In the Media

PR Daily
New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, August 4, 2015

PR Daily Europe

Nobody likes crafting a stellar press release, blog entry or even social media post, only to watch it disappear into a black hole with little or no exposure.

Here are three ways to optimize your online PR content for greater reach, readership and results:

1. Punch up press releases via social media. A/B test your press release headlines on social networks to compare effectiveness using metrics like retweets, favorites, mentions and clicks. The metrics will tell you which is more effective, removing the guesswork and ensuring a more productive release.

"First, create two headlines for an article or press release that you think will perform well,” says Peter Methot, managing director of executive education at Rutgers Business School. “Then tweet both of these headlines roughly one hour apart and compare the data for each tweet."

The headline that has received more clicks, mentions and RTs obviously performed better. Use this one for the press release or any other type of content you’re distributing. “Let the data be the determining factor—not a gut instinct,” Methot says.

Full Article



Education Post
Hong Kong
Friday, July 31, 2015

Education Post

Asian women are in the vanguard of a revolution in the world of business education, new research shows.

The once male-dominated field is changing fast as more women enroll in university MBA courses across the globe, with Asian women leading the pace of change, according to a report in British newspaper The Independent.

Even in traditionally conservative Japan, known for the dearth of women leaders in commerce, industry, and government, the MBA program in Tokyo, run by Canada’s Desautels Faculty of Management, is almost half female.

Meanwhile, in the US Professor Lei Lei became the first-ever woman to become dean of Rutgers Business School in New Jersey. Of the full-time MBA students who will graduate from Rutgers in 2016, 51 per cent are women.

Lei says that because CEOs are typically male, more top corporations are becoming interested in recruiting women with leadership potential. Special events are being held for business hopefuls to get mentoring from senior women executives at companies such as Avon and New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Lei says these kinds of events help attract more women to study for an MBA, assisting students as they strive to "build a strong belief in themselves, about their future, and their success in their careers because they see the role models come to the classroom to talk to them".

Full Article



NorthJersey.com
Hackensack, NJ
Wednesday, July 29, 2015

NorthJersey.com

As old buildings tumble and new ones go up in the evolving downtown Hackensack redevelopment, experts say success rides on how the transformation is marketed, and some city businesspeople are clamoring to start the publicity campaign soon, fearing that time is slipping away.

Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School, said that however the alliance markets the downtown, it had better deliver.

"A brand, when you really think about it, is the setting up of potential expectations for potential customers," Kalan said. He said cities must find what it is about their location that stands out from competitors and play to that strength.

Full Article



Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, July 27, 2015

U.S. News & World Report

As an MBA student at the College of Charleston, Erin Frey was sometimes one of few women in the room. Of the roughly 30 people in her cohort, about one-third were women, she says.

But that one-third is still substantial when women make up less than 33 percent of students at dozens of business schools, according to U.S. News data.

When schools focus on gender diversity in the classroom, they can help companies gain a diverse set of business leaders, says Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Because CEOs are typically men, "more and more major corporations, are interested in recruiting the future potential female leaders," Lei says.

Full Article



Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Friday, July 24, 2015

Through the Park

Through the Park blog provides an inside look into life as a student in the Rutgers Full-Time MBA program. Explore this blog to gain insights about student life, academics and career management at Rutgers Business School. This blog is maintained by the Rutgers Association of Marketing and Strategy (RAMS).

Summer Internship Series: Vanessa, Joseph and Swathi

Vanessa, concentrating in Marketing and Marketing Research Insights & Analytics, is working at Campbell Soup Company this summer...

Joseph is a Supply Chain Management student spending his summer working in Boise, ID...

Swathi is pursuing dual concentrations in Pharmaceutical Management and Marketing, as well as an MS in Biomedical Sciences...

Through the Park



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 22, 2015

The Good Men Project

Just as humans have evolved all sorts of ways to cope in the world—from opposable thumbs to written language—people have developed a knack for rationalizing behavior in themselves that they would label negatively in others. Theft, for example: stealing something once, especially something minor, doesn’t warrant labeling in most people’s eyes; to be called a ‘thief’ requires making a habit of theft.

Thanks to this kind of rationalization, simply knowing better doesn’t stop us from actually doing better. Moral compromises and indiscretions are easily justified in hindsight.

So if knowing better doesn’t always lead to acting better, how can people combat potentially harmful (and hurtful) lapses of judgment?

Oliver Sheldon, of Rutgers Business School, authored a study looking at how individuals distinguish bad behavior from bad character. As he explained, people find it easier to excuse incidents of negative behavior if they view them as isolated:

“People often compartmentalize their experiences of temptation, making it much easier for them to rationalize the behavior. They might say, ‘Just because I took office supplies home for personal use one time, that doesn’t mean I’m a thief.”

Full Article



NJ.com
Belleville, NJ
Thursday, July 16, 2015

NJ.com

A local man has filed a lawsuit claiming Interim Township Manager Kevin Esposito used his dual role as tax assessor to drive down the value of a property the township was hoping to purchase.

“By serving as the Township Manager for the same municipality as he serves as Tax Assessor, Defendant Esposito placed himself in a position in which his duties as Assessor were subordinate to his duties as Manager," the suit reads.

A spokesman for the state Attorney General's office could not immediately be reached for comment on the arrangement.

Ann Buchholtz, a professor of leadership and ethics and research director at The Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School, said holding both positions would not necessarily be an inherent conflict of interest, though the assessment of a property that the township was hoping to purchase would likely cross the line.

She added that many towns allow residents to appeal their assessments to a separate board or other party outside of the assessor's office, which might mitigate any such concerns. Murphy said Belleville residents can direct their concerns to the Essex County Board of Taxation.

"Certainly, if this person has no recourse they have every right to suggest it's a conflict of interest," Buchholtz said.

Full Article



CardHub.com
Washington D.C.
Thursday, July 16, 2015

Will credit cards be used 15 or 20 years from now? In what form? Professor Sengun Yeniyurt: "My feeling is that credit will still be around in 10 or 15 years, but perhaps the plastic cards will be replaced with electronic forms such as cell phone based apps."

To read the full story:



Entrepreneur
Irvine, CA
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Entrepreneur

This year, I decided to try something completely new, so I jumped face-first into the world of contributed content.

In a short amount of time, I've been able to develop and maintain numerous relationships. I've learned a lot, from how best to contact websites for the first time, to guest contributor applications, down to the writing process itself.

I've made my share of mistakes along the way, so I'm offering up these tips for anyone looking to join me in the content mines of the Web.

Terri Kurtzberg, professor of global business at Rutgers Business School, puts the idea of emailing strangers into perspective in her essay, "Overcoming the E-mail Disadvantage" (Under review at the International Journal of Conflict Management)

Full Article and Tips



NJ.com
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

NJ.com

Jet.com, a new online shopping club with corporate offices in New Jersey, is positioning itself as an alternative to both traditional shopping clubs like Costco and online retailers like Amazon.com.

But the key, says Len Stavish, chief operating officer at Cranbury-based auto parts retailer CARiD.com, will be making a swift positive first impression on consumers.

No easy feat, given the power and deep pockets of Amazon, says Marc Kalan, a professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

"They're not going to have the ability, I suspect, to offer the array of products that Amazon has," he says. The Jeff Bezos empire has fulfillment centers in Logan Township, Robbinsville and Avenel. Kalan adds that the experience of shopping online doesn't exactly replicate the experience of wandering the aisles of discount shopping clubs, ones dotted with tempting sample tables and product demonstrations.

"The allure of Costco is to stimulate impulsive purchases," he says. "That's going to be a bit more of a challenge online."

Full Article



Woodland Park
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Bloomberg Business

To speed deliveries in the New York metropolitan area, Amazon has quietly leased a 75,000-square-foot warehouse in Moonachie, according to real estate industry sources.

Amazon, which rarely discloses much about its operations, made no announcement about the Moonachie warehouse and did not respond to several requests for comment.

Paula Rosenblum, managing partner of RSR Research, a Miami-based retail technology consulting firm, speculated that the distribution center might be used for Amazon's Prime Now service, which offers one-hour delivery for $7.99 or two-hour delivery for free of a limited selection of goods to select areas. According to the Amazon website, Prime Now is available in parts of New York City, but not in North Jersey.

"Companies have to find ways to manage their supply chains to deliver a wide variety of products to customers and to do so quickly," said David Dobrzykowski, a professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School. "Reducing transit times by strategically locating warehouses can be a key to a company's success."

Full Article



New York, NY
Tuesday, July 14, 2015

The Wall Street Journal

Full Article PDF

In May, Michael Armstrong of Southern Co. called two students he’d recruited from a Southeastern public college to wish them a happy graduation and fix their start dates in the fall. The calls went to voice mail. Then the emails came in.

Each student thanked him for the opportunity, but declined the jobs they accepted months before. Other, better jobs had simply come along, they wrote, leaving Mr. Armstrong, campus recruiting lead for the Atlanta utility, with spots to fill.

One of the strongest graduate hiring seasons in recent memory has had an unpleasant byproduct for campus recruiters, who say their college hires are jilting them at the last minute. The trend has vexed hiring managers, flustered students and left colleges torn between helping graduates get ahead and staying in the good graces of companies that recruit on campus.

In some cases, students with accepted offers become more attractive to recruiters, career-services officers said.

“You get more marriage proposals once you’re engaged than before,” said Eugene Gentile, director of the office of career management at Rutgers Business School.

This spring, one Rutgers student accepted an offer from a top accounting firm only to receive an offer from a direct competitor, which likely knew the student had already committed, he said. The student ended up backing out of the first offer and choosing the second firm.

Full Article PDF



CBS Moneywatch
New York, NY
Tuesday, July 14, 2015

CBS Moneywatch

Around the world, the formal announcement of a final nuclear development agreement between a U.S.-led group of six nations and Iran prompted widespread speculation about just what the deal would mean across a range of activities, from geopolitical jockeying to oil production. Not the least among those implications is what the deal might mean for doing business with, and in, Iran.

But since the U.S. started imposing economic sanctions on Iran in 1987, Tehran found itself increasingly isolated, plagued by high unemployment, a currency in steep decline, deteriorating infrastructure and an exodus of young Iranians looking for a better life abroad.

"This younger Iranian generation was not even born during the Revolution of 1979" when the American embassy staff was taken as hostages, said Farok Contractor of Rutgers Business School Newark. 'They are more predisposed to American movies, music and culture."

Full Article



Austin, TX
Friday, July 10, 2015

The Texas Tribune

The pharmaceutical company Sanofi will fund up to $2.4 million a year in biomedical research at the University of Texas System under a deal announced Thursday, the latest in a trend toward more research funding from private industry as government research money dwindles.

But watchdogs say universities have to be vigilant to prevent conflicts of interest as such funding relationships become more common. Private funding for research at the UT System has grown nearly 30 percent in the last five years, administrators said.

"The kinds of questions that have to be asked, from a public perspective, are how broad is this agreement, and what kinds of things does it govern?" said Michael Santoro, professor of business ethics at Rutgers Business School. "What kinds of things is Sanofi getting for $2.4 million?"

Full Article



GlobeStreet.com
Newark, NJ
Friday, July 10, 2015

GlobeSt.com
Seasoned real estate professionals say they wish they’d had a college commercial real estate curriculum so they’d have been better equipped to handle the industry, university CRE-program faculty members tell GlobeSt.com.

We spoke with several college-level CRE educators about these programs and why they are so valuable for today’s young professionals.

Morris A. Davis, academic director and Paul V. Profeta chair of the Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School, Newark, NJ, tells GlobeSt.com that the Rutgers Center for Real Estate is going to be a pioneer in producing industry relevant research—not just for the state of New Jersey where it is located and not just for the New York metropolitan market, but for the US. “Our mindset is, what’s great for New Jersey and what’s great for New York is great for the country.”

One adage Rutgers’ Center has is that “everything that we touch should be the absolute best in our space,” says Davis. “This includes academic programs, as well as the access to the top real estate professionals for our students and the opportunities we are making available for them to interact on a very close level with those professionals.

By treating real estate as an essential element and aspect of business, government and society, we are developing programs that will produce world-class talent that will help to change the landscape in years to come. We are inspiring the next generation of real estate leaders.”

Full Article



CBS Money Watch
New York, NY
Thursday, July 9, 2015

CBS Money Watch

Frantic efforts by the Chinese government to halt a plunge in stock prices are paying off -- for now. A day after suffering another sharp drop, equities listed on Shanghai's stock market rose 5.8 percent Thursday, and Hong Kong's Hang Sen gained 3.8 percent. Financial markets in Japan and South Korea also rebounded.

But the $3 trillion loss in market value in China in recent weeks -- more than 10 times the gross domestic product of Greece -- amounts to a foghorn-like warning for the People's Republic. The message: Building a modern economy with functional capital markets, especially at China's usual double-quick tempo, is a massively risky exercise. Or, to cite a popular Chinese proverb, be careful what you wish for.

"It's a double blow to their credibility," said Michael Santoro, professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School. "First they were so vigorous in promoting stock ownership, and now they had to intervene. Now there's not much more they can do, but in the process they set off a second wave of panic."

For perspective, China's stock exchanges are nowhere near the size of the U.S. markets. But Santoro explains that the experiment in using stocks to raise capital was an effort "to try and bring some kind of market discipline to the banking system." The goal is to substitute the relative discipline of the market for the kind of government-guaranteed lending that favors the politically connected in China.

Full Article



Rutgers Today
New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, July 6, 2015

Rutgers Today

Martinho, a rising junior, was among 15 Newark high school students who got an eight-day introduction to how multiple supply chains relate to the success of a business and its community. The Rutgers Business School’s first Supply Chain Education Partnership Program also aims to give local high school students a sense of supply chain management as a career.

“We’re trying to get students in the pipeline early,” said Kevin Lyons, a professor in the supply chain management program. “When they think about business school, they often think about finance and accounting and we want them to see what supply chain is all about.”

Full Article



New York, NY
Monday, July 6, 2015

Black Enterprise

No matter what industry you’re in, excellent presentation skills can dramatically enhance your career trajectory. “[Even] in [today’s] digital age, making a strong presentation still remains a critical skill,” says Rutgers Business School Professor Marc Kalan in a recent article. If you’re presenting regularly, chances are you’re pretty good at it. But if not, read on.

Whether you’re a seasoned speaker or someone just starting out, sharpening your skill set is never a bad idea. While there are numerous strategies that can help you deliver greater value and effectively engage your audience, reaching for them all at once can be unproductive and overwhelming.

These three tips will help you master your presentations and present like a pro:

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Marketplace
Newark, NJ
Thursday, July 2, 2015

Marketplace

Just three years ago, Chicago had four black-owned banks. Now there are two, and regulators have told one of them — Illinois Service Federal Savings and Loan— to raise more capital or risk a shutdown. The decline is part of a national trend. Unlike the more-segregated days when these banks were founded, African-American customers can now take their business elsewhere.

However, black-owned banks provide a link to a proud history— and, research says, they may do something a lot more important.

John Taylor, who runs the Community Reinvestment Coalition, sees community banks like Illinois Service disappearing all over the country.

“That’s really the challenge,” he says. “Disappearing with them is the personal commitment of boards of directors to make sure that those communities, those neighborhoods, prosper."

For black and Latino entrepreneurs looking for a bank loan, “The playing field is not level,” Rutgers Business School professor Jerome Williams says. “There’s already a mark against you in terms of your background in applying for a loan.”

In that context, banks like Illinois Service seem even more important.

Full Article



The Record
Newark, NJ
Thursday, July 2, 2015

The Record

North Jersey businesses are taking advantage of the sharing economy — with office space.

More businesses are turning to office shares, spaces that are essentially rented out as needed for an hourly or monthly fee. This office model, which experts say has been evolving in the real estate world, offers an opportunity for businesses of all sizes.

"This works very well for entrepreneurs and small businesses who don't want to spend the money" on long-term leases, said Ronald Shapiro, executive director of the Rutgers Business School's Center for Real Estate. He added that sometimes larger businesses take advantage of these spaces as they try to downsize, too.

Full Article