mostly irrelevant.

Either way, the challenge for managers and business owners will be to lead a team with sufficient amounts of cohesion and collaboration in the absence of real-world physical contact.

Earlier this year, Terri Kurtzberg from Rutgers Business School released her new book, Virtual Teams, in which she linked the rise of remote work to job dissatisfaction.

Her argument is that, in the past, employees could tolerate a crappy job if they worked with awesome colleagues. Any displeasure they felt about their work was compensated by the respect and friendship they derived from workplace relationships.

Virtual workers don’t have that luxury. If they’re doing a job they dislike, they’re stuck in the misery of it because they can’t turn to a workmate and vent. That’s why Associate Professor Kurtzberg recommends leaders should “take a hands-on role in making sure that connections remain vibrant.” Employees, too, should be “supporting each other to promote the wellbeing of the group.”

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WBGO
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 1, 2014

Cyber Monday got its start at a time when many people could only get a high-speed Internet connection at work to shop online deals. But that’s not the case anymore, and it’s impacting how we shop for the holidays.

Shoppers both in stores and online got an early jump on this year’s holiday discounts, which could lead to less of an incentive to shop on the internet this Cyber Monday.

But Rutgers Business School Professor Marc Kalan says that’s because online shopping is now more spread out over the holiday season.

“Instead of calling it Cyber Monday, pretty soon we’re going to just start calling it Cyber 24/7, the place where you can go at any point in time, and of course that’s going to therefore put a little more pressure on the bricks and mortar guys to stay open even longer hours, or offer more opportunities, more unique sales.”

Kalan says every day is Cyber Monday for online shoppers—and that means they’re not as concerned about getting the best deal on any one day leading up to the major holidays.

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Rutgers Today
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Rutgers Business School students are helping New Jersey businesses while gaining valuable on-the-job experience. The Student Experiential Learning Program pairs students with small companies where they act as consultants, managing real projects to help their clients thrive.

Watch their work in action. (YouTube)



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Rutgers University MBA students Mittal Shah and Sonal Patel were sitting next to one another in Rutgers Business School’s Bove Auditorium as the winners of the annual biopharmaceutical case competition were announced.

Within a few minutes, they knew that Kellogg had won third place. And then, Wharton was announced as the second-place winner.

The women looked at one another, nervously wondering where the team from Rutgers Business School would place. “It’s going to be all or nothing,” Patel said softly, waiting for the next winner to be announced.

When Rutgers was declared the first place winner, Shah and Patel leaped out of their chairs and hugged one another. The room erupted with applause for the home team, which also included Michael Kwatkoski, Paul Rosiak and Kinushuk Saxena, the team’s sole first-year MBA student. All five students are pursuing MBAs in Rutgers Business School’s top-ranked Pharmaceutical Management program.

The third annual biopharmaceutical case competition at Rutgers attracted teams from the nation’s leading business schools, including Wharton, Columbia and Kellogg. Teams also represented Michigan State University, MIT Sloan, Duke, Penn State’s Smeal College of Business and the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business.

After just a few years, Rutgers Business School’s case competition has become known as an important one for MBA students hoping to move into careers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical fields. The competition has multiple company sponsors, intensifying the networking aspect of the day and the potential for students to impress major companies.

Professor Mahmud Hassan, director of the Lerner Center for Pharmaceutical Management, said Rutgers is trying to model its case competition after the well-respected one hosted by Kellogg School of Business.

Hassan said next year he hopes to increase the number of teams that participate and to attract international schools to the event. Rutgers has the potential to do that because of the consortium of company sponsors, he said.

“Having more companies makes it more attractive to the teams,” he said. “The students get to network with more companies, and the companies get to see the talent of the students.” This year, the sponsoring companies were Bayer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Campbell Alliance, Eisai, Herspiegel Consulting, Novartis and Novo Nordisk.

“For both sides, it’s a win,” Hassan said.

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