Donald McCabe

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College test manuals make cheating easier

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Textbook manuals offering "test banks'' of questions are a new frontier in college cheating, professors say. Donald McCabe, a business professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey who studies college cheating, said the UCF case is ambiguous since students might not have known the exact questions would be on their exam.

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Is rise in cheating due to technology or values?

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

About 200 students admitted their involvement, but some have questioned whether the incident was actually cheating. Donald McCabe, founding president of the International Center for Academic Integrity, told Inside Higher Ed that surveys show far more faculty say there is cheating than students, suggesting shifting norms about the issue. “What we called cheating 20 years ago isn’t called cheating...

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Cheating and the Generational Divide

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

In regards to shared responsibility, shifting norms, and such finger-pointing back and forth when cheating serves no purpose, said Fishman and Donald McCabe, founding president of the International Center for Academic Integrity and a professor of management and global business at Rutgers University at Newark. "I think this really suggests there’s an onus on us to understand that there are these...

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UW-Madison students, faculty struggle with plagiarism in Internet era

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

When UW-Madison chemistry lecturer Jeanine Batterton accused 42 students last fall of plagiarism on a written lab assignment in Chem 104, she was floored by the range of "bizarre excuses" offered by the undergraduates. Donald McCabe, professor at Rutgers University and co-founder of the International Center for Academic Integrity, has been researching academic misconduct for 20 years and he says...

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Graduating with Class

Friday, September 3, 2010

What makes a good person makes for a good worker. But teaching those values is tricky. How does one lead a class in being honest? Coastal Carolina University has handed this tough job to Michael Pierce, a biology professor who takes on the newly created mantle of academic integrity officer. Pierce takes on the challenge as schools across the nation struggle with the same problem. Surveys...

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Ex-Pocantico superintendent accused of plagiarism gets doctorate revoked

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Donald McCabe, a business professor at Rutgers University and co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University, said that there were some examples of teachers or administrators caught plagiarizing but not many. "It seems to me that when teachers or administrators get themselves in trouble like this — particularly administrators, higher-level administrators — it's swept under...

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MBA Program Withdraws From China Due to "Widespread Plagiarism," Other Issues

Monday, July 26, 2010

A small New Jersey college has decided to close its China MBA program after finding evidence that students there engaged in rampant cheating. Centenary College, a Hackettstown-NJ-based institution, ended its MBA program for Chinese-speaking students after finding "evidence of widespread plagiarism," the school said in a statement posted on its website today. Donald McCabe, founder of the Center...

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Poor Work Ethics Risk Future of U.S. Business, Education and Ultimately Freedom

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

In 2005, Professor Donald McCabe at Rutgers Business School published a survey where more than 70% of students admitted to cheating at least once on a test. Cheating is not just reserved for high school students. McCabe also surveyed graduate students and discovered cheating attitudes for: 56% of business students, 54% of engineering students, 48% of education students, and 45% of law school...

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Students' cheating takes a high-tech turn

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Professor Donald McCabe, at Rutgers Business School in New Jersey, has conducted much of the research on cheating in U.S. schools since 1990 and says cheating on tests in high school is on the rise. In his survey of 24,000 students at 70 high schools, 64 percent of students admitted to cheating on a test, 58 percent admitted to plagiarism and 95 percent said they participated in some form of...

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Legalized 'Cheating?'

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Indeed, despite a nationwide crackdown on everything from camera phones to drugs that help students' test performances, three in four high-school students still admit to cheating. The number admitting to plagiarizing from the Internet in particular quadrupled between 1999 and 2005, according to studies by Donald McCabe, a professor at Rutgers Business School.

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Tech seeks to learn from integrity survey

Thursday, April 15, 2010

In conjunction with the Center for Academic Integrity, Texas Tech and other universities around the world are participating in the Academic Integrity Matters survey. Donald McCabe, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers University and the founding president of the Center for Academic Integrity, said he plays a large role in administering the survey and Tech is one of more than...

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Report on academic honesty at FGCU could lead to changes

Thursday, February 18, 2010

For some students, the line between cheating and getting a little help can be fuzzy. It is not uncommon, says Donald McCabe, a professor at Rutgers Business School in New Jersey, who has spent 20 years studying academic dishonesty.

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Cheating: You Have To Sweat The Small Stuff

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Cheating is widespread in our culture. Research conducted by Donald McCabe, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School, shows that more than 70% of students across all types of education institutions report that they engage in some form of cheating. HireRight, a company that does background checks, estimates that 80% of all résumés are misleading.

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Can cheating in school predict white collar crime?

Friday, January 29, 2010

Even though colleges and universities have standards for academic integrity and fairness, do today's students even believe in an honor code? We're talking about cheating on tests, plagiarizing, fabrication of facts, aiding/abetting, falsification of records, and gaining unauthorized access to materials. Donald McCabe of Rutgers University (as reported by U.S.News & World Report) stated that...

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The Poor Work Ethics Risk Future U.S. economy, education, and ultimately freedom

Thursday, January 28, 2010

In 2005, Donald McCabe of Rutgers University published a survey that more than 70% of students cheat at least once admitted to an examination. Cheating is not reserved only for altitudes students. McCabe also surveyed students and found fraud settings: 56% of business students, 54% of engineering students,  48% of the training of students and 45% of Law School Students.

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Frivolous privacy concerns

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

In 2006, a study found that 56 per cent of graduate business students admitted to cheating in the previous year, compared with 47 per cent of non-business students. Donald McCabe, lead researcher on the study and business strategy who is also a professor at Rutgers said, "Those numbers are probably under-reported. Since the survey was voluntary, more dishonest students were less likely to fill...

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Holding the Line: It's time to confront our cheating culture and begin leading with our values

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

By certain indicators, cheating is widespread in our culture. In research by Donald McCabe, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School, more than 70 percent of students across all types of education report that they engage in some form of cheating. (Newsletter by www.handsorganization.org) 

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Graduate Schools Win Chinese Protection Against Test Cheaters

Monday, December 7, 2009

A Chinese court barred a Beijing- based Internet site from selling materials such as questions from the Graduate Management Admission Test, bolstering business schools’ efforts to combat cheating by applicants. The Chinese court ruling “will scare some people from cheating in the short term now that they realize they could be affected by this and have their GMAT score canceled,” said Donald...

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University puts cheats to shame

Sunday, November 22, 2009

Although there are few statistics available to gauge the extent of the problem, a study last year by Dr. Donald McCabe, a professor at Rutgers University in the US, found that, out of 2,600 students at Zayed University, many admitted to cheating and felt able to justify it.

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