In the Media

ValueWalk

 

Newark, NJ
Tuesday, February 7, 2017

ValueWalk

An exceedingly helpful paper on the topic of this column (the merit of valuations-based market timing) was recently published by Valentin Dimitrov of Rutgers Business School and Prem C. Jain of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. It is titled: Shiller’s CAPE: Market Timing and Risk.

The paper states that: "We find that even when CAPE is in its ninth decile, future 10-year stock returns, on average, are higher than future returns on 10-year Treasurys. Thus, the results are largely consistent with market efficiency. Only when CAPE is very high, say, CAPE is in the upper half of the tenth decile (CAPE higher than 27.6), future 10-year stock returns, on average, are lower than those on 10-year U.S. Treasurys." So the paper is not generally supportive of the Valuation-Informed Indexing concept. However, it provides a wealth of data and analysis that I believe should be reviewed by all with an interest in coming to a better understanding of many questions raised by Robert Shiller's "revolutionary" (his word) 1981 research showing that valuations affect long-term stock returns.

Full Article



Teen Vogue
New York, NY
Friday, February 3, 2017

Teen Vogue

In the early 1900s, men formed the first parts of what would grow to be the National Football League, or NFL. The sport was presided over by men and played by men, and has long had a stereotypically male fan-base.

But fast-forward to current day, and the NFL's fan-base is nearly half female — around 45% (which likely comes as no surprise to, well, any of us who are fans.)

Of course, you can't talk about the NFL and women without acknowledging problems in the league.

Aside from these more serious issues, though, there's also the past stumbles with marketing to women —like the notorious "shrink it and pink it" logic of women's gear, which basically meant creating women's jerseys that looked like men's, only smaller and pink.

"What marketers have found is that when you have a product that women start to take to; as soon as marketers started to go for women, they lost women because women were like, 'hey I just want this product, it doesn't need to be girly,'" Kristina Durante, Ph.D., an associate professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School, tells Teen Vogue. "We don't have to have just one gender role that is hyper-feminized," she adds. "We can be whatever feels right for us."

"Women are more independent and have more buying power than ever before," says Durante. "We have more opportunities and are outpacing men when it comes to education." And then take into account that women make up about a third of fantasy sports players. A rising number play football. Many are segueing into coaching, announcing, and executive roles in the sport. And this weekend for the Super Bowl, upward of 50 million of us will be watching.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Rutgers University Newark

During the summer between my sophomore and junior year, I studied at the European Business School in Germany. While I was there, I was mesmerized by the beautiful countryside in Oestrich-Winkel, the town where the business school is located.

I didn't spend all my time in Germany though. I also traveled to France and the Netherlands. Some of the most beautiful cities and towns I visited were Frankfurt, Rüdesheim am Rhein, Strasbourg, Amsterdam and Berlin. The cultural differences between the U.S. and the European countries I visited were a delightful surprise to me.

The classes at the European Business School were challenging, but Rutgers Business School had prepared me to do well. The classes that helped me the most were many of the intro classes such as microeconomics, finance, and supply chain management. I also put my communication, time management and presentation skills to good use. I developed some of those skills through my involvement with the Marketing and Management Society - I proudly serve as the organization's vice president. Rutgers provided me with the necessary tools - and confidence - to venture abroad, to learn more about the international business environment and to gain an experience that has impacted my life and ambitions.

Carmelo Martinez is currently a junior, double majoring in accounting and management information systems at Rutgers Business School.

Full Article



Financial Buzz
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Financial Buzz

SEMPO, the world's largest nonprofit organization serving the search and digital marketing industry and the marketing professionals engaged in it, announced today that Mike Moran, long-time search marketing author and consultant, has joined SEMPO’s Board of Directors. He will be responsible for working with the SEMPO Board to drive strategies designed to increase industry awareness of website and on-site search.

"Mike's deep understanding of the search engine marketing industry, together with his digital marketing consulting background, further strengthens our outstanding Board," said Mike Gullaksen, president of SEMPO. "We are delighted to welcome Mike to the SEMPO Board."

"I am honored to join SEMPO's Board of Directors," Moran said.  He teaches digital marketing at Rutgers Business School Executive Education Online Mini-MBA™ program and is a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business.

Full Article



Rutgers Today
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Rutgers Today

Rutgers-New Brunswick students can ‘Halo home’ with the help of caring, entrepreneurial student

Starting this semester, Rutgers University-New Brunswick students who find themselves alone late at night can text a request for students to walk them home five nights a week.

Rutgers senior Daniel Reji envisioned the text-a-friend service as a sophomore researching sexual assault on college campuses nationwide. When his research revealed that buddy systems – traveling in groups of two or more – are often the best way to stay safe, he knew the next step was creating a start-up to help students who needed a late-night friend to find one.

Daniel Reji, a Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick senior, started SafeHalo with Jamie Farren, a School of Communication and Information senior, so students can text requests for safe walks home.

"The same way you get an Uber, I thought, what if you could request two students to walk you home – judgment free, stigma free, actually free?" says Reji, a marketing major with a concentration in entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick.

Reji and Farren have assembled an outstanding team of "Halos," volunteers from a variety of majors, interests and backgrounds who have one thing in common: they want to help fellow students, says Alfred Blake, assistant director of undergraduate entrepreneurship programs in the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development in Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick. One of the challenges of scaling their model will be for other schools to do the same.

Full Article



Financial Times
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, January 29, 2017

Financial Times

Insead is top of the 2017 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking of the best 100 full-time MBA programmes. It is the second year that the multi-campus international business school has taken the number one spot, after claiming it for the first time last year.

U.S. schools are rebuilding their strength in this ranking, with their number increasing to 51. Six of the eight new or returning schools are from the U.S.

Among these six US schools, Rutgers Business School in New Jersey is the highest new entrant at 70 (and No. 37 in the U.S.).

Full Article and Rankings



Wharton, NJ
Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Customized Distribution Services (CDS)

Customized Distribution Services (CDS), a national provider of third-party logistics and warehousing services, is pleased to announce the inaugural recipient of its Supply Chain Management Education Scholarship, Ms. Colleen Graner. An undergraduate senior student at Rutgers Business School, Ms. Graner is pursuing multiple degrees in Supply Chain Management, Marketing, and Management and Global Business.

Ms. Graner possesses an impressive amount of hands-on industry experience through multiple internships. She also maintains a strong record of leadership skills through volunteer work and her position in the Rutgers Business School Ambassador Program.

CDS' scholarship initiative aims to help students realize their higher education goals regardless of financial capacity, and pursue a rewarding career in one or more avenues of the supply chain industry.

Full Article



The New Stack
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, January 24, 2017

The New Stack

Getting started with a new project, business or application idea is a challenge for anyone, but this challenge can increase exponentially if an entrepreneur is Black, Latinx or a woman. Many first-generation immigrant entrepreneurs miss out on the 'family and friends' seed funding round their Ivy League white male counterparts may get. Others are faced with the task of securing capital with a business potential that isn't in the billions.

Without minority entrepreneurs being able to access these resources, the technology ecosystem and the world as a whole will find itself lacking. "That means important, profitable businesses are not being launched and not growing to scale, and really that means that our world is losing out on innovations that we all want and we all want to promote and encourage," explained Professor Lyneir Richardson of Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED), speaking with TNS Associate Podcast Producer Kiran Oliver on the new episode of The New Stack Makers podcast.

CUEED aims to help minority tech entrepreneurs access resources such as capital, meeting spaces, business advice, and offers instruction on how to apply to a technology accelerator program or a government-funded grant for seed capital.

Full Article
Podcast



NorthJersey.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, January 23, 2017

NorthJersey.com

One hundred years ago, the Hahne & Co. department store on Broad Street was the pride of Newark, a retail palace ranked among the most elegant shopping emporiums in America.

Monday, after decades in which the store was empty and abandoned, the pride was back.

The Hahne & Co. building was rechristened as Newark's showplace with a ceremony marking the reopening of the site as a residential, retail and educational complex.

"It's a moment to remember the potential of Newark and Newarkers," said Nancy Cantor, chancellor of Rutgers University-Newark, which has moved its arts and cultural center into the building, as well as its campus bookstore, which will be operated by Barnes & Noble.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Monday, January 23, 2017

Asbury Park Press

President Donald Trump's moves on Monday to steer the nation on a more isolationist path could generate more jobs, but it also could lead to trade wars, cede world leadership to China, and spark higher consumer prices, experts said.

It prompted one New Jersey leader to worry that the debate about the merits of free trade distracts from a more pressing issue: training students and displaced workers for jobs that will pay a living wage and rebuild the middle class.

"It's really missing the point," said Farrokh Langdana, a finance and economics professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark. "We need to retrain the job force."

Full Article



Fountain Valley, CA
Sunday, January 22, 2017

Editor&Publisher

Newspaper media companies continue to have a brand crisis on their hands and seem to either be oblivious to the problem or lack the will to do something about it. The problem has many roots—most notably (and regrettably) the media's (including newspapers) totally one-sided coverage of their own industry. How many articles about newspaper layoffs, circulation declines, ownership changes and financial woes have you read? How many articles about the growth and local dominance of newspaper media companies in the digital environment? As an industry, newspapers fail to celebrate their successes and fixate on the negatives. And that is what gets public attention.

I've written elsewhere about the misperception of newspapers as the proverbial dinosaur of media. Doomed to extinction. Well, newspapers are indeed emulating the dinosaur in remarkable and innovative ways—because dinosaurs are not extinct. They've simply adapted. We are surrounded daily by dinosaurs, we just don't recognize them. Their modern-day descendants thrive today as perhaps the most prolific and adaptive (10,000+ species) land vertebrate on earth—birds!

Bob Provost
Distinguished Executive-In Residence

Rutgers Business School

Full Article



Washington D.C.
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The B-STAR program helps Rutgers Business School fulfill its commitment to excellence in diversity and inclusion. Our B-STAR students are a highly diverse group: all are minorities who are traditionally underrepresented in the business school, 60 percent are multilingual, and 42 percent are low-income. More than half of B-STAR students are first in their family to go to college. By living and learning in such a diverse group, students see the value of different perspectives for business excellence.

Read the entire blog:



Shanghai
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The Chinese are not thrilled about their entanglement with the U.S. economy, any more than Donald Trump is, but like a quarreling couple, the two nations have kept dancing together out of mutual self-interest, according to a U.S. expert. Farok Contractor, a distinguished professor at Rutgers Business School, made the remarks in an article posted on his website.

According to Professor Contractor’s research, adding up the numbers for exports as well as foreign direct investment (FDI) between China and the U.S., the maximum number of jobs created by such activities in China is between 17.79 and 17.99 million, while the number in the US is about 1.6 million. Besides jobs, other consequences of the two nations’ intertwined economy are also too important to be neglected.

Professor Contractor's blog was also republished by the Xinhua News Agency

Read the entire piece



NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, January 17, 2017

NJBIZ

By Lyneir Richardson, executive director, The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Rutgers Business School.

Technology accelerators provide entrepreneurs with access to seed capital, business relationships, guidance and office space. Over the last 18 months, three accelerators have opened in Newark with great fanfare. The investors and corporations that have funded these accelerators have been praised for being committed to Newark's revitalization.

The individuals behind the accelerators have expressed their understanding of the importance of racial and gender diversity among the entrepreneurs with whom they'll be teaming. Tom Wisniewski, who is the managing director of venture capital fund Newark Venture Partners, said that his firm will "look to support a diverse set" of entrepreneurs, "including women and minorities."

While there's talk of diversity, the truth is that less than 5 percent of the teams that are admitted into Newark's accelerator programs are led by a Black or Latino owner. Many have approached the accelerators with tech venture ideas, but they've often been denied or deferred for a variety of reasons.

I've been contacted by well-educated and talented minority startup owners whose businesses offer valuable solutions for the ed tech, defense, and other large national markets. Unfortunately, their growth and revenue potential are severely constricted because of their inability to attain seed capital and early stage support from investors.

I believe that part of the reason why Black and Latino teams haven't been given a proper shot is due to unconscious bias in the accelerators' and investors' selection process. To remedy this challenge, here are four suggestions that would help accelerators in Newark (and beyond) to offers opportunities to Black and Latino entrepreneurs who are seeking to build promising technology companies:

1. Focus on inclusion in the selection/admission process
2. Add Black and Latino investors
3. Leverage minority-targeted events to foster outreach
4. Consider the local benefits that a $50M company can deliver

Full Article



Black Press USA
Newark, NJ
Monday, January 16, 2017

Black Press USA

Despite a plethora of economic and social challenges, African-Americans remain among the most optimistic consumer groups in the nation's economy.

A recent report by the market research firm, Packaged Facts, revealed that nearly half (47 percent) of African-Americans believe they will be better off financially 12 months from now.

"I work with African-American entrepreneurs each day who believe that they can create opportunity and generate profit. Words like hustle, ingenuity, faith, and luck almost always trump fear and pessimism," said Lyneir Richardson, the director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, a research and practitioner-oriented center at Rutgers Business School in Newark, New Jersey.

Full Article



News 12

 

Atlantic City, NJ
Thursday, January 12, 2017

News 12

Internet gambling has helped Atlantic City's casinos post their first revenue increase in a decade.

Figures released Thursday by state gambling regulators show the casinos earned $2.6 billion from gamblers in 2016, an increase of 1.5 percent from a year earlier.

The last time Atlantic City casino revenue increased was in 2006, just as a wave of Pennsylvania casinos began opening and drawing away Atlantic City's customers.

Internet gambling revenue in New Jersey rose by more than 32 percent last year, to nearly $197 million.

Rutgers Business School economics professor Arthur Guarino says this could be the start of a lot more gambling in a lot of different areas.

"I think the casinos are going to diversify as far as the services they offer, and I think online gambling is just going to be one of them," Guarino says.

Guarino also expects betting on professional sports, and college sports in the long term.

Full Article and Video



Digital Journal
Newark, NJ
Thursday, January 12, 2017

Ivy Exec

The Wharton MBA for Executives (Philadelphia) and Columbia Business School Executive MBA Program take the top spots on Ivy Exec's 2017 Best Executive MBA Programs – US Northeast ranking. This is Ivy Exec Inc.'s second annual EMBA ranking, but the first year the company is unveiling the results regionally. These rankings are based on a quantitative survey-based perception study Ivy Exec undertook with the help of its professional community of high-achieving, high-aspiring executives.

The top ten Executive MBA Programs in the US Northeast are:

1.    The Wharton MBA for Executives (Philadelphia)
2.    Columbia Business School Executive MBA Program
3.    MIT Executive MBA Program
4.    The Yale MBA for Executives
5.    NYU Stern Executive MBA Program
6.    Cornell Executive MBA Metro New York
7.    The Rutgers Executive MBA Program
8.    Boston University EMBA
9.    The Fordham Executive MBA
10.   St. Joseph's Executive MBA One-Year Program

"Most EMBA rankings use ranking techniques that are really extensions of those used for ranking traditional MBA and part-time MBA programs," offers Farrokh Langdana, Director of the Rutgers Executive MBA Program. "Ivy Exec has really broken free from this pack by emphasizing that Executive MBA rankings are in a whole separate category of their own."

Digital Journal article

Ivy Exec's 2017 Best Executive MBA Programs – US Northeast ranking

Rutgers Executive MBA highlights



AXESS
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, January 3, 2017

AXESS

Shared office spaces are revolutionizing the way we work, transforming buildings into social networks.

Maybe it's the free cups of cold-brew coffee. Or the organic snacks. Or the communal kitchen. Or the lazy hammocks lounging in the low light of the quiet room.

From the minute you walk into WeWork and are greeted by the serious-smiling receptionist at the front desk, it's apparent that this is far more than a shared working space.

It's a community where freelancers, entrepreneurs, artists, writers, small businesses, and startups trade ideas, make connections, socialize, share lunch, and yes, even work together.

The collegial atmosphere is no accident. When Adam Neumann, who grew up on a kibbutz in Israel, and Miguel McKelvey, who was raised on a collective in Oregon, opened their first WeWork in New York City in 2010, they targeted the so-called We Generation, putting the We before the Work.

Joe Markert, an assistant professor in marketing at Rutgers Business School, says the influence of co-working, which syncs with ride-sharing in our e-commerce, smartphone-savvy world, goes far beyond the shared space.

"The traditional office has to be more flexible," he says. "Even large companies are renting their excess space out to short-term customers."

And some of them, he adds, are finding it profitable and even rejuvenating to rent spaces from innovative companies like WeWork.

Full Article



Asbury, NJ
Friday, December 30, 2016

Asbury Park Press

If the campaign and weeks after the election are a sign, Trump will usher in a noisy era in which a spontaneous Tweet can send stocks rising or falling. It marks a new challenge for investors trying to figure out where to place their money.

It has left them trying to discern bluster and show business from economics and policy.

Financial advisers continue to urge their clients to stick with their long-term plan. Have a diversified portfolio that is in line with your tolerance for risk. Don't try to guess when the market will rise or fall. And don't panic during big sell-offs, particularly if you have 20 or 30 years before you need the money.

"For a Main Street investor you can't respond to the gyrations of the market," said John Longo, a professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School. "You're never going to be as quick as the experts. You've got to go back to the basics."

Full Article



Irvine, Calif.
Thursday, December 29, 2016

Now that the holidays are over and the new year is in full swing, it’s time to head back to the lab to formulate fresh, smart, and effective ideas that will grow your organization. Whatever the size of your firm, whether you’re B2B or B2C, and regardless of the industry in which you operate, here are four must do’s that Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Unban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School, says you need to launch if you’re aiming to increase profits and market share over the next 365 days:

Read the full article: