In the Media

SXSW
Austin, TX
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

SXSW

Since 2000, one-third more women than men have graduated college, a topic Jon Birger explored in his book DATE-ONOMICS. With greater education comes greater income: Wages for U.S. women age 25-34 have risen 13% since 1980 whereas men's have fallen 20%. 

Indeed, millennial women are so outpacing men in education, it's inevitable they will be their generation's high earners. What does this mean for the future of advertising? 

The rise of millennial women portends big change in how luxury cars, jewelry and other premium products once purchased mainly by men will be marketed. Translation: opportunity for advertisers who recognize the shift—and peril for those who don't.

Kristina Durante is an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School and a social psychologist interested in the biology of decision-making. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Austin.

Her research lies at the intersection of social psychology, evolutionary biology, and consumer decision-making. Kristina's research program focuses on how our evolved biology (ancestral ecology and internal physiological systems) and our modern social environment interact to influence behavior.

Kristina's areas of expertise include women's consumer choice and luxury spending, family consumer decisions, hormones and behavior, and the psychological consequences of uncertainty.

Kristina's work has been published in the leading academic journals in marketing, psychology, and biology. Kristina spoke about her research in a recent TEDx talk. Her studies have been featured in USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Chicago Tribune, as well as hundreds of other media outlets worldwide. Kristina spent seven years as an entertainment publicist before entering academe. 

SXSW dedicates itself to helping creative people achieve their goals. Founded in 1987 in Austin, Texas, SXSW is best known for its conference and festivals that celebrate the convergence of the interactive, film, and music industries.

SXSW



New York, NY
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

NJBIZ

U.S. News & World Report revealed its 2018 rankings of the nation's best graduate schools on Tuesday, rating 100 or more colleges and universities in a variety of programs.

Based on the rankings, New Jersey is well-represented in a number of fields, including business, law, medicine and more.

Among the nation's best business schools, Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick tied for No. 50 with the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University.

Rutgers ranked tops among New Jersey colleges.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, March 14, 2017

NJBIZ

Karen Kessler, the founder and president of Evergreen PR, has been named the chair of the executive business cabinet at the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School, the institute announced.

Kessler is known for her sound counsel and approach to handling ethical dilemmas faced by a high-profile client base. In January, she was named to the NJBIZ Power 100 list.

James Abruzzo, co-founder of the institute, said in a statement that he feels Kessler's experience will be a huge plus for the institute.

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Newark, NJ
Thursday, March 9, 2017

New Jersey 101.5

If you have their app, there's a free cup of coffee waiting for you at Wawa every Friday morning in March.

In its New York market, medium coffee only costs a $1 on the day after the New York Rangers win, if ordered using their app.

The offers are the latest in the "app wars" between coffee and convenience stores, including McDonald's, Starbucks and 7-Eleven.

"Coffee is the intro. It's the opportunity to leverage the power of the coffee, the power of the caffeine, the taste, the convenience and the flexibility it may have with the hope that folks will come back and buy other higher margin, higher profit products," said Sandy Becker, professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School.

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Sydney, Australia
Thursday, March 9, 2017

What's On Sydney

Lighthouse Lecture Series: US and European Perspectives on Diversity Management and Inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are central to Australian multiculturalism and essential to our organizations. And what better way to recognize Harmony Day on Tuesday 21 March than by exploring US and European perspectives on diversity management and inclusion.

Join Professor S Bruce Dowton, Vice-Chancellor, Macquarie University and internationally recognised scholars Professor Alain Klarsfeld, Research Professor, Toulouse Business School and Professor Nancy DiTomaso, Distinguished Professor of Management and Global Business, Rutgers Business School, as they explore issues of diversity and inclusion as seen in France and the USA, respectively.

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Identities.Mic
New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, March 9, 2017

Identities.Mic

President Donald Trump wants to ban refugees from entering the United States. But these Rutgers Business School students want to help refugees live with dignity.

Rutgers Business School seniors Gia Farooqi, Hasan Usmani, Moneeb Mian and alumna Hana Lakhani — who are all Muslim — pitched Roshni Rides to the international social entrepreneurship competition Hult Prize for a $1 million prize.

The group won the regional finals of the competition in March, out of 50,000 applicants, coincidentally a few days before Trump announced a new executive order for a 120-day ban on refugees entering the U.S. The team beat out schools like Harvard, Yale and Purdue, and is one of five regional winners across the world, Umair Masood, Rutgers' campus director for the Hult Prize, said in an email.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Monday, March 6, 2017

NJBIZ

When Jose Martinez built his app and website, healthylunchmenus, in 2010, he didn't quite know how to get it onto the market.

Then, he got in touch with LATISM, Latinos in Tech Innovation and Social Media, which led him to a startup pitch competition in 2013 in Silicon Valley.

He took second place.

The idea was to allow people to instantly search for all the healthy dishes at restaurants around them — almost like a single filter for search options on a food finding app.

After the competition, he was told by many in Silicon Valley to drop everything in New Jersey and move in order to start networking and building up on his idea.

But he couldn't.

As the son of first-generation immigrant parents from the Dominican Republic, Martinez didn't have family to financially lean on. So, he took the safe route of staying back in Lyndhurst to continue his design company, Pixl Graphx, with his business partner.

"I grew up in an urban area (Passaic), and we are not taught to be entrepreneurial or tech savvy,"Martinez said. "Lots of schools in urban areas lack technology, so we grow up with a major disadvantage."

The launch of Rutgers Business School's Black and Latino Tech Initiative last week aims to solve that problem in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.

Experts say African-Americans and Latinos have been unable to network in the same financial circles as others. It's a problem Wall Street has recently focused on.

"Less than 2 percent of all technology startups are led by black or Latino individuals," Lyneir Richardson, executive director of Rutgers' Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, said.

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Newark, NJ
Monday, March 6, 2017

New Jersey 101.5

The Assembly Regulatory Oversight and Reform and Federal Relations Committee could vote in the coming weeks on a proposed measure to create new liquor licenses for restaurants.

To better understand the issue, the panel has reached out to several experts for testimony, including Rutgers Business School finance professor Morris Davis, who is also the director of the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers.

He pointed out there are certain areas in New Jersey where are liquor licenses are plentiful, and the cost of those licenses is relatively inexpensive, but in other areas licenses are extremely scarce.

"The cost of a liquor license in those areas could be $500,000 or more, so the problem is there's no mechanism to enable budding restaurant owners to acquire a license at a reasonable price in areas where there's clearly a demand for restaurants," he said.

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FiOS News 1
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

FiOS News 1

On this edition of "This is Jersey with Gary Gellman," they report on the 80th Annual New Jersey State Chamber of Commerce Walk to Washington.

For 79 years, Chamber members have boarded a special Amtrak charter train and traveled to the nation's Capital to discuss with the state's top political leadership how to make New Jersey a better place to do business.

The event has grown to include corporate executives, mid-size business owners, entrepreneurs, state government and legislative leaders who network with each other and discuss New Jersey's economic situation with the Congressional Delegation.

During the train ride to Washington, DC, Andy Gogates, corporate relations manager, Rutgers Business School MBA program, is interviewed: begins at 11:17  https://youtu.be/7ajgNHlYgkg?t=11m17s into the video.

The tradition began in 1937 when several of the state's top business executives took a train to Washington to have dinner with New Jersey's congressional delegation - and the rest is history. Soon the event's popularity made it necessary to charter a private train to the nation's capital. And because everyone on the train walks the aisles, discussing issues and opportunities the event became known as the Walk to Washington.

Watch the video



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

NJBIZ

The Institute for Ethical Leadership at the Rutgers Business School announced it has appointed Dr. Joanne B. Ciulla its newest academic director.

Ciulla will also become professor of leadership ethics at Rutgers Business School's Department of Management and Global Business.

"I was attracted to Rutgers because I saw great potential in the Institute for Ethical Leadership to serve the academic, business, nonprofit and government communities," Ciulla said.

"We are pleased and consider ourselves fortunate to have attracted Joanne to the IEL," James Abruzzo, institute co-founder, said. "Her values, energy and desire to make the IEL a significant force for good are aligned with ours."

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NJBIZ

 

Newark, NJ
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

NJBIZ

The Black and Latino Tech Initiative, a collaborative program with the goal to aid early-stage companies with black and Latino co-founders with viable business models, will launch this week in Newark, organizers said.

Mukesh Patel, the entrepreneur in residence and executive coach, said the group aims to give resources and mentorship to these early-stage companies in an effort to help them gain traction and attract more private capital and gain admission into quality accelerators.

"We're building relationships with (venture capitalists), angels and accelerators committed to investing in quality teams of color," Patel said.

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Newark, NJ
Monday, February 27, 2017

Black Enterprise

On March 2, Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development will hold its Black and Latino Tech Initiative Launch (BLT). The free event (registration is required) offers black and Hispanic tech entrepreneurs valuable advice on preparing their businesses for an accelerator program as well as on-site networking opportunities with venture capitalists and accelerators.

"Less than 2% of all technology startups are led by black or Latino individuals," says CUEED executive director Lyneir Richardson. "The reasons for this are two-fold: black and Latino entrepreneurs have difficulty securing capital, and they also have challenges building business teams that get accepted into top tier accelerators. Our BLT Launch event will seek to remedy this situation by providing scientists, inventors, and technology innovators with essential info that will give their ideas a chance to be developed, funded, and launched into the marketplace."

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WalletHub

 

Newark, NJ
Saturday, February 18, 2017

WalletHub

Ask the Experts

John Longo, professor of professional practice in the finance & economics at Rutgers Business School

What was your first credit card? How was the experience? What would you change?

My first credit card was from Discover Card. In the 1990s it was one of the few credit cards that gave you cash back. I liked the notion of getting a credit card that paid you cash and had no annual fee. It was a good experience since I tried to pay my bill in full each month.

When do you recommend people get their first credit card?

I would recommend people get a credit card with a low limit (e.g., $500), as soon as they understand the fundamentals of money and banking. This might be as early as 16 for a high school student that is responsible with money, or in your late teens to early 20's for a college age person. A high school student would likely need a parent to co-sign for the card. Having a credit card and using it responsibly can help you develop a credit score, which will be important for future large purchases, such as obtaining a car loan or mortgage.

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Yahoo Finance
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Yahoo Finance

M&T Bank and Rutgers Business School have launched a new partnership for the second annual Rutgers Business School New Jersey County College Case Competition, with M&T serving as the presenting sponsor of this year's competition.

In addition to financial support for the competition, M&T will offer their bankers as advisers to participating community college students throughout New Jersey. Established by Rutgers Business School in 2016, the competition requires students to analyze a real-life business case and present their findings and recommendations to a panel of Rutgers Business School judges.

"We look forward to developing a strong strategic partnership with M&T Bank and working together to train students of every background to become tomorrow's business leaders," said Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.

Robert Kurland, associate dean of undergraduate programs at Rutgers Business School-Newark, added: "With the support of M&T Bank, we are able to extend an invitation to additional county colleges which allows more students the opportunity to gain real-world business experience and showcases some of the best future business leaders in New Jersey."

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On The Banks

 

New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, February 13, 2017

On Rhe Banks

With all the hoopla of National Signing Day behind us, I had a chance to catch up with, Burlington Township’s and 2017 Scarlet Knight Signee, Everett Wormley for an exclusive interview for all of our “On the Banks” fans to get to know Ev a little better. To see my scouting report on Wormley, simply click here.

What was it about Rutgers University, outside of Football related reasons, that helped you make your decision to attend school there?

Rutgers Business School is elite, and since I want to major in marketing it was a good match. Plus New York City being so close presented great internship opportunities.

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Crain's
New York, NY
Sunday, February 12, 2017

Crain's New York Business

Recent political events may have provided an opening for Uber's competitors to take a bite out of the ride-sharing service's dominance in New York. During demonstrations at JFK Airport two weeks ago over President Donald Trump's travel ban, Uber's response was regarded by some to be more in league with the White House than with the protesters, and a #DeleteUber campaign went viral. In the aftermath, more than 200,000 customers shut down their accounts, The New York Times reported. That led to a related bump in downloads for Lyft and two other apps, Via and Juno.

"This is a great opportunity for Lyft, particularly in this industry, where it's not really clear that Uber's services are much different from the others," said Michael Barnett, a professor of management at Rutgers Business School. "Lyft has gotten customers to try their app who probably wouldn't have bothered to switch if it wasn't for this."

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Brick, NJ
Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Asbury Park Press

Bob's Video Time will close on Saturday after 27 years, its owners said this week, admitting that they had no answers left for technology that was making their store obsolete.

Bob and Donna Karpodinis said they didn't want to close; they are too young to retire. But consumers can watch anything they want without leaving their home. The holiday shopping season fizzled. And they decided to pull the plug.

Artists still make movies. Consumers still watch them. But "in today's world, the technology has become one that has disenfranchised local merchants that delivered that content," said Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"Video stores no longer service a need that's significant," Rutgers' Kalan said. "I would commend whoever ran the Brick store that they outlasted virtually (everyone else)."

Full Article



ValueWalk

 

Newark, NJ
Tuesday, February 7, 2017

ValueWalk

An exceedingly helpful paper on the topic of this column (the merit of valuations-based market timing) was recently published by Valentin Dimitrov of Rutgers Business School and Prem C. Jain of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. It is titled: Shiller’s CAPE: Market Timing and Risk.

The paper states that: "We find that even when CAPE is in its ninth decile, future 10-year stock returns, on average, are higher than future returns on 10-year Treasurys. Thus, the results are largely consistent with market efficiency. Only when CAPE is very high, say, CAPE is in the upper half of the tenth decile (CAPE higher than 27.6), future 10-year stock returns, on average, are lower than those on 10-year U.S. Treasurys." So the paper is not generally supportive of the Valuation-Informed Indexing concept. However, it provides a wealth of data and analysis that I believe should be reviewed by all with an interest in coming to a better understanding of many questions raised by Robert Shiller's "revolutionary" (his word) 1981 research showing that valuations affect long-term stock returns.

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Teen Vogue
New York, NY
Friday, February 3, 2017

Teen Vogue

In the early 1900s, men formed the first parts of what would grow to be the National Football League, or NFL. The sport was presided over by men and played by men, and has long had a stereotypically male fan-base.

But fast-forward to current day, and the NFL's fan-base is nearly half female — around 45% (which likely comes as no surprise to, well, any of us who are fans.)

Of course, you can't talk about the NFL and women without acknowledging problems in the league.

Aside from these more serious issues, though, there's also the past stumbles with marketing to women —like the notorious "shrink it and pink it" logic of women's gear, which basically meant creating women's jerseys that looked like men's, only smaller and pink.

"What marketers have found is that when you have a product that women start to take to; as soon as marketers started to go for women, they lost women because women were like, 'hey I just want this product, it doesn't need to be girly,'" Kristina Durante, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School, tells Teen Vogue. "We don't have to have just one gender role that is hyper-feminized," she adds. "We can be whatever feels right for us."

"Women are more independent and have more buying power than ever before," says Durante. "We have more opportunities and are outpacing men when it comes to education." And then take into account that women make up about a third of fantasy sports players. A rising number play football. Many are segueing into coaching, announcing, and executive roles in the sport. And this weekend for the Super Bowl, upward of 50 million of us will be watching.

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Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Rutgers University Newark

During the summer between my sophomore and junior year, I studied at the European Business School in Germany. While I was there, I was mesmerized by the beautiful countryside in Oestrich-Winkel, the town where the business school is located.

I didn't spend all my time in Germany though. I also traveled to France and the Netherlands. Some of the most beautiful cities and towns I visited were Frankfurt, Rüdesheim am Rhein, Strasbourg, Amsterdam and Berlin. The cultural differences between the U.S. and the European countries I visited were a delightful surprise to me.

The classes at the European Business School were challenging, but Rutgers Business School had prepared me to do well. The classes that helped me the most were many of the intro classes such as microeconomics, finance, and supply chain management. I also put my communication, time management and presentation skills to good use. I developed some of those skills through my involvement with the Marketing and Management Society - I proudly serve as the organization's vice president. Rutgers provided me with the necessary tools - and confidence - to venture abroad, to learn more about the international business environment and to gain an experience that has impacted my life and ambitions.

Carmelo Martinez is currently a junior, double majoring in accounting and management information systems at Rutgers Business School.

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