In the Media

Top MBA
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Top MBA

In addition to providing MBAs with experience in the pharmaceutical and life sciences industries, an internship at Bayer is designed to allow MBAs to apply their innovation skills to making a difference in patients' lives.

Suraj Adiecha is a Rutgers MBA student who decided to intern at Bayer after visiting the company for a presentation and learning that the company's values aligned with his own. In this interview, Adiecha discusses his experience interning with Bayer, including how building relationships helps get things done within the organization.

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NJ Spotlight
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, November 8, 2016

NJ Spotlight

Business incubators, venture capital, labs and tools, and entrepreneurial expertise are fast becoming available across the Garden State.

A number of New Jersey universities are seeing it as part of their role to encourage business incubation.

New Jersey's future economic vitality is linked to entrepreneurial innovation, coordinating and leveraging resources, noted Michele Siekerka, president and CEO of the New Jersey Business and Industry Association, at its recent Innovation Summit at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

"New Jersey was the Innovation State. New Jersey is the Innovation State," she said. "Collaboration between industry, academia, and government is essential."

Rutgers Business School is part of Newark Venture Partners, which will soon take applications to fund a second round of companies.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Thursday, November 3, 2016

NJBIZ

The event recognized four CEOs as top innovators and leaders in their industry:

  • Adenah Bayoh, founder and CEO of Adenah Bayoh and Companies
  • Kevin Cummings, CEO and president of Investors Bank
  • Paul Hoffman, CEO and president of Liberty Science Center
  • Gene Muller, founder and CEO of Flying Fish Brewing

The award presentations were followed by a panel discussion involving this year's honorees and moderator Edward Horton, partner at Citrin Cooperman.

During the panel, Cummings discussed how great opportunities can sometimes come from disappointments, which is how he came to find himself in his current position. According to Cummings, his displeasure with his former job as a CPA motivated him to take a position as chief operating officer at Investors Bank.

"I took a situation that was a negative and turned it into a great opportunity," he said.

Bayoh's journey, escaping from the Liberian Civil War at age 13, has also influenced her business practices and her determination.

"I was able to feel the opportunity and really feel that this country is special in the sense that, if you have the will and passion to really do something, the possibilities are there," she said. "So, I really took advantage of the opportunity and didn't miss any school from the seventh grade to college, because I understood the importance of education."

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Boston, MA
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

As Jerome Williams, marketing professor and provost of Rutgers University-Newark, told The Christian Science Monitor in a phone interview, the original purpose of targeted advertising was not to “exclude other groups” but to “concentrate your message to a particular group.”

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Yale Global
Newark, NJ
Thursday, October 27, 2016

Yale Global

Trade – along with the accompanying fears over foreign competition, job loss and reduced wages – is a hot issue for the US presidential campaign and elections elsewhere. Ajai Gaur and Ram Mudambi, professors of international business strategy at Rutgers Business School and Temple University, analyze four fallacies associated with trade, globalization and manufacturing in advanced economies.

Manufacturing jobs are no longer the basis of US prosperity. "Most advanced economies have become primarily service economies," they explain. "Rich countries are service economies, focused on finance, engineering, design and health care, and this is dictated by their comparative advantage."

Also, imports do not make a country poor, and the most competitive companies both import and export to attract foreign investment and capital. Foreign firms can provide immense benefits for the economies of other nations, and the global supply chain allows domestic firms to become exporters by proxy without the risks of international activity.

Gaur and Mudambi urge politicians to reject the fallacies and citizens to make informed decisions before voting.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Monday, October 24, 2016

NJBIZ

The economic downturn of 2008 - or what was known as the financial meltdown on Wall Street - spurred a lot of change in the financial services industry as it grappled with why it happened and how to prevent it from ever happening again.

Here's one thing you may not have thought of: More diversity in key leadership roles could have changed the course of events.

At least, that's what David Wilcox said at a recent conference on improving diversity in the financial sector at Rutgers University-Newark.

"One has to wonder what the financial world would have looked like during the financial crisis if the decision-makers - both in government and in the private sector - would have been more diverse," said Wilcox, director of research and statistics of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors.

"Economics is a tricky business, and even very smart people get it wrong. Our commitment is: Diverse teams include an atmosphere where it's ... encouraged to speak up and say, 'Have you thought about X?' and it is not seen as an act of challenging (a senior official)."

Panelists also discussed the business argument for diversity, and why there are still so few minorities and women in the executive suite.

Nancy DiTomaso, a distinguished professor at Rutgers Business School, said organizations that are only focused on reducing discrimination or focused on implicit bias will not be successful in the diversity space.

Some panelists also pointed out that there are many executives who will say the right things to the press or on surveys - that they want more women and minorities - but take no action to do so.

DiTomaso also pointed out that there is no such thing as a diverse person, and by talking about individuals or groups of ethnically different people, it makes white men the normative group.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, October 24, 2016

The Daily Targum

Two years ago, a high school senior read a newsletter which inspired her to begin competing in pageants. Now, she wears the crown and sash of Miss New Jersey USA 2017.

It took Chhavi Verg three pageants to achieve her dream of winning the title, though she had been dreaming of it since she was a junior or senior in high school.

"If I can do this, anyone else can," she said. "It's all about determination, grit and never losing faith in yourself."

The Rutgers Business School sophomore studying marketing and finance decided to enter the competition because she was already involved with modeling, and competed in Miss New Jersey Teen USA 2015. She said winning was important to her mainly because she saw it as a way to empower, lead and inspire others.

"I always felt that competing in pageants gave you a lot of exposure," she said. "Winning would give you a voice to bring about change because of the following you'd have as a result of being a titleholder."

Verg attributes her victory to preparation.

"There is a quote I learned in one of my classes at Rutgers Business School: the five P's are Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance. So there were many layers to preparing," she said.

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YAHOO! Finance
New York, NY
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

YAHOO Finance

New research from Columbia Business School helps explain the low number of corporate whistle-blowers: company stock options are often given to rank-and-file employees to discourage them from publicly reporting financial reporting violations. Although the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 offers financial rewards to encourage whistle-blowing, the research shows that firms are giving employees far superior incentives to remain quiet about financial irregularities.

The study, Rank and File Employees and the Discovery of Misreporting: The Role of Stock Options, is coauthored by Rajgopal, Andrew C. Call of Arizona State University, and Simi Kedia of Rutgers Business School. The authors obtained information for the research from Stanford Securities Class Action Clearinghouse data to identify firms alleged to have engaged in financial misreporting and find class action lawsuits filed for the period 1996 to 2011.

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NorthJersey.com
Woodland Park
Thursday, October 13, 2016

Although Hindus as a whole identify with the Democratic Party over the Republican Party by an overwhelming 48 point margin, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, Indian business leaders like Kumar fit logically into the GOP camp, said Farrokh Langdana, professor of finance and economics at the Rutgers Business School. "They want low taxes, low government regulations," he said. "That model appeals to them."

In this case, however, Kumar’s trust in Trump is misplaced, Langdana said. "The man is against trade," he said of Trump. "He’s openly said the way he’s going to create jobs is through tariffs."

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Westfield, N.J.
Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Steve Forbes highlighted some of the greatest business leaders of his generation in hopes of inspiring the next generation in a speech given at the State Theatre New Jersey in partnership with the Rutgers Business School on Sept. 25. The business school event that attracted close to 900 attendees from both the university and the surrounding community was part of an ongoing celebration of Rutgers' 250th anniversary.

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BusinessWire
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, October 11, 2016

BusinessWire

A new academic study by professors from four esteemed universities applied News Quantified’s unique data to conclude that, when crucial financial news is released during extended stock market hours, returns are positively and appreciably associated with subsequent main trading session returns.

The research was conducted by Dr. Shari Levi, assistant accounting professor at the Tel Aviv University School of Management; Dr. Joshua Livnat, professor emeritus of accounting at New York University’s Stern School of Business and managing director at Quantitative Management Associates; Dr. Li Zhang, assistant accounting professor at Rutgers Business School; and Dr. Xiao-Jun Zhang, professor of accounting at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley.

Dr. Livnat notes, "The data supplied to us by News Quantified reduced data collection efforts immensely, and enabled us to perform rigorous tests of how extended market trading incorporates new information into prices, and how these market reactions can predict future returns.

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Asbury, NJ
Monday, October 10, 2016

Asbury Park Press

Taxes managed to break through the noise of the campaign during Sunday's debate, when a voter asked the candidates what provisions they would support to ensure the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share.

It highlighted one of the biggest policy differences between the two candidates. Donald J. Trump wants to lower the highest tax rate.  Hillary Clinton wants to raise it.

The Asbury Park Press looked at the two presidential candidates' tax plans to see how they would impact New Jersey taxpayers. If they vote next month solely in their own financial interest, both candidates can make a case to win them over.

"It's easy to reduce burdens on anyone," said Jay Soled, a professor of accounting and information systems at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick. "The harder question is unless you want to run the deficit up, what spending cuts are you going to make?"

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New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, October 6, 2016

MasterThesisWriting.com

Have you been thinking about earning an MBA in marketing? First, you need to choose the right provider. Consider online learning as an alternative to attending classes in person. Online learning gives you access to programs you can not get locally which may be higher in quality or more prestigious. The cost of online learning is usually much less expensive, possibly placing an otherwise out of reach program within your grasp. Here is our list of the 7 best online courses for pursuing your MBA in marketing.

Rutgers Business School Newark and New Brunswick
Rutgers unique offering, a mini MBA in digital marketing, is a great way to update your marketing skill set in today's fast paced technology environment. The 10 module program is taught by industry professionals and includes case studies, exercises and interactive projects. The course can be completed in 12 weeks.

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YAHOO! Finance
Newark and New Brunswick, NJ
Tuesday, October 4, 2016

YAHOO Finance

If you automatically reach for a $39.99 sweater or load up on $11.99 albums on iTunes, you’re not alone. The strategy of ending prices with 99 cents has worked its magic on all of us.

Merchants use a variety of strategies to get us to spend more — from labeling prices without dollar signs to setting a per-customer limit. These practices are used with all kinds of products, including clothes, food, toys, cars and houses.

Known as "charm prices," tags that end in "9," "99" or "95" make items appear cheaper than they really are. Since people read from left to right, they are more likely to register the first number and make an immediate conclusion as to whether the price is reasonable.

When Professor Robert Schindler of the Rutgers Business School studied prices at a women's clothing store, he found the 1 cent difference between prices ending in ".99" and ".00" had "a considerable effect on sales," with prices ending with ".99" far outselling those ending with ".00."

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All Africa
Washinton, DC
Tuesday, October 4, 2016

All Africa

Former Gov. Jim Florio and Rutgers faculty hosted a delegation of Namibian executives to identify mutual research solutions in energy, infrastructure, agriculture and finance.

John McLaughlin of the McLaughlin Global Network facilitated the Sept. 19 visit with the Rutgers' Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs and Rutgers Business School.

Kevin Lyons, a faculty member in Rutgers Business School, presented a supply chain model designed to mitigate risk and help direct cost-efficient operations.

"I found the model very interesting -- how do we fix the problem with technology?" Foibe Namene, the CEO of the Electricity Control Board, Namibia's energy regulator said.

"How do we ensure that the money spent is spent properly instead of exporting capital out?"

Bisey Uirab, the CEO of the Namibian Port Authority, said that he is interested in understanding more about port operations in New Jersey's complex infrastructure network to expand import and export capacity in Namibia.

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Salon
New York, NY
Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Salon.com

As the World Bank and IMF convene this week in Washington for their annual meeting, there is growing evidence that the post-World War II global consensus that created them is unraveling, right at the time when the world economy is facing major economic headwinds decades in the making.

This great uncoupling, comes as global economic growth and trade numbers continue to disappoint and central bankers in Europe, Japan and the United States have run out of ideas of how to restore their economies to the pre-2008 meltdown expansion rates. Now, they fret over a global recession mired in trillions of dollars in public and private debt.

"In 2016 many central banks have driven interest rates to near zero or even negative values.  This has produced only a small discernible stimulus," Farok Contractor, distinguished professor of Management and Global Business, Rutgers Business School, told Salon. "This is an unhealthy situation on two counts. First, historically low interest rates have created asset bubbles around the world in real estate, stocks, and bonds. Worse, central banks now have little or no room for further maneuvers in monetary policy, should future crises arise requiring further stimulus."

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YAHOO! Finance
Lewisville, TX
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

YAHOO Finance

Teladoc, Inc. (TDOC), the nation's leading provider of telehealth services, today announced that Mark Hirschhorn has been appointed to the newly created role of chief operating officer, while continuing to serve as the company's chief financial officer.

"I'm exceptionally proud of the company we've built and am incredibly energized to partner with Jason, and the leadership team, to help lead our next phase of corporate growth, winning the hearts and minds of our members and extensive client base," said Mark Hirschhorn, Teladoc COO and CFO.

Mr. Hirschhorn received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Rutgers University in 1986 and a Master of Business Administration degree from Rutgers Business School in 1987. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

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Alumni MBA


Orlando, FL
Monday, September 26, 2016

University of Central Florida

I spent most of the week at Rutgers Business School attending a conference on the future of graduate business education.  Usually I consider attending a conference a "win" if I leave feeling affirmed about what we are doing along with one good idea I can steal.  I left this conference feeling affirmed with three good ideas I could steal.  No doubt my team will be thrilled with today's "to do" list.

No doubt the most affirming moment came when a corporate executive said: "Every student needs a course in failure.  It should include how to recover from mistakes, especially how to fire people."

And so, I'm issuing an RFP to anyone on our faculty interested in developing an undergraduate or graduate course on failure.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Monday, September 26, 2016

The Daily Targum

Everyone fails, but not everyone can learn from mistakes and go on to succeed.

That was just one of the lessons Forbes Magazine Editor-in-Chief Steve Forbes presented Sunday at the State Theatre at Rutgers Business School's "Coming Home: Honoring our Heroes and Heritage" event.

"What is the fundamental difference between people today and people from the Stone Age? Same human bodies, same appetites, same resources. The difference between us and (ancient civilizations) is we know more," he said. "It's very basic, we have more knowledge . . . as long as knowledge is not destroyed, we can come back and we can move ahead."

Utilizing that knowledge properly is important to success, he said. Steve Jobs failed numerous times and was even fired from the company he founded. He was able to learn from his mistakes and became a famous leader after returning to the company a few years later.

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New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, September 22, 2016

The Daily Targum

The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development offers classes at Rutgers Business School to help craft makers establish an Etsy shop to sell their products, according to the Rutgers Business School website.

Etsy is an online store where you can buy and sell handmade and vintage items. There is a unique variety of items that include jewelry, bath and beauty products, to name a few.

"The program started by Etsy, they develop the curriculum and they find an Etsy seller who lives in the area and have them teach the course," said Becky Garcia, the instructor of the Rutgers class.

Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship Workshop

Etsy often partners with libraries and community centers to set up this workshop for crafters, she said.

Garcia has been selling items on Etsy since 2010, and her shop has taken off since. She got her bachelor's degree from Yale University in American Art and Material Culture, and a master’s degree in American Material Culture.

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