In the News

Harvard Business Review
Harvard Business Review
Upon joining a group, extroverts are perceived as having high status. But in an online experiment involving imagined scenarios, extroverts’ perceived status slipped from 4.37 to 3.87 on a 7-point scale as the group came to consider their assertiveness and talkativeness less valuable and to suspect that they were motivated by self-interest, say Corinne Bendersky of UCLA and Neha Parikh Shah of Rutgers. To retain their status, extroverts must contribute at especially high levels to counter growing negative perceptions of them, the researchers say.
Poets & Quants
Poets & Quants
For the second year in a row, The Financial Times has added top-25 lists of business schools in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific region to go with its annual ranking of European schools.

Rutgers Business School made the list at No. 24: FT has ranked the Rutgers MBA as only No. 89, but its open executive education offering is ranked much higher.
FOX 47
FOX 47
If you’re a parent, odds are you’ve heard it before.
When one of your kids gets something from you, whether it be money or items, your other child immediately wants to know “Where’s Mine?”. This prompts the question: As parents, do we always treat our kids equally?

Rutgers University Marketing Professor Kristina Durante and her colleagues tested that question.
“We were having parents enter a lottery to win a treasury bond worth $25. And they had to tell us with a name which of their children they would give the treasury bond to.” Said Durante.
The parents could only enter once and had to choose between their girl or their boy for the potential winnings. Moms chose daughters. Dads chose their sons.
“It suggests that we do play favorites, even if we don’t think that we do.” Said Durante.
Minuteman Press
Minuteman Press
"When I opened my business I quickly realized how many things I didn’t know about being an entrepreneur. As a business owner, you really are responsible for everything. I was working longer and longer hours without seeing growth in my business. I wanted to be in charge of my own success. The Rutgers Business School Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUEED), and its Entrepreneurship Pioneers Initiative (EPI) gave me the tools to sustain and grow my business," Holly Kaplansky.

Owner Holly Kaplansky provides a video on her perspective of running a business and how CUEED helped.
Psychology Today
Psychology Today
Upcoming events may alter the way we think about and use the preceding time.

To help push back on this tendency, lead author and Rutgers University marketing researcher Gabriela Tonietto recommends “any strategy you can think of to minimize the number of boundaries that you’re creating” in your schedule–for example, planning back-to-back meetings in the morning while keeping the afternoon open. Separating longer tasks into smaller subtasks might also help, she says. “The reluctance to even get started contributes the biggest part of this effect.”
Financial Times
Financial Times
This is the second time the FT has ranked the top schools in the Americas and Asia-Pacific. These top-25 tables reflect both the quality and breadth of business schools offerings. The FT measured performance in the main 2018 rankings: MBA, executive MBA, Masters in Management (MiM) and the two rankings for executive education. The tables use the same methodology as for Europe; the exception is that placings for the Americas do not include the MiM as too few schools participate.

The FT’s ranking of the top 25 schools in the Americas — based on their performance in other FT rankings — reflects how the market is changing and also how it is not.

Rutgers Business School in New Jersey is an example of how this can affect a ranking position. Its full-time MBA is number 89 in the FT global ranking, but the school makes it on to the Americas list because of its executive education offering.
TAPinto.net
TAPinto.net
The Morris County Economic Development Corporation, a division of The Morris County Chamber of Commerce held the First Annual Innovation and Sustainability Forum with a focus on the Impact of Corporate Social Innovation. An informative and interactive panel on health and wellness, community engagement and environmental sustainability was followed by networking, lunch and a keynote address from Executive Vice President of Global Health and President of the BD Foundation ( Becton Dickinson and Co.) Gary M. Cohen.

The panel moderator was Jeana Wirtenberg, PH. D, Associate Professor for Professional Practice in the Management and Global Business Department, Rutgers Business School. She leads the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative for the Business School and is Associate Director of the new Rutgers Institute for Corporate Social Innovation (RICSI).
Nature
Nature
The state can benefit from applying artificial intelligence to its data, says Jaideep Vaidya, a computer scientist at Rutgers Business School in Newark, New Jersey. He is developing data-analysis software for Newark that will help to make decisions on the basis of citizen complaints.

Newark — a densely populated city with a poverty rate of almost 30% — has a large number of vacant plots, which do not generate property tax and sometimes attract crime. Vaidya says that predictive analytics can make computer models of different actions or incentives that might entice businesses to take over those plots. Officials can also use predictive analytics to work out the best way to bring in revenue, “which in turn lets you lower the tax burden”, he says.
Ghent University
Ghent University
Prof. dr. Glenn Shafer (Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick, USA): 'Did Blaise Pascal and Christiaan Huygens provide a game-theoretic foundation for probability?'

Abstract: The originality of Pascal's, Fermat's, and Huygens's work on mathematical probability in the 1650s is often exaggerated. Fermat's method of dividing stakes, which counted equally likely cases, had already been part of Europe's learned tradition for centuries. The game-theoretic foundations provided by Pascal and Huygens had their own antecedents in the tradition of commercial arithmetic. The success of Pascal's and Huygens's foundations for Fermat's methods can be seen as a merger of the learned and commercial traditions, set against the backdrop of the larger merger represented by the 17th century's use of algebra to reconstruct the mathematics of the ancients. This success is renewed by the modern game-theoretic foundation for probability, which supports modern measure-theoretic methods just as Pascal's and Huygens's foundations supported Fermat's methods.
Metro MBA - Your metro, your MBA
Metro MBA - Your metro, your MBA
Supply chain management delves into business at the big-picture level. It puts all the operations together to ensure that everything functions smoothly. It’s the ideal position for individuals who are interested in managing people, organizing moving parts, and analyzing global trends.
We’ve outlined our top seven picks for MBA programs in supply management.

#4 Rutgers Business School is home to a full-time MBA concentration in Supply Chain Management. Students who choose this path are 100 percent employed three months after graduation thanks to the fact that they graduated from the 11th ranked school according to the U.S. News & World Report. The concentration prepares students to handle everything from logistics to supply chain management, procurement, sourcing, and more. Best yet, students can choose from over 40 supply chain management courses to complete their degree.
In addition, Rutgers offers the Center for Supply Chain Management for educational and research opportunities. The Center provides various resources including a certificate program, a wide range of events, and cutting-edge research.
My Central Jersey
My Central Jersey
Funds were tight this summer for several members of Sigma Lambda Beta and their housemates.
"I felt like, 'We are in college, why would we need the food pantry? That’s not really for us,'" Rosado said.

Fighting that misconception is a priority for each of the food pantry’s directors. This year, Danielle Warren from Rutgers Business School is studying the stigma associated with food insecurity and ways to combat that through messaging. By studying food pantry use and attitudes at Rutgers-Newark before and after releasing new messaging about food insecurity, Warren said she will be able to determine whether the messaging is effectively reducing stigma.
Rutgers Today, Your daily source for universitywide news
Rutgers Today
Rutgers Business School's Kristina M. Durante looks at how technology and other factors have changed consumer culture.

We spoke with Kristina M. Durante, associate professor of marketing with Rutgers Business School-Newark and Brunswick whose research lies at the intersection of social psychology, evolutionary biology and consumer decision-making about how new technology and other factors have changed consumer culture.

How are holiday shopping habits changing?

Older generations are still shopping at brick and mortar stores. For some, it’s a tradition; part of your culture includes Christmas shopping at a store. But those older shoppers are fading.
Parents are younger and part of the digital generation. They want a frictionless experience. I think it’s specific to toys and kids. We want hyper-efficiency shopping for toys, but if it’s your sister or friend’s birthday, you tend to think beyond ‘What is the hot thing I can get with the click of a button.’ This is where brick and mortar may have more opportunity.
Sales & Marketing Management
Sales & Marketing Management
Over five years ago, I shared my personal presentation tips in a three-part series published in the online edition of “The Journal of Sales and Marketing Management.” Half a decade (and more) later, as the digital revolution continues its unstoppable tsunami throughout our personal and professional lives, the individual’s abilities to effectively communicate have never been more important, more self-evident, and more under siege.
As a former vice president of marketing, as a former vice president of sales, and for the past 15-plus years, as a professor of marketing, I see the need for oral as well as written communications to be severely challenged at a time when we need more effective communications in our highly fragmented and extremely challenging climate.
ROI, Return on Information New Jersey
ROI
The 4th annual CEO Evolution sponsored by Citrin Cooperman took place last week at the Newark Museum.
The panel consisted of Braun Kiess, serial entrepreneur, finance professional, educator and angel investor; Marjorie Perry, CEO of MZM Construction & Management; Biagio Scotto, president of Villa Restaurant Group; and Tom Tsivgas, owner and CEO of Yesterday’s Business Computers.

For Keiss, leadership has direct correlation with inspiration.
“Leadership to me is the ability to inspire others,” he said. “That ability to have others see your vision of the world is what really makes a great leader.”
Keiss has 13 years of experience through different industries. He has been a founder or investor in at least 12 companies including RST Automation, Pleasant Run Structures, Rainbow Direct, Partners2Market LLC, Swing Safe Inc. and Readington Hop Farm LLC.
Keiss spent two years with the Business, Engineering, Science and Technology (BEST) institute at Rutgers, is an adjunct professor of finance and entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School and a preferred instructor for the school’s executive education and executive MBA programs.
He said the most challenging part of being a leader is adaptation.
Morris Town Green
Morris Town Green
Morris County Annual Innovation and Sustainability Forum 2018
Impact of Corporate Social Innovation keynote address by Gary Cohen
Morning panel on health and wellness, philanthropy & community engagement, & environmental sustainability. Moderator Jeana Wirtenberg, Ph.D., is an associate professor of professional practice in the Management & Global Business Department at Rutgers Business School.
Forbes
Forbes
I came across an interesting piece published by Rutgers Business School

"Future of retail may be decided by supply chain analytics"
http://www.business.rutgers.edu/business-insights/future-retail-may-be-decided-supply-chain-analytics

which referenced a quote from 20 years ago by Boston Consulting Group’s Harold Sirkin warning that competition is no longer “company versus company but supply chain versus supply chain.” While the piece was focused on comparing Amazon and Walmart WMT +0.76%’s supply chain, the greater theme is relevant to every retailer. The modern-day battle now hinges on technology innovation and aptitude -- of “supply chain analytics versus supply chain analytics.”
Clear Admit
Clear Admit
A conference last month at Rutgers Business School drew top names in graduate management education to discuss how today’s digital revolution is reshaping the ways business schools teach their students—both in the classroom and beyond. Keynote speakers included deans from Stanford Graduate School of Business, Columbia Business School, the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, and Cornell SC Johnson College of Business, among others.

The Innovations in Graduate Business Education (IGBE) Conference, hosted every two years by Rutgers, drew 150 attendees for two full days of presentations around the theme “Lifelong Learning in a Digital Era.” Top administrators from Wharton, Kellogg, Kelley, Darden, MIT Sloan, and Tuck also took part as speakers and panelists in sessions focused on topics ranging from digital disruptions in educating business students to how to engage with alumni for lifelong learning.
Business News Daily, Small Business Solutions & Inspirations
Business News Daily
For small business owners, few issues matter more than the economy and regulations. While people vote for many reasons, small business owners reliably keep an eye on some major recurring issues.

"I believe small business owners are always optimistic. It's a challenging political time, but entrepreneurs are focused on generating revenue, being profitable, finding new customers and finding new markets," said Lyneir Richardson, executive director of Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.
Zero Hedge
Zero Hedge
Arthur Guarino

The Next Financial Crisis could be closer than we think. . .

While the global economy, and most certainly the U.S. economy, are enjoying a healthy and robust expansion, there are clouds on the horizon that spell trouble.

The first of these clouds is the trade war that the Trump Administration has started with China. Both nations rely heavily on each other and trade disruption will have a severe economic impact on both. The United States relies on the low-cost products imported from China which allows its consumer-based economy to thrive. China must sell products to its biggest customer, the United States, in order to be able to keep its economy growing at a healthy pace. Tariffs and trade protectionism will mean an economic slowdown for both countries and an eventual recession that neither can afford.

The other clouds come in the form of bubbles, that if a recession were to occur in the next 18 to 24 months will doom both the American and world economies.
ROI, Return on Information New Jersey
ROI
U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, talks with Rutgers Center for Real Estate's Morris Davis at the Opportunity Zone event.

For 45 minutes Monday morning, New Jersey’s junior U.S. senator held the attention of more than 200 top-level real estate professionals at the Rutgers Center for Real Estate event on the Opportunity Zone program the Democrat co-authored with a fellow senator, Tim Scott, a Republican from South Carolina.
Rutgers Today, Your daily source for universitywide news
Rutgers Today
Nancy DiTomaso has spent her career at the intersection of business and inequality, examining the ways in which race, gender, and culture create or deny job and career opportunities. Her highly lauded 2013 book, The American Non-Dilemma: Racial Inequality Without Racism (Russell Sage Foundation), addresses the ways in which inequality is reproduced – not, as many of us believe, through discrimination against minorities but through advantages afforded whites, known as “opportunity hoarding.”

DiTomaso, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick, has also turned her lens on inequality in the workforce between men and women and has come to a similar conclusion: “Discrimination for men, as well as against women,” she says, “still plays a role in the availability of job opportunities for women compared to men.”
Rutgers Today, Your daily source for universitywide news
Rutgers Today
Student food pantries help fill grocery gaps while removing stigma around food insecurity.

Fighting that misconception is a priority for each of the food pantry’s directors. This year, Danielle Warren from Rutgers Business School is studying the stigma associated with food insecurity and ways to combat that through messaging. By studying food pantry use and attitudes at Rutgers-Newark before and after releasing new messaging about food insecurity, Warren said she will be able to determine whether the messaging is effectively reducing stigma.
Rutgers - Newark
Rutgers - Newark
Rutgers University–Newark (RU-N) and Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) are on track to reach, and in some cases exceed, their Hire.Buy.Live.Newark goals unveiled more than a year ago. A major collective impact initiative, Hire.Buy.Live.Newark was created to dramatically reduce poverty and unemployment in Newark and strengthen the city's economy by 2020.

Perhaps no one embodies the Hire.Buy.Live.Newark initiative more than Yla Eason, an instructor of professional practice at Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick (RBS). Eason officially joined the Rutgers faculty in 2017 and moved to downtown Newark in 2018. She teaches two undergraduate classes, one on advertising and another on marketing for nonprofit organizations. As part of her advertising class, students have created campaigns for Forward Ever Sustainable Business Alliance, a Newark-based nonprofit, targeted at other Rutgers students to get them to sign up for a “Shop Newark” cash rewards card.

“Through frequent meetups, we are attempting to change the purchasing culture at Newark’s large institutions by introducing, and in some cases reintroducing, procurement managers to Newark suppliers of goods and services,” stated Kevin Lyons, professor of professional practice at RBS, and director of its Public-Private Community Partnership Program. The principal investigator of extensive research into the breadth and depth of Newark’s network of more than 400 manufacturers, Lyons has been working for several years with regional collaborators to improve key business functions of Newark-based manufacturers. “Significant inroads have been made in the print and paper industries. We’re making noticeable progress in food, catering, textile, and apparel.”
State Broadcast News
State Broadcast News
Developers waiting to learn about tax treatment of Opportunity Zone investments in New Jersey may get some answers on Monday when Gov. Phil Murphy is expected to join US Sen. Cory Booker on stage at an Opportunity Zones conference being sponsored by the Rutgers Center for Real Estate at the Hyatt Regency hotel here, according to Ted Zangari, chair of the real estate practice at Sills Cummis & Gross, a commercial law firm with New Jersey offices in Newark and Princeton.
WIRED
WIRED
Amazon’s new convenience store Amazon Go’s design offers shoppers an eerie freedom. Breezing out of a store without breaking stride feels efficient but also a little like shoplifting. Less perceptibly, the cameras and shelf sensors also log data that provides Amazon a remarkable view of what people do in a physical store.

The success of other companies that use technology to merge online and offline customer tracking suggests that Amazon could reap considerable benefits. Stacy Smollin Schwartz, a professor at Rutgers Business School, points to Starbucks’ popular mobile app, which uses loyalty points and personalized challenges to lure customers into stores, and Disney’s MagicBand wristbands that track visitors’ perambulations around theme parks. Both have shown that a digital lens on a person’s real-world actions can open up new ways to change their behavior.

For Amazon, that might mean sending people targeted promotions through the Amazon Go app—for example, to encourage someone who grabs a daily breakfast sandwich to also drop by for lunch. “Knowing people’s habits and being able to individually try to manipulate those habits to increase the individual loyalty and profitability of each customer is very valuable,” says Smollin Schwartz.
Irish Tech News
Irish Tech News
Auditchain is preparing to launch the MVP of the DCARPETM Explorer reporting environment and will use it to live stream the reporting of its own financial statements and internal continuous audit analytics. This will show the world what layer 2 of the Decentralized Continuous Audit & Reporting ProtocolTM “DCARPETM “ looks, feels and functions like. All data will be actualized, be presented in near real-time and not fictitious.

Which influencers and websites do you follow to keep up to date with the latest developments?

As a company, we follow the Rutgers CAR Lab and Dr. Miklos Vasarhelyi, the head of the lab along with his partner Michael Alles, each of whom are renowned experts in the field we address.
North Jersey News, part of the USA Today network
North Jersey News
The result is a dining scene that, in the words of Morris Davis, a Rutgers professor who studies the economics of real estate and housing, is “diseased.” And more problematic still, the laws are seen by local officials as holding back efforts to revitalize downtowns and attract new, often younger residents.

And to those who fear the death of BYOBs, should the law change, Rutgers professor Davis said the market should decide.

"If the marketplace wants BYOBs, restaurateurs will choose to have BYOBs. Let the marketplace decide. Let's see what happens. In every other state, there are hardly any BYOBs. Maybe BYOBs aren't that great."
Online Masters
Online Masters
Best for Government Employees

In the next few years, roughly a third of the government workforce will qualify for retirement, creating vacancies in agencies and departments at the local, state and federal levels of government. The need for qualified governmental accountants has never been greater, and a Rutgers Master of Accountancy in Governmental Accounting offers a great credential for candidates who want to fill those jobs. Rutgers Business School provides the same tuition rate for out-of-state students that it does for those who live in the state and enroll in the online Master of Accountancy in Governmental Accounting program.
Rutgers Today, Your daily source for universitywide news
Rutgers Today
Caliburn, a supercomputer with the computational power of more than 10,000 standard desktop computers, is catalyzing diverse, innovative research at Rutgers University and across New Jersey, according to the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute.

At Rutgers Business School, Gyorgy Matyasfalvi, a recent graduate of Professor Jonathan Eckstein’s group, built software tools for writing code that would be simple and readable yet run efficiently on hundreds or thousands of processors. Caliburn fulfilled an essential role in validating the research results on example problems involving planning the growth of electric power grid systems under thousands of possible demand scenarios.
New Jersey Business
New Jersey Business
Bitcoin was perhaps the hottest investment story of 2017, rising roughly 500 percent last year to a peak of more than $19,000 per coin. The digital currency’s precipitous drop in 2018 has cooled much of the speculative fervor, but it’s unlikely that the cryptocurrency is dead. Nor is it likely to replace the US dollar anytime soon, if ever, as the world’s dominant currency. The truth is likely somewhere in between.
Journal of Commerce
Journal of Commerce
Speaking at the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO’s) forum at Rutgers Business School, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rudolf Leuschner, associate professor at Rutgers University’s Department of Supply Chain Management, suggested that the added cost could prompt ocean carriers to focus on serving only two or three ports, including the largest, on the US East Coast, rather than stopping at several ports as a vessel moves along the coast.

“If I am a ship [carrier] now stopping at every major port, starting in Jacksonville, Savannah, Charleston, etc., as I make my way up to New York, ­New Jersey, I think I am going to consider skipping some of these ports if every time I am wasting miles, wasting fuel,” he said. “We are going to see a selection process where some of the more important, or bigger, ports are going to receive more traffic while the smaller ports are going to see a decrease in traffic.”
International Leadership Association
International Leadership Association
Authentic Leadership for Progress, Peace & Prosperity, the 20th anniversary global conference hosted by the International Leadership Association (ILA), will examine authentic leadership through the lens of "leadership for what" while raising issues and challenges of critical theoretical and practical importance across the spectrum of leadership.

The conference will also feature Keith Grint and Joanne Ciulla, who will each be honored with the ILA's Lifetime Achievement Award for their respective accomplishments in advancing the field of leadership. Grint is a Professor of Public Leadership at Warwick University in Coventry, England whose recent research includes work on mindfulness in high-reliability organizations. Ciulla is Professor of Leadership Ethics and Academic Director of the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers University Business School. Her book Ethics: The Heart of Leadership is a classic in the field.
PharmExec
PharmExec
Pharm Exec spoke to program leaders from three of the top universities offering MBAs with pharma/healthcare concentrations to outline the structure of their courses and to consider the question that may challenge pharma-oriented students as they pursue the MBA path—that is, to specialize or not to specialize?

Rutgers’ Pharmaceutical Management MBA program was launched in 2000, instigated by a Novartis seminar in the late 1990s that highlighted the concern that the MBAs the industry was recruiting still needed further training in pharma and healthcare. Given New Jersey’s position as “the Mecca of the US pharmaceutical industry,” it was suggested that NJ-based Rutgers develop a suitable program. “We didn’t know at first how long the program would last,” says Mahmud Hassan, PhD, the program’s director, “but quickly we were amazed with the quality of the applicants.”
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ
In the life cycle of businesses — launch, growth, and exit — the first phase is the most challenging, but it's also the most important. First, an entrepreneur has to figure out what he or she wants to do, then determine if there's a market for the venture. Of course, there's also the not-so-small matter of paying for everything.
Brian Bergen, owner of the interior landscaping company Bergen Botanicals, faced those challenges when he decided to launch a business.

“In 2013, I enrolled in the Rutgers University MBA program, and had the idea to identify an underserved market,” he noted. “Even after I later won a $20,000 first-place prize in the Rutgers 2014 Business Plan Competition, I continued to work full-time while I got the business off the ground,” he added.

Bergen’s approach meets most of the items on a virtual checklist designed by Jeffrey Robinson, academic director, The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development; and associate professor, management and global business, Rutgers Business School. “There are five things a person should consider before they start a business,” he said. “I call the process VOICE: Vision, Opportunity, Innovation, Capital and Entrepreneur’s network.”

Bloomberg BNA
Bloomberg BNA
Medtronic disagreed with the IRS’s use of the comparable profits method (CPM) for 2005 and 2006 audit years, which they argued wasn’t the best method and the results were inconsistent with the arm’s-length standard. The taxpayer filed a law suit in the U.S. Tax Court. On June 9, 2016, the Tax Court issued its decision stating that the IRS’s allocation of income to Medtronic for the intercompany licensing of intangibles was arbitrary, capricious, and unreasonable. The court rejected the IRS application of CPM and endorsed the comparable uncontrolled transaction (CUT) method applied by the taxpayer.

This paper addresses the IRS deficiency notice in the amount of $1.4 billion, Medtronic’s challenge and victory in the tax court, and the overturn in appeals. The case contains significant implications for tax courts, corporations and tax professionals relating to the application of the best transfer pricing method, the need for strict adherence to the regulations and analytical transparency. Tax analysis could now be subject to rigorous replication requirements.
Financial Review
Financial Review
"Shiller's CAPE: Market Efficiency and Risk" by Valentin Dimitrov and Prem C. Jain

Robert Shiller shows that Cyclically Adjusted Price to Earnings Ratio (CAPE) is strongly associated with future long‐term stock returns. This is often interpreted as evidence of market inefficiency. We present two findings contrary to such an interpretation.

First, if markets are efficient, stock returns should be higher than the risk‐free rate. We find that even when CAPE is in its ninth decile, future 10‐year stock returns, on average, are higher than future returns on 10‐year U.S. Treasurys. Thus, the results are largely consistent with market efficiency.

Second, consistent with a risk–return tradeoff, we find that CAPE is negatively associated with future stock market volatility.
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ
In March, Rutgers University announced plans to establish the Rutgers Institute for Corporate Social Innovation. Backed by a $1 million donation from alumnus Gary M. Cohen, RICSI “will embed interdisciplinary coursework into the Rutgers Business School curriculum to prepare students to drive successful business results in sustainable organizations that are financially, environmentally and socially responsible,” according to a university announcement.

“There are similarities between corporate social innovation and corporate social responsibility,” according to Michael Barnett, professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick. “The key distinction is that with CSI, we are focusing on innovation as the means through which corporations improve society,” while also advancing the firm’s interests.
Urban Land Institute
Urban Land Institute
ULI Leader Lyneir Richardson, executive director for the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, served as the panel’s chairman. “ULI created a truly rewarding service opportunity for the accomplished group of professionals on our panel,” Richardson said. “The land bridge is a novel real estate project concept that has the potential to essentially create ‘new land’ and can do so in a way that will actually foster inclusive economic growth and development. I genuinely hope that the full potential of the project is achieved – green space, housing, employment and wealth creation for neighborhood residents, health, education, and cultural heritage. If so, the Rondo community will be a national model for how government, the private sector, philanthropic and community leaders can work together to bring a big vision to fruition.”
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Friendship is one of life’s most important features, and one too often taken for granted. The human desire for companionship may feel boundless, but research suggests that our social capital is finite—we can handle only so many relationships at one time.

So what should you do if your social life is lacking? Reconnected friends can quickly recapture much of the trust they previously built, while offering each other a dash of novelty drawn from whatever they’ve been up to in the meantime. Levin et al., “Dormant Ties” (Organization Science, July–Aug. 2011)
Top Management Degrees
Top Management Degrees
Doctoral degrees are the highest accomplishment that a professional can reach to gain a competitive advantage for positions in both business and academia.

Doctorate programs are generally seen to be equal in status and rigor to the Ph.D., the programs simply have a different focus. DBA programs are uniquely aimed at professionals working in the business world who plan to pursue careers in organizations and consulting firms. While a PhD is generally for those interested in more research and academic goals and careers. Within both degree options, students can expect to find networking opportunities, exams, leadership training, highly specialized courses, seminars, and dissertation work.

To help prospective students looking for the right fit in an executive-level management doctorate, here is our list of the year’s Top 50 On-Campus Doctorate in Business Management programs in the nation.

#33 Rutgers University
offers a highly recognized PhD in Management through the Rutgers Business School. This well-respected program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Students in the PhD program will select a specialization in Accounting, Accounting Information Systems, Economics, Finance, Information Technology, International Business, Marketing, Operations Research, Organization Management, or Supply Chain Management.
WalletHub
WalletHub
When, if ever, should a small business owner consider a so-called secured business credit card?

A secure credit card is a credit card with a credit limit equal to the security deposit in the account (i.e., collateral). This is, if you have $1,000 in the account, your credit line limit will be $1,000. This type of credit, while limited, is useful for those who need to build a credit history. Secure credit cards behave, for all practical purposes, as a regular credit card. This means that the financial institution will provide regular credit reports to the credit bureaus, helping the credit card holder to establish a credit history. The better the handling of the card by the user (paying bills on time, keeping a balance) the better the credit history that it is developed.

Arturo E. Osorio
Assistant Professor of Professional Practice – Entrepreneurship, Management & Global Business at Rutgers Business School
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
The Rutgers chapter of Enactus is part of an international organization that supports community projects and provides long-term solutions to local businesses through employment and charitable activities.

The organization is currently helping the nonprofit Popcorn for the People, which hires and trains people on the Autism spectrum to make and sell gourmet popcorn.

It recently worked with the company to provide popcorn at Rutgers sports games.

Eugene Gentile, the director of the Office of Career Management in the Rutgers Business School and the faculty advisor of Enactus, said the organization tries to create long-term entrepreneurial solutions.

“What I find is that most of the time volunteer models eventually fail. Most of the time because they can be too labor intensive,” Gentile said. “We provide entrepreneurial solutions, this way an organization can continue to operate after a chapter leaves. We go in, set up a project and make sure that it can operate on it’s own, then (go) back out.”
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
The Rutgers Business School hosted 90 local high school students for a two-week camp this summer, providing both an academic and practical firsthand look into the world of business.

Now in its fifth year, students at the camp studied a wide variety of professions, including marketing, financing, accounting, managing and business analytics information technology (BAIT).

Ronald Richter, an assistant professor of Professional Practice at Rutgers Business School, co-created the program with other members of the department. Richter, who is also a former high school teacher, said he saw an opportunity to host a summer camp on Livingston campus after the new business school building was built.

It is important to give students a glimpse into both the industry and life at college, he said.

“I really wanted to keep the kids on campus, to let them know how this all goes down in the real world when you study this,” Richter said. “We’ve really seen this grow in popularity. The first year we had 18 campers, and five years later we had 90. We had to expand the camp from one week to two just to keep up.”
The News, International
The News, International
One of the many impediments that our society unfortunately possesses is the deficit of opportunities that we provide our women with. Safe and affordable access to transportation is one of them. While study finds out that the women in Karachi are four times less mobile than men, the statistics in rural areas are even more startling.

A possible solution to such issues lies in pilot projects that provide relief and benefits to a target audience. With an aim to bring an end to the transportation woes that women in Karachi encounter on a daily basis, 'Roshni Rides' is one such mission. A brainchild of four Pakistani-Americans recently graduated from Rutgers Business School in from New Jersey namely Gia Farooqi, Hasan Usmani, Hanaa Lakhani and Moneeb Mian, ‘Roshni Rides’ is deeply rooted in research that infers there exists a huge transportation crisis that female commuters suffer from. To alleviate the problem, ‘Roshni Rides’ provides a carpooling platform that connects to a network of nearby riders and dependable drivers. In Karachi, it is a cost-effective, easy-on-pocket means of transport that caters to women hailing from all walks of life, irrespective of their socio-economic affiliation, particularly labor workers, office workers and university students.

Team ‘Roshni Rides’ has since then been incubated at Karachi’s Nest i/O after moving to the city to launch the venture. On Thursday, the team hosted a panel discussion that was centered on mobility issues that women go through, which eventually impact their economic stability and financial independence.
Best Business Schools AACSB
Best Business Schools AACSB
Dominick DiCarlo, Elaine Lee, and Amanda Maher serve on the student executive board of Rutgers Business School’s (RBS) Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS) chapter, the international honor society for academic achievement in the study of business, located only at AACSB-accredited institutions.

For each, BGS has provided them with the opportunity to develop their leadership skills and advance their educational experience. In this interview, they share their perspective on how BGS has benefited their business education and how they feel it has prepared them for their future careers.
The CPA Journal, the voice of the profession
The CPA Journal
By Chanyuan (Abigail) Zhang, Jun Dai and Miklos A. Vasarhelyi, Ph.D.

The rapid pace of technological change continues to disrupt traditional procedures in all spheres, including the accounting profession. The authors examine the potential effects that disruptive technologies will have on both the profession at large and accounting education specifically. They provide suggestions for educators and universities on how to shape their curricula to meet the needs of the new environment.
Prudential Financial
Prudential Financial
Robert Falzon to succeed Mark Grier as Vice Chairman in December 2018 and a member of the Board of Directors in August 2019.

The Board also announced that Robert Falzon, Rutgers College (RC) ’81, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Prudential, has been named vice chairman of the company, effective December 1, 2018. Falzon will succeed Mark Grier, who will retire from Prudential and step down from the Board in August 2019, at which time Falzon will join the Board. Grier will transfer his functional management responsibilities to Falzon on December 1, 2018, and will support Falzon and Lowrey in their transitions, as well as focus on concluding some specific strategic projects.
Asbury Park Press
Asbury Park Press
Lord & Taylor, an anchor at Monmouth Mall for nearly 30 years, will close the store after the holiday shopping season, a company official said.

It gained a reputation for selling classical styled merchandise to high-end consumers, Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, said.

"The top end (shopping) is moving away and being dominated by a few retailers, and the mass is moving elsewhere, either to Target, Walmart or an Amazon," Kalan said. "If you think about it, they’re kind of caught in the middle."
My Central Jersey
My Central Jersey
Rutgers University has opened its doors this semester to the Class of 2022, the largest first-year class in the university’s history and one if its most diverse.

Many of the 9,300 students who have begun their post-high school academic careers on one of the university’s major campuses have already proven themselves both in and out of the classroom.

After four seasons as a standout at Millburn High School and much soul-searching, Peter Serruto postponed his chance to play Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Cincinnati Reds in favor of pursuing an academic career. Serruto of Millburn said it was the reputation of the Rutgers Business School as well as the Scarlet Knights’ baseball coaching staff that drew him to Rutgers-New Brunswick.
New Jersey Business
New Jersey Business
Rutgers University-Newark has had a presence in the city for more than 100 years, and today, boasts programs in industries ranging from arts and sciences, business and law to criminal justice, public affairs, and administration. The university employs some 1,600 faculty and staff members, spends a net of $356 million a year on salaries, and contributes local tax revenues of $31 million.

“We want to serve as a direct strategic partner in support of the city of Newark. We work closely with the mayor’s office and strive to be an anchor institution that’s committed to creating pathways for local residents to access our university,” says Arcelio Aponte, senior vice chancellor for administration and economic development and chief financial officer of Rutgers University-Newark. “We’re always working to develop our own strategic initiatives, but we’re also trying to meet the mayor’s expectations in terms of local procurement and having more faculty and staff live locally.”