In the Media

The Korea Times
Seoul
Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Researchers from Rutgers Business School and Carlson School of Management surveyed 629 people to see how economic conditions affect gender preferences for their offspring. Participants read articles telling them the economy was either improving, getting worse or remaining neutral. They were then asked to divide their assets between an imaginary son and daughter. Those who read an article describing the economy as bad allocated about 60 percent of their assets to a daughter. But when economic conditions were expected to be neutral or improve, participants split their property nearly 50-50. "Almost all parents say that they don't favor one of their children over another, but economic recessions subconsciously lead parents to prefer girls over boys," said lead researcher Kristina Durante, who will begin teaching at Rutgers Business School in September.

To read the entire article:

Other publications writing about Professor Durante's research:

DailyMail.com: "Bad news for boys: Researchers say parents prefer daughters if times get tough"

Zeenews.com: "Daughters favored over sons in hard times"

NewKerala.com: "In times of tough economy, parents pick daughters over sons"



BusinessBecause
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, June 28, 2015

BusinessBecause

The global aerospace industry is set for take-off. A boom in aviation, the introduction of increasingly fuel efficient aircraft, and a falling oil price have combined to set the scene for years of growth for the aviation business.

The world’s biggest aircraft manufacturers have record orders. The International Air Transport Association projects airlines to generate the strongest profit margins since the mid-1960s.

And, meanwhile, the Space Foundation says the world’s space economy is growing at 10% a year.

But such rapid demand has raised concerns that manufactures’ long, complex supply chains may not be up to the job.

New technologies have aided both the supply chain and the wider aerospace business.

“It [technology] certainly expedites process and makes knowledge of current demands more readily available,” says Eugene Spiegle, vice chair of the supply chain management department at Rutgers Business School. “But at the same time, [technology] increases some degrees of security risk.”

Full Article



USA Today
McLean, VA
Friday, June 26, 2015

USA Today

While hundreds of eager, young professionals descended upon Wall Street earlier this month to begin their prestigious summer internships, fewer and fewer graduates may jockey for these positions in the future.

Increasingly, fewer millennials are pursuing careers in banking and finance. While there are no precise statistics on the trend, the New York Times reported that at elite universities like Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for example, “only 10% of undergraduates went into finance in 2014 — compared with the 31% who took jobs on Wall Street in 2006 prior to the financial crisis.”

However, Dr. Michael A. Santoro, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick, N.J., says that the growing trend of fewer graduates pursuing careers in the finance sector may be more specific to elite university students rather than graduates as a whole.

“The economy has evolved rapidly in recent decades and so have too, as a consequence, the job preferences of college graduates interested in business,” Santoro says. “The financial industry itself is now a much bigger part of the economy than it used to be. So, for many college graduates, this is where the jobs are. Most students are looking for secure, good paying jobs.”

Full Article



Rockville, MD
Wednesday, June 24, 2015

"In countries such as China with strong class divisions, internationally recognized brands can be a way of conveying wealth, prestige, and status," write authors M. Berk Talay (University of Massachusetts), Janell D. Townsend (Oakland University) and Sengun Yeniyurt (Rutgers Business School) in new research published by the Journal of International Marketing. According to the authors, "the appeal of global brands is often bound up with local cultural values."

Full article:



Brookings
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Brookings

Last month, manufacturers gathered at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) in Newark for a roundtable with government officials, educators, and industry leaders. The event spotlighted Essex County manufacturing partnerships and incentive programs and featured testimonials by companies such as Unionwear, which produces hats and bags in Newark’s North Ward. Otis Rolley, chief executive officer of the Newark Community Economic Development Corporation, told attendees about the resources available to manufacturers seeking to grow within Newark’s borders.

Meanwhile, at Newark Liberty International Airport on the other side of the city, students and faculty from Rutgers Business School were running a kiosk that sells merchandise made by New Jersey artisans and small manufacturers. The kiosk project, called Jersey Bound, complements the work of the Newark Industrial Solutions Center, which is housed at the business school’s Center for Supply Chain Management.

Full Article



Cannes Lions
Cannes Lions, France
Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Cannes Lions

The Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity has today held a press conference in Beijing to announce that it will honour SY Lau, Senior Executive Vice President of Tencent, President of its Online Media Group, with Media Person of the Year at the 2015 Festival.

SY Lau’s foresight has driven Tencent’s Online Media Group (OMG) to evolve from a single Internet portal into a highly integrated media matrix that has taken a preeminent position in China. “What SY has achieved is truly inspiring – contributing to the journey that builds Tencent into the largest integrated Internet service company in Asia is no mean feat,” says Terry Savage, Chairman of Lions Festivals. “The Media Person of the Year Award exists to recognise those who have shaped the future of the creative communications industry and who stand as an influential figure in today’s media landscape. SY is the epitome of this and it’s humbling to be able to award him with this accolade.”

 “It is truly an honour to accept this prestigious award on behalf of Tencent Online Media Group,” said SY Lau, Rutgers Business School Executive MBA alumnus, Class of '04. “Tencent prides itself in its commitment to deliver innovation and content that continually drives the user experience to new levels of excellence. This accolade is recognition for the immense effort of our teams who set themselves the goal of meeting the dynamic lifestyle demands of people all over the world.”

Full Article



Financial Times
New York, NY
Thursday, June 18, 2015

Financial Times

Is there any way to tell in advance which investment funds will perform best? And do the funds that most differ from their index — which are the most “active” — do better in the long run?

These questions strike at the very reason for the existence of the active management industry, which has suffered years of erosion as investors have moved to lower cost passive index funds. But active funds were offered a lifeline in 2009 when research by the academics Antti Petajisto and Martijn Cremers showed that a high “active share” led to higher outperformance.

New research by Cremers, of Notre-Dame University, with Ankur Pareek, of Rutgers Business School, suggests at least one other factor must also be taken into account — a fund’s holding period, or the average length of time it holds each stock. Highly active funds with long holding periods, which do not trade much, tend to outperform.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Friday, June 12, 2015

Through the Park

Through the Park blog provides an inside look into life as a student in the Rutgers Full-Time MBA program.

Explore this blog to gain insights about student life, academics and career management at Rutgers Business School. This blog is maintained by the Rutgers Association of Marketing and Strategy (RAMS).

Summer Internship Series: Anusha, Brandon and Amy

Each week this summer we will check in with a couple RBS students to learn more about their summer internships. For the inaugural post, we will hear from RAMS Co-Presidents Anusha Aneel and Brandon Harris, and RAMS Tech Chair Amy Lum.

For more information about the MBA Program please visit Rutgers Business School. You can also follow RBS on Facebook and Twitter.

Through the Park



WCPO.com
Cincinnati, Ohio
Thursday, June 11, 2015

The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber's MBA is one of eight organizations being highlighted as part of an Urban Innovation Report released June 10 by the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development in New Jersey. Cincinnati's MBA stood out because it was one of the rare initiatives that works with established minority-owned businesses in an effort to create jobs, said Rutgers Business School professor Jeffrey Robinson, the center's academic director. "The research tells us that that's where you get your biggest bang for the buck. These are the companies that can hire people in large numbers. These are the companies that can pay a living wage."

To see the full story



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Military Technolgies
More Millennials are taking the plunge to become home owners and house purchases by younger buyers are expected to grow. According to the National Association of Realtors, Millennials made up 32 percent of the U.S. housing market in 2014, up from 28 percent two years earlier, and have pulled ahead of the older Generation X as the largest segment of buyers.

Home ownership has not come easy to the Millennial generation, those born from the early 1980s up to the early 2000s, and many have delayed milestones such as buying a first home. "Millennials have faced quite a few challenges," said Morris A. Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Finance and Economics and Paul V. Profeta Chair of Real Estate at Rutgers Business School. "They have entered a bad job market with relatively high student debt and mortgage credit that is much harder to obtain than it was 10 years ago. The rate of household formation has been low in this recovery, and some of that reflects the behavior of Millennials and their reaction to our current environment."

Full Article



Westford, NJ
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Wicked Local Harvard

For parents with active young children who like to go to parks and playgrounds, encountering an improperly sized swing set could be dangerous.

Thankfully, Westford resident Stephanie Slattery has come up with a solution for children who lack the balance needed to not fall from a swing.

Slattery invented the Swingsafe after her son Eric, now 3, couldn’t stop himself from falling off the swings at the Edward’s Beach playground in Westford.

But Slattery couldn’t bring her product to market without a supplier.

“Finally, I found a private investor who just so happened to get my email,” Slattery said, “I really was about ready to give up because it had been about a year with nobody calling me back.”

Her new business partner, Braun Kiess, was first introduced to Slattery’s idea in October 2013, when Slattery sent an email introducing herself and her idea to a swing set company owned by Kiess in New Jersey called Rainbow Direct.

Kiess is the chief financial officer at Robotics Systems & Technologies and also an adjunct professor of finance and entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School, so his experience has proven invaluable to Slattery.

“My partner, Dr. Ben Sopranzetti, and I have helped more than 20 companies bring their products to market,” Kiess said, “We enjoy this work so much that we started a firm about five years ago called Partners2Market LLC that assists entrepreneurs in bringing their invention to market.”

Kiess and Sopranzetti provide angel funding, valuation, advisory and managerial services to entrepreneurs in a diverse range of industries.

“I am honored to be a part of this enterprise that is focused on helping children play more safely, and I am delighted to be working with such genuine people that have integrity and are doing this for all the right reasons,” said Ben Sopranzetti in an email, who also teaches at Rutgers Business School as an associate professor of finance.

Full Article



Framingham, MA
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

"On one level, CMU got caught unaware by Uber, yet there is some hope for an ongoing relationship," said Michael Santoro, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School.

Read the full story



NorthJersey.com
Woodland Park, NJ
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

In May, mere days after receiving her third master’s degree, Rosa Oppenheim, 65, hopped on a plane bound for Singapore, where she’s spent the last few weeks teaching an international business class. "I do try to make the most of my time," said Oppenheim, who chairs Rutgers’ Department of Supply Chain Management and Marketing Sciences. “An old friend remarked a long time ago that my epitaph should be, ‘She never wasted a minute.'"

Read the entire story



The Guardian
New York, N.Y.
Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Friendships can materially benefit organisations so cultivate them by all means. But don’t spread yourself too thin. Be mindful of the ties you form. You can have a lot of connections, but only a handful of them will be particularly valuable. Preliminary findings from my own research with Payal Sharma of Rutgers Business School show that women typically create friendship ties with other women and work-related ties primarily with men. Men’s friendships tend to be both task-based and emotional, creating a stronger bond.

To read the full story



Poets & Quants
New York, NY
Saturday, June 6, 2015

Poets&Quants

The annual supply chain management department’s Meet & Greet event at Rutgers Business School was launched five years ago as a way to connect undergraduate supply chain management majors with potential employers in the field. The first one was a modest affair, attracting 112 students and 20 companies.

As interest in the major has skyrocketed the last few years, the gathering has become one of the hottest events on campus, with campus police needed to monitor crowds. More than 650 students attended the one held at the school’s campus center last fall, eager to hobnob with the 87 companies who descended on the New Livingston, N.J., campus.

It has become so popular – more than 100 employers plan to attend this year’s event — that plans are underway to hold the next one at the mammoth New Jersey Convention and Exposition Center, said Eugene Spiegle, instructor and undergraduate program director of the department of supply chain management and marketing sciences. “There’s nothing on campus that is big enough anymore for us.” Spiegle said.

Rutgers has been on the forefront of this trend, and now has one of the leading undergraduate and graduate supply chain management programs in the country. The school first delved into the field back in 2000 with a supply chain major certificate program for MBA students, and a year later made it into an MBA concentration, said Lei Lei, the dynamic dean of Rutgers Business School—Newark and New Brunswick and the founding director of the Rutgers Center for Supply Chain Management.

The program quickly became one of the largest MBA concentrations, and was such a success that the school decided to introduce an undergraduate supply chain program in 2009 and an undergraduate major in 2010, Lei said.

Full Article



PRWeb
Newark, NJ
Friday, June 5, 2015

PRWeb

For newly minted faculty, the first two years in a tenure track position are critical to the successful launch of an academic career.

Through a partnership with the PhD Project and the Sheth Foundation, The American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) is making this transition easier by offering research grants to new, underrepresented faculty in business schools. The Valuing Diversity New Faculty Research Grant, supported by funds from the Sheth Foundation and AMAF, provides research support to underrepresented faculty in business schools, assisting them with this challenging period in their career.

Jerome D. Williams, Rutgers Business School Distinguished Professor and Chair of the AMAF Diversity Subcommittee, says he is “extremely delighted to recognize these four new faculty members who submitted outstanding proposals which are indicative of research that should make significant contributions to the field of marketing. Both AMAF and the Sheth Foundation are extremely proud to identify these four scholars as the initial recipients of the Valuing Diversity New Faculty Research grants.”

All award recipients will be given access to their grant funds in the beginning of Summer 2015 and will be recognized at the upcoming 2015 AMA Summer Educators' Conference in Chicago, IL.

Full Article



New York, N.Y.
Thursday, June 4, 2015

Some former employees claim that CVS stores in New York City are racially profiling black and Latino customers as potential shoplifters. This is the kind of case that Jerome Williams of Rutgers Business School knows well.  Williams says this lawsuit against CVS is unusual because former employees, not customers, are suing the retailer. "If you were a customer, many times, it's a case of he said, she said - your word against the word of the sales personnel or the security guard. But when you have the actually employee, that adds more weight and credibility in my opinion."

Listen to the story



BusinessBecause
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, June 3, 2015

BusinessBecause

As firms warm to the green economy they are able to attract and retain employees more easily, and hire younger executives who increasingly seek social impact.

Kevin Lyons, professor at Rutgers Business School’s Center for Supply Chain Management, says: “Sustainability is now becoming part of an effective business strategy that can reduce risk, improve and enhance innovation, resilience as well as the financial bottom line.”

Full Article



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Monday, June 1, 2015

NJBIZ

The Rutgers Business School's Center for Real Estate has unveiled the founding members of its advisory board, a star-studded roster than includes more 60 of the most influential developers and industry professionals in New Jersey.

In a news release, the program said its board is meant to be a cross-section of New Jersey’s real estate sector, featuring everyone from builders and brokers to government officials and bankers. And it will help provide students with speakers, mentors and access to real-world experiences as Rutgers continues to mold the academic and research program.

“We have assembled the industry’s top minds to help us revitalize and transform the way real estate curriculum is taught both in and out of the classroom,” Morris A. Davis, the Paul V. Profeta Chair and academic director of the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School, said in a prepared statement. “We appreciate the commitments that each member has made to our program and will be relying on our Advisory Board to bring practical and real world knowledge and experiences from every sector of our industry into our Center.”

Full article and membership



Forbes
New York, NY
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Forbes

Somehow “passive” has become the investing theme of the moment. Tons of money is flowing into index funds and ETFs. I am also hearing about “the death of active management.” I’ve heard about the death of a lot of things in my time–radio, television, pen and paper–and they’re all still here. Meanwhile, plenty of experienced, highly active managers are earning their keep.

For decades many active managers were at odds with the academic community. Most studies have suggested that active managers cannot dependably outperform the market. Vanguard has built a giant business capitalizing on this widely held belief. One professor from the University of Notre Dame, K.J. Martijn Cremers, has come to active mutual fund managers’ defense with his “Active Share” metric.

His 2006 paper, coauthored by Antti Petajisto, was called “How Active Is Your Fund Manager? A New Measure That Predicts Performance.” Active Share quantifies how much an actively managed portfolio differs from a benchmark.

Cremers, now working with Ankur Pareek of Rutgers Business School, has a new paper: “Patient Capital Outperformance: The Investment Skill of High Active Share Managers Who Trade Infrequently.” Its first sentence clearly lays out the main point: Among high Active Share portfolios, only those with patient investment strategies–holding stocks at least two years–outperform.

Full Article