Media Coverage

YAHOO! Finance
YAHOO! Finance
Leading litigation funder Validity Finance has launched a new Equal Access Fellowship, providing a paid summer fellowship to first-year law students of diverse backgrounds. For 2019, the company has selected two distinguished first-year students to spend the summer in Validity's New York office, with an option to split their time working for a pro bono organization of their choice.

The two inaugural Equal Access Fellows are New York University School of Law JD candidate Amanda Gonzalez Burton and Georgetown University Law Center JD candidate Jarrett Lewis.

Amanda Gonzalez Burton is a 1L at New York University School of Law, where she is a recipient of the Norma Z. Paige Scholarship and is a Dean's Scholar and Birnbaum Women's Leadership Fellow. She is a board member of the Latinx Law Students Association. She previously worked for Teach for America and as a Sponsor for Educational Opportunity Law Fellows at Clifford Chance. Ms. Burton obtained an MBA from Rutgers Business School in 2014 and a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences from Florida State University in 2009, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa.
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
Within the Rutgers Business School (RBS), Blockchain Hub is a new student-run initiative that revolves around educating and training students on blockchain technology, which is a record of data that is not owned by a single entity.

Won Gyun No, an assistant professor in the Department of Accounting and Information Systems, said blockchain can record almost anything that can be digitally represented, such as transactions, values, goods and ownership. The technology can also be applied to a variety of industries, such as healthcare, insurance and government.
Find-MBA.com
Find-MBA.com
Top Business Schools for Healthcare / Pharma / Biotech 2019

Located in what is known as "The Healthcare City" - Rutgers is close to big pharma companies like Johnson & Johnson and Bristol-Myers Squibb, as well as several large hospitals. Rutgers' Pharmaceutical Management MBA concentration and the Lerner Center—which publishes relevant research and puts on events—further strengthen the school's links to the biopharmaceutical industry. Thirty-seven percent of the class of 2018 went into the healthcare or pharma industries, one of the highest rates of any school that FIND MBA surveyed.

Top Business Schools for Operations Management 2019

Through Rutgers' Center for Operations Research, students can pursue a dual-degree MBA / MS in Operations Research and Business Analytics, which covers topics in information technology, analytics, and related areas. Over 30 percent of Rutgers’ 2018 MBA graduates went into operations and related roles.

Top Business Schools for Supply Chain Management 2019

In 2009, Rutgers Business School founded the Center for Supply Chain Management, which offers a certificate in supply chain management and produces a range of relevant publications. The school offers an MBA in Supply Chain Management, which is ranked highly in Gartner's 2018 Top 25 North American Supply Chain University Graduate Programs. Over thirty percent of Rutgers’ MBA class of 2018 went into operations or logistic roles.
Daily News
Daily News
During Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, he vociferously complained that the tax system, indeed the entire economy, was rigged. Turns out, he’s right: The tax system is rigged. However, what Trump repeatedly failed to point out, and what is confirmed by a revelatory new New York Times report showing his huge losses and paltry tax payments over a decade, is that he and his family were and are benefactors of this system.

Consider some salient facts: Income based on labor, which is how the vast majority of working stiffs make a living, bears both payroll and income tax. The combined tax rate is often in excess of 50%. By way of stark contrast, the tax on capital income is taxed only once and at tax rates less than half imposed on labor, often 23.8%.
IdeaMensch
IdeaMensch
Ginger is the founder & CEO at Grace Kingdom Beauty, a cosmetic product development firm in New Jersey where she consults for cosmetic brands, contract manufacturers and raw material suppliers. She has previously held management positions with Barnet Products Corporation, (cosmetic Raw material supplier), ChemAid Laboratories (cosmetic contract manufacturer), Freeze 24/7 International (Cosmetic marketing company), Avon Products Inc. (Fortune 500 company), Joico laboratories (salon hair care) and Jason Natural Cosmetics (Natural Cosmetics).

Additionally, Ginger has been an adjunct professor at Rutgers Business School teaching a Saturday class on Business of Fashion/Beauty.
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ
Small businesses can be targeted “not only for their information, but because they may be a gateway to larger companies,” said Jaideep Vaidya, a Rutgers University management science and information systems professor. “That’s what happened in the massive Target breach,” when digital credentials — reportedly hacked from a third-party HVAC vendor — were used to get into the retailer’s systems, snatching payment and personal information from millions of customers.

The fallout from a hack like that can decimate a small business, he warned. “Once customers find out — and they likely will, depending on state-level breach reporting requirements — they may abandon you.”

But securing the vaults doesn’t have to break a small business’ budget. A good defense will comprise multiple layers, he said, including commercially available — and relatively inexpensive — antivirus software, in addition to a firewall that can help shield a system from unauthorized access.

“Best practices include choosing complicated passwords, and changing them periodically,” he said. “Multifactor authorization [after a password is entered, a separate code will be sent to a mobile device, and that must be entered too] also enhances security. Additionally, software can be configured to automatically accept security updates, which are an important safety factor.”
NJTV News
NJTV News
A 20,000 square foot redeveloped building on Jersey City’s Martin Luther King Jr. Drive is the new national headquarters of Rising Tide Capital, a nonprofit founded 15 years ago.

When completed, 311 MLK will house an Urban Entrepreneurship Accelerator for folks from all over the state who are eager to start a business. They can come to the building for classes, guidance, coaching and connection to sources of funding.

Jeffrey Robinson, the academic director of Rutgers University’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, says it’s not just about what a business accelerator offers, it’s also about what entrepreneurs bring to the experience.

“They need to be focused on what they’re doing, but willing to accept some critique, some criticism, in some cases, some advice from other folks. Sometimes entrepreneurs don’t want to listen to anybody else,” said Robinson.
Rutgers University
Rutgers University
Jose Baez, a first-generation college student, credits the Rutgers Road to Wall Street program for preparing and providing him with the resources to intern with J.P. Morgan's Commercial Real Estate division this summer.
CBS News Sunday Morning
CBS News Sunday Morning
Kevin Lyons, who teaches supply chain management at Rutgers University, says it's the same problem year after year.

Visiting a landfill in Burlington County, N.J., Braver asked Lyons, "The number I keep hearing is there's something like four billion tons of unused goods that still ends up getting dumped in places like this?"

"That's correct. Instead of packaging it and maybe possibly getting it to folks that might need it, it's easier for them just to get it off their books," Lyons said.

"Have things improved over the years?"

"It has improved a little," he replied. "But not enough to handle the glut."
Entrepreneur
Entrepreneur
Gabriela Tonietto, a professor of marketing at Rutgers University, and Selin Malkoc, a professor of marketing of Ohio State University discovered that when a leisure activity is planned, it’s less enjoyable than if it had taken place spontaneously.

“It becomes a part of our to-do list,” Malkoc told The Washington Post. “As an outcome, they [the activity] becomes less enjoyable.” Additionally, in the constant quest to improve productivity, we over-schedule activities. If we lineup every minute with an event, it means we’re doing more and enjoying less.
NJ.com
NJ.com
Tax attorney Jay Soled, a professor at Rutgers Business School and director of the university’s Masters in Taxation Program, said accelerated write-offs essentially allow companies to expense anything they purchase.

“It juices up the economy on a temporary basis and minimizes their tax burden,” he said.

At the same time, Soled noted companies in general have become very proficient in parking their income offshore. That causes companies, for tax purposes, to avoid showing a lot of profit.

Still, he cautioned that if companies pay more in taxes, that ultimately gets passed on to someone else.
New Mobility
New Mobility
In June 2017, another study, this one from researchers at the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations, found Airbnb users with disabilities were less likely to be preapproved and more likely to be rejected outright.“The rise of internet-based platforms for some services threatens to perpetuate and possibly increase their exclusion. Many of the newly-available services are not fully accessible and may create more opportunities for both intentional and unintentional discrimination,” wrote Mason Ameri, the lead researcher.

The study found that only 25% of guests with a spinal cord injury were preapproved, compared with 75% of guests without disabilities. Even hosts who advertised their listing as “wheelchair accessible” were more likely to approve a guest without a disability (80%) than a guest with a spinal cord injury (60%).
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York today announced the formation of the Education and Industry Forum on Financial Services Culture (the Forum), a private-sector group sponsored by the New York Fed. The Forum’s first meeting will be May 7, 2019.

The primary goal of the Forum is to provide regular opportunities for senior representatives from business schools and financial institutions to identify challenges faced by the financial services industry with regard to culture and conduct, and identify possible areas of collaboration to address them.

Education and Industry Forum on Financial Services Culture Members include
Joanne B. Ciulla, Professor and Director of the Institute for Ethical Leadership, Rutgers Business School
Enterra Solutions
Enterra Solutions
John Impellizzeri, an Assistant Professor of Professional Practice at the Rutgers Business School and former supply chain executive, predicts analytics will become a future enterprise differentiator. He explains, “Twenty years ago, Boston Consulting Group’s Harold Sirkin warned that competition is no longer ‘company versus company but supply chain versus supply chain,’ signaling a new era of supply chain relevance. As we sit here today, perhaps we can refine Sirkin’s hypothesis to a battle over the competency of ‘supply chain analytics versus supply chain analytics’.”
Yahoo Finace
Yahoo Finance
DesignRush.com, a B2B marketplace connecting brands with agencies, researched and discovered the 25 best undergraduate marketing programs that deliver top-notch educations, immersive experience, and advantageous employment opportunities through internships and post-graduate jobs.

The Marketing department at Rutgers Business School focuses on the importance of marketing science. The professors and faculty members are all practitioners or experts in marketing strategy, marketing strategy, research and consumer behavior, digital marketing, marketing in the pharmaceutical industry, customer relationship marketing, database marketing, retail marketing, marketing analytics as well as marketing in the fashion and luxury industry and real estate. Plus, its New Jersey location helps students secure prime internships and careers throughout New York, Philadelphia, the tri-state area and beyond.

http://www.business.rutgers.edu/faculty-research/marketing
TEDx Rutgers
TEDx Rutgers
We don’t mean to instantly mistrust others who are different from us, but, unfortunately, we do. Unfamiliar social categories incite fear of the unknown and potentially limit opportunities. In this talk, I will share with you how these social categories, such as a disability or even the use of a name can trigger resistance from others. Evidence from the research will be shared to offer perspective on how this process unfolds among us.
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
Before Warren Choi, a Rutgers Business School junior and president of the club fencing team, captured the sabre title at this year’s United States Associate of Collegiate Fencing Clubs (USACFC) National Championships, on April 7, he first had to coordinate the travel logistics to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, where the event was being held.
Inside Supply Management Magazine
Inside Supply Management Magazine
Rudi Leuschner, associate professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick, New Jersey, expects the profession to continue to attract talent from other professions. As program director for Rutgers Business School’s online supply chain management master’s program, he finds that many graduate students don’t have a bachelor’s degree in business or supply management.

"There have always been people who took coursework from other areas," he says. "That trend is going to continue as the complexity of supply management keeps increasing."
The Signal
The Signal
Now working in New York City as a professional art investor and financial advisor, he stresses the importance of interdisciplinary thinking, both in college and throughout one’s career.
Bryan Faller said that he was able to use his degree in art history and his M.B.A. from Rutgers Business School to combine all of his interests and turn his passion into a career.
Tiempo ABC7NY
Tiempo ABC7NY
Jasmine Cordero, Managing Director of the Rutgers University Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED) in Newark, NJ and Hilda Mera, co-owner of S&A Auto Repair in Newark, NJ (and a graduate of CUEED’s Entrepreneurship Pioneers Initiative), discuss the benefits that CUEED’s training/mentorship/networking programs deliver to minority entrepreneurs, their employees, and urban communities.
NJ.com
NJ.com
New Jersey will, whether by legislation or referendum, sooner or later harvest the economic benefits of legalized marijuana. I hope that, while capturing new tax revenue, we ensure the new weed-based business opportunities help the communities most damaged by prohibition.
Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle
“Our research shows that there are more and more requests for our attention. That means we have to prioritize, and that more things slip — and that there are enough other demands for our attention that if one does slip, it doesn’t rise to the surface again,” Terri Kurtzberg, a management professor at Rutgers Business School says. “It’s coupled with the fact that so many more people can figure out how to get access to us: People can find your email and send you direct requests so easily.”
Criteria for Success
Criteria for Success
Dr. Crawford is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers University in the Rutgers Business School — Newark and New Brunswick. After working in the industry for two decades and founding his own consulting company, Dr. Crawford received his PhD in Entrepreneurship from the University of Louisville in 2013. His dissertation, “Causes of Extreme Outcomes in Entrepreneurship,” received a $20,000 Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Award.

In today’s episode, we talk to Dr. Crawford about entrepreneurship, business development, and his incredible research!
CentralJersey.com
CentralJersey.com
Six students from Mercer County Community College (MCCC) were all business at the 2019 New Jersey County College Case Competition at Rutgers Business School on April 5, capturing first prize for their creative, yet practical, business plan for a fledging chocolate company. The competition, now in its fourth year, is sponsored by Rutgers Business School and M&T Bank.

A panel of experts and a Rutgers Business School instructor served as judges: M&T Bank executives Mallory Boron and Thomas Comiskey, Prudential Financial executive Jennifer Rodrigues, Frank Giarratano of SGW Integrated Marketing Communications, and Rutgers faculty member Arturo Osorio.
WalletHub
WalletHub
What tips do you have for celebrating Easter on a budget?

Easter is a holiday of family celebration. While many feel new clothes and home decorations are part of the festival, if budgets are an issue as they are for so many, just focus on sharing a wonderful meal together and have everyone agree that the dress of the occasion should come from each person’s existing wardrobe, no new purchases of clothing (after all, clothing was not a major item in the historical Easter event) needed, the real celebration is to share with family and friends.

Marc Kalan
Assistant Professor of Professional Practice, Rutgers Business School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Business Because
Business Because
The Mini MBA offers something very different—an accelerated business program, with an emphasis on the student's specific needs. For those interested in studying longer term, or those looking to supplement their business education, the Mini MBA can be the perfect complement to a full-time MBA.

Peter Methot, director of Executive Education at Rutgers Business School, notes how their portfolio of Mini MBA programs is topping up business knowledge.

“In our digital marketing program, almost everyone that comes has an MBA—they just earned it before digital marketing was part of the curriculum,” Peter comments.
Rutgers University Newark
Rutgers University Newark
This year’s ACUE faculty graduates include: Camil Golub of the Philosophy Department, Paula Catalan of the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science, and Pushpi Paranamana from the School of Arts and Sciences-Newark (SASN); Constance Sabon Sensor, assistant professor from the School of Nursing; Adam Strobel and William Clemons from the School of Public Affairs and Administration at Rutgers University–Newark (SPAA); and Leon Fraser from the Department of Management & Global Business at the Rutgers Business School (RBS). The luncheon also recognized graduate student instructors Huan Wang and Alexander Jaffery, both from the Department of Management & Global Business at RBS. In addition, Oren Rabinovich from SASN was recognized for completing the module on "Developing Self-Directed Learners." Each honoree received an honorary certificate and red graduation stole.
Hunt Scanlon Media
Hunt Scanlon Media
Executive recruitment firm DHR International has recently placed top leaders at three major arts and cultural institutions: Onassis Foundation USA, the Tennessee Performing Arts Center and the Sag Harbor Cinema Arts Center. James Abruzzo, managing partner of the firm’s global non-profit practice, led the assignments.

Mr. Abruzzo, who works out of New York, has more than 30 years of experience as an executive search consultant to non-profit organizations. His clients include mid-sized to large social service organizations, universities, arts/cultural, international relief, foundations and trade associations. In addition, he is a trained management consultant and is well-known for his work in executive compensation for non-profit executives. Mr. Abruzzo is also co-director and co-founder of the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School. This center hosts symposia and workshops for non-profit leaders, operates a certificate program in non-profit leadership, provides consulting to non-profit organizations and conducts research on critical non-profit issues. He also serves on the faculty of the Rutgers Business School.
Rhythmic FM
Rhythmic FM
All roads lead to Newark on April 25-26 for the MOBE Symposium. An acronym for Marketing Opportunities in Business and Entertainment, MOBE has long been recognized as a respected marketing conference for Black professionals and entrepreneurs, as well as those targeting the Black consumer market.

Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED) at Rutgers-Newark, has curated a global marketing panel with extensive experience in Africa, Asia and Europe to discuss strategies for making connections and profitable deals in other countries.
Sunday Morning
Sunday Morning
Our annual special broadcast that looks into the many ways we earn, spend, invest, waste, lose, and go without money, featuring guest host Martha Teichner.

COMMERCE: Many happy returns
Typically about 8% of items purchased at a store will be returned; for ecommerce sites, that can be 25% to 40%. And all the stuff that stores cannot easily resell will wind up in the secondary market, where one company's trash can become other people's treasure. Rita Braver visits liquidators who process and resell goods that are just as good as new, or even newer.

Kevin Lyons, Rutgers Business School, Rutgers University
Academy of Management Insights
Academy of Management Insights
In “No Room at the Inn? Disability Access in the New Sharing Economy,” the authors detailed how disabled Airbnb users faced discrimination by Airbnb home renters, and cited an earlier Harvard University study about Airbnb users facing racial discrimination.

“Many people who join Airbnb or the sharing economy are generally doing it to make a buck. But unfortunately, the traditional ways in which we make that dollar don’t necessarily apply to these Internet platforms. As a result, the U.S. laws that traditionally enforce equal access—whether it’s the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964—need to catch up. Otherwise, without proper policing, it’s just going to keep spiraling downward, undoing these seminal laws in this growing bubble that is the sharing economy,” said Mason Ameri of Rutgers University.
WFMZ-TV News
WFMZ-TV News
Of course as parents we love our children equally, but do we play favorites when it comes to money?

Rutgers University marketing professor Kristina Durante and her colleagues tested that theory.

“We were having parents enter a lottery to win a treasury bond worth $25. Parents had to tell them with a name which child they would give the treasury bond to," Durante said.

The parents could only enter once and had to choose between their girl or their boy for the potential winnings. Moms chose daughters. Dads chose their sons.

“It suggests that we do play favorites, even if we don’t think that we do,” said Durante.
Rutgers University News
Rutgers University News
The Newark Anchor Collaborative (NAC), a Newark Alliance initiative, held a vendor summit on Friday, March 29 in support of the City of Newark’s Hire.Buy.Live program to connect local suppliers with anchor organizations and procurement professionals.

Rutgers University – Newark’s Dr. Kevin Lyons, who is Buy Local Coordinator for NAC, sees great promise that this event “will help to shift the practice of purchasing culture in Newark.” Informed by his extensive research in Newark as Associate Professor, Supply Chain Archeology and Director, Public Private Community Partnership Program at Rutgers Business School, Lyons says, “By highlighting Newark suppliers of goods and services and recognizing their excellence, we will allow for connections that will keep investment circulating within the city.”
Federal Reserve Richmond
Federal Reserve Richmond
The 2019 proxy season will mark the second year firms have to disclose how their CEOs' compensation compares to the pay of their median employee. The ratios are likely to generate quite a few headlines, as they did last year, and perhaps some outrage, especially in light of relatively stagnant wage increase for most workers in recent years.

Since 2011, large publicly traded firms have been required to allow their shareholders a nonbinding vote on executive pay packages. The goal of "Say on Pay," which was part of the Dodd-Frank Act after the financial crisis, was to rein in executive compensation and enable shareholders to tie pay more closely to performance. But research by Jill Fisch of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Darius Palia of Rutgers Business School, and Steven Davidoff Solomon of Berkeley Law suggests shareholders are highly influenced by the company's performance; that is, they tend to approve pay packages when the stock is doing well.
Marketplace
Marketplace
Try making a list of the things that the cryptocurrency known as bitcoin can be used for, and a few uses may spring to mind: some merchants accept it as payment, some investors trade it and, sometimes, bitcoin is used for cyber crime.

Here’s one more thing to add to that list: this tax season, businesses in Ohio have the option of paying their taxes with it.

Still, a state government's acceptance of bitcoin as a method of payment is a significant development in the cryptocurrency space, said Tobey Scharding, a visiting assistant professor of business ethics at Rutgers University. Scharding points out that cryptocurrency was founded, in part, as a way to conduct transactions free from government control. But now? “Here’s Ohio stepping in and saying, ‘Hey, you can actually pay your taxes in bitcoins,'" she said.
New Jersey Business
New Jersey Business
A team from Mercer County Community College captures first prize in the 2019 New Jersey County College Case Competition at Rutgers Business School on April 5.

A panel of business professionals and a Rutgers Business School instructor served as judges: Mallory Boron, M&T Bank administrative vice president and retail market manager for New Jersey; Thomas Comiskey, M&T Bank, regional president for New Jersey; Frank Giarratano, president and chief operation officer of SGW Integrated Marketing Communications; Arturo Osorio Fernandez, an assistant professor of professional practice at Rutgers; and Jennifer Rodrigues, Prudential Financial, vice president, planning and analysis.
Homestake Capital, LLC
Homestake Capital, LLC
Michael J. Kokes was recently selected to be a guest lecturer at Rutgers Center for Real Estate. “It was an honor to meet the diverse and intelligent individuals enrolled in the program,” said Kokes. “It is great to see what Professor Davis has been able to accomplish in such a short period of time, and it is even more encouraging to know that we have such a promising program right here in New Jersey that will develop the industry leaders of tomorrow.”

Morris A. Davis, Ph.D., Paul V. Profeta Chair of Real Estate and Professor of Finance and Economics, as well as Academic Director of Rutgers Center of Real Estate at Rutgers Business School, first met Kokes at an event that Rutgers co-hosted with Pulte Homes at the New York Stock Exchange.

“Mike and I have been in discussions about how Homestake and Rutgers can work together since that initial meeting,” Davis noted. “We have considered mentorships, internships, full time positions, scholarships, as well as consulting, lecturing, etc. It is a great benefit to Rutgers students and the Rutgers Center for Real Estate to partner with a young entrepreneur who has a lot of experience and connections.”
ROI, Informing and connecting businesses in New Jersey
Return on Information (ROI)
Being able to apply the business principles learned in school to the real world is a critical skill for any growing business professional.

The students presenting Friday at the fourth annual New Jersey Community College Case Competition presented by M&T Bank at Rutgers Business School in Newark were no exception.

“I want to get actual hands-on experience and see how it is. I want to be put in situations like this, where you get a taste of reality,” said Tirrell Johnson, one of the student presenters from Middlesex County College, when asked what he wanted out of a business education. “School is one thing, but seeing what it’s actually like sitting down at the table is another.”
The Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog
The Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog
Firms disclose a variety of information to the public, some because they are required to do so by law or regulations, and others voluntarily because they want, for example, to signal their creditworthiness to potential investors. The level and effectiveness of financial institutions’ regulatory oversight have been widely debated since the onset of the financial crisis of 2007-2009. Financial and banking regulators have responded by increasing regulatory requirements and oversight, and by mandating greater disclosure of information. However, these actions do not necessarily improve the information environment of firms if they discourage voluntary disclosures of other types of information. In our paper, we investigate whether enhanced regulatory oversight and mandatory disclosure requirements affect regulated banks’ voluntary disclosures (Beyer et al. 2010). In particular, we take advantage of the artificial size-thresholds imposed by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Customer Protection Act of 2010 (DFA) to identify large banks that are directly affected by increased mandatory disclosure and heightened regulatory oversight and compare them with unaffected banks and financial institutions that are not subject to banking regulations.
Kristina Evey podcast
Kristina Evey podcast
Customer Experience expert Blake Morgan joins me on this episode and shares her thoughts on how companies can learn to embed CX into their culture.

Blake Morgan is a leader in customer experience. As a keynote speaker and customer experience futurist, she has worked with Accor Hotels, Accenture, Adobe, Parker Hannifin, Ericsson, Omron, Verizon, and many other organizations. She is also an adjunct faculty member of the executive MBA program at Rutgers Business School and a guest lecturer at Columbia University. Her first book is More is More: How the Best Companies Work Harder and Go Farther to Create Knock-Your-Socks-Off Customer Experiences. Blake contributes to Forbes, Harvard Business Review, and Hemispheres magazine. Additionally, she hosts The Modern Customer Podcast and a weekly customer experience video series on YouTube.
College News Updates
College News Updates
As they file their taxes this year, New Jersey residents may be left scratching their heads, and many may be upset that their returns are smaller than expected. The reason: this is the first year taxpayers will file under the new rules created in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

We spoke with Jay Soled, a professor and director of the master of accountancy in taxation program at Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick, to find out what New Jersey taxpayers can expect.

Q: Under the new federal tax code, what changes will New Jersey taxpayers see?

Taxpayers face a choice when filing: they can take a standard deduction or they can “itemize” their expenses that they incurred throughout the year such as state income and local property taxes they pay, charitable contributions they make and medical expenses. You cannot deduct the standard deduction and itemize; it’s one or the other.
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
Rutgers’ Road to Wall Street program gives rising sophomores an opportunity to experience the world of Wall Street as well as a glimpse into some of the most elite positions in financing, said Kenneth Freeman, an adjunct professor in the Department of Finance and director of the Road to Wall Street program at Rutgers Business School.

“I like to call it, 'The Navy Seals of Financing' — that's who we are looking to train,” Freeman said. “Ultimately, the purpose of this course is to prepare these students for interviews as well as their future jobs, giving them the tools to navigate and get their hands on these jobs.”
Public Finance International
Public Finance International
Our partnership with CIPFA offers a professional passport of sorts - allowing students at Rutgers to accelerate their career with a globally recognized credential for professionals in public finance.

It creates a pathway for US students enrolled at Rutgers University to practice governmental accounting outside the United States, and take advantage of global opportunities.

The Rutgers’ 'master of accountancy in governmental accounting program' is already unique in the United States, allowing students in the US and abroad to learn about US accounting standards. Under the new agreement with CIPFA, current students and graduates of the program will be given the opportunity to qualify as a Chartered Public Finance Accountant through CIPFA’s online platform.
The Press of Atlantic City
The Press of Atlantic City
Assemblyman Vince Mazzeo, D-Atlantic, and Sen. Chris Brown, R-Atlantic, said Sunday they are unsure how they will vote and that much will depend on what is in the final version of the legislation.

From a business perspective, Lyneir Richardson, executive director of The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED) at Rutgers Business School, predicted legalized recreational cannabis “will quickly be a $40 billion-dollar-plus industry. And the local economic impact will be huge.”

Richardson said the new industry would strengthen inner-city neighborhoods.
MarketScreener.com
MarketScreener
The arrests last week of seven area residents, who all pleaded not guilty, in the ongoing federal investigation into health benefits fraud has brought renewed attention to the case that has seen 23 South Jersey residents plead guilty since 2017.

Compounded medications, which are unregulated by the FDA, are legal and pharmacies can receive large payouts from insurers for the often expensive medications, which contributes to the abuse, said Michael Barnett, a professor of management and global business at Rutgers University and a fellow with the Institute of Ethical Leadership at the school.
Poets & Quants for Undergraduates
Poets & Quants
Where will you be working after graduation?
Ross Stores, Inc; Location Planning Analyst

What did you enjoy most about your business school?
Meeting so many driven students who use knowledge and skills learned from the business school to pursue their passions.

What is the biggest lesson you gained from studying business?
It’s not about what you know, but how you use what you know.
Poets & Quants for Undergraduates
Poets & Quants
Where will you be working after graduation?
J.P. Morgan Chase, New York City, Global Finance & Business Management Analyst

Who is your favorite professor?
I’ve been fortunate enough to take classes with many great professors. It is so difficult to pick one. My two favorites are Professor Lisa Kaplowitz, who teaches corporate finance, and Professor Fred Hoffman, who teaches financial institutions and markets. I appreciate their ability to integrate their own experiences on Wall Street into the courses, which helps students get a better understanding of the material.
Poets & Quants for Undergraduates
Poets & Quants
Where will you be working after graduation?
Evercore, Investment Banking Analyst – New York, N.Y.

Who is your favorite professor?
Professor Charles Citro. I admire his ability to leave the contents of the textbook and discuss trending topics in financial markets and help students in a professional sense. Taking a class with him introduced me to how finance is put into practice in the real world.
Poets & Quants for Undergraduates
Poets & Quants
Where will you be working after graduation?
I have accepted a full-time offer from Deloitte, where I will be working as a Strategy and Operations consultant.

Who is your favorite professor?
Professor Francis Ng has been my favorite college professor. I have taken three finance classes with him over the years, and he continues to amaze me. His classroom lectures further developed my interest and knowledge of finance. However, it was our conversations during his office hours that had made him my favorite professor. We would begin our conversations about specific stocks and then expand the discussions to include geopolitical factors and trends that influence the movement of a company’s stock and the stock market itself. Through this, Professor Ng taught me analytical thinking and how politics and economic forces impact companies.
Analytics India
Analytics India
AI can detect suspicious behaviour and alert shop personnel of possible shoplifters.

A Japanese startup Vaak has successfully installed and tested the tech in local convenience stores which cut down shoplifting losses by 77 percent. The system collectively works with the shop’s surveillance cameras to identify possible thefts that the staffers might miss.

Another criticism came from Jerome Williams, a professor and senior administrator at Rutgers University’s Newark campus. He said that the unfair practices of human beings alone can result in a biased system. He raised concerns about the training data teaching the system a wrong sense of targeting the shoppers based on skin colour. He said that black people often fall victim to injustice and are often routinely stopped on suspicion. “The people who get caught for shoplifting is not an indication of who’s shoplifting,” He said. “It’s a function of who’s being watched and who’s being caught, and that’s based on discriminatory practices.”