NJ Tech Weekly
NJ Tech Weekly
Panelist Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUEED), at Rutgers Business School, discussed the many “capacity-building” programs aimed at Black and Latino students and community members. These programs provide skills, knowledge, tools and mentorship to get urban businesses to the next level.

CUEED started more than 10 years ago in order to foster more diversity among entrepreneurs. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve assisted over 500 entrepreneurs, with 70 percent of entrepreneurs of color and over 60 percent women,” Richardson stated.

He added, “I’m proud of the fact that over 40 percent of them now [each generates] more than $1 million in revenue.” A million dollars is a threshold of business viability and customer acceptance, Richardson noted. It indicates a company’s readiness to talk to bankers and investors. The Center’s goal is to help 1,000 entrepreneurs achieve a million dollars in annual revenue.
Tap Into
Tap Into
Yla Eason
Assistant Professor of Professional Practice, Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick

In a recent report by Citibank, their research revealed startling facts about the cost of discrimination. When I read that “not addressing racial gaps between Blacks and whites has cost the U.S. economy up to $16 trillion over the past 20 years,” I was stunned.

First, I was amazed that Citibank would begin to explore racial financial discrimination when banks are often contributors to this malaise. I knew research by the late Rutgers professor Jerome Williams revealed that the actual treatment of Black-owned businesses seeking small business loans from banks “is consistently poor” and “significantly inferior in critical ways.”

Second, it made me think of the harsh criticism I often hear that generally starts with: “Why don’t Black people own more businesses?” I bristle at this question because it assumes a level playing field exists for those of us who do start businesses. Too often we discover the strange ways our efforts to create wealth through individual ownership of the means of production – basically capitalism – is thwarted by the very institutions that would benefit from it.

As a Black woman business owner who started a toy company in 1985 and grew it to $5 million in sales, I sadly learned that my revenue achievement put me at the top 3 percent of Black-owned businesses. While proud of my accomplishment, it was a stark reminder that our upper level was a lower-middle range for white-owned businesses. The lack of access to capital is one of the reasons for this disparity.

As the report summarized, “providing fair and equitable lending to Black entrepreneurs, might have resulted in the creation of an additional $13 trillion in business revenue and potentially created 6 million jobs per year.”

It’s not too late to change.
The Harvard Crimson
The Harvard Crimson
Rutgers Business School professor John M. Longo called the University’s 2020 return “very respectable,” comparing the 7.3 percent return to a passive investment strategy of investing 60 percent in more risky assets and 40 percent in less risky assets.

“The 7.3% return of Harvard endowment in the most recent fiscal year is very respectable,” Longo wrote in an email. “Although not exactly comparable, a low cost, 60% stock, 40% bond fixed income U.S. portfolio delivered a return of 6.7%.”

Longo wrote that Harvard’s generalist model allows the school to vary its investment strategy for its financial gain.

“No one firm or institution has a monopoly on investment talent. Harvard’s generalist model has the advantage of not being beholden to a single manager or single investment approach,” Longo wrote. “Rather, Harvard’s investment team may scour the world for best-of-breed investment managers across a range of asset classes.”
Synced
Synced
The Thirty-Fifth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-21) kicked off today as a virtual conference. The organizing committee announced the Best Paper Awards and Runners Up during this morning’s opening ceremony. Three papers received Best Paper Awards and three were recognized as Runners Up.

Best Paper Awards
Informer: Beyond Efficient Transformer for Long Sequence Time-Series Forecasting

Institution(s): Beihang University, UC Berkeley, Rutgers University, Beijing Guowang Fuda Science & Technology Development Company

Authors: Haoyi Zhou, Shanghang Zhang, Jieqi Peng, Shuai Zhang, Jianxin Li, Hui Xiong, Wancai Zhang
Paterson Times
Paterson Times
Sankofa is a word in the Twi language of Ghana that literally translates “fetch it go back and get it or “it is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten.”

The Sankofa concept advocates and encourages efforts to explore, examine, and educate blacks about the cultural and historical contributions of the Black diaspora. The foundations of Sankofa, fueled the establishment of a designated period to reflect and commemorate the historical contributions of peoples of African descent.

The evolution of Black History Month in the United States coincided with and was informed by the civil rights and Black movements. It would take decades of struggle for those movements to awaken the national consciousness and receive broad endorsement — particularly at the federal level. Today, Black History Month is widely observed not only in the United States but in several foreign countries throughout the diaspora. Despite wide acknowledgement, the observation, incites considerable controversy.
Sentinel & Enterprise
Sentinel & Enterprise
Fitchburg State University will celebrate Black History Month in February with a series of events exploring themes centered on the Black family.
The theme for the university events was inspired by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.
For the university’s exploration of these topics, Fitchburg State’s Black History Month committee, including cross-sectional representation within the institution, solicited programs from across all campus constituencies.

Presentations will include a talk by Fitchburg State alumna Yla Eason ’71, a professor at Rutgers University, who founded a multicultural toy company that featured the first Black superhero toy created to promote positive self-images for her son and other children.
The New York Times
The New York Times
The transformation, fueled largely by a push to expand affordable housing and homeownership in this city of renters, is part of a deliberate strategy with an ambitious goal: erasing Newark’s long legacy of blight without pushing out residents, 86 percent of whom are Black or Latino.

Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School, ran Newark’s economic development corporation under the city’s former mayor, U.S. Senator Cory Booker.
“Getting investment to happen — it’s evolutionary, not revolutionary,” Professor Richardson said.
“And you’ve got to celebrate flowers in the concrete.”
Wallet Hub
WalletHub
As the saying goes, “money can’t buy love.” But it certainly can express it. This year, Americans collectively will spend more than $21.8 billion on Valentine’s day gifts — from greeting cards to jewelry to a special night out — with the average lovebird shelling out $164.76.

What can Valentine’s spending trends tell us about consumer confidence and the health of the overall economy?

Vice Chair and Associate Professor of Marketing, Kristina M. Durante said, "Like the holidays (Christmas, New Year’s) a couple of months ago, Valentine’s Day is an excuse to bring a little cheer to an otherwise uncertain time. Consumer spending may look different from other years with much of it happening online. Also, many of the options for bigger ticket spending are off the table such as weekends away or dinners out. While total spending may be down, consumers will still be motivated to bring some positivity to lockdown and some warmth to the frigid winter across much of the nation."
WalletHub
WalletHub
What are the most common mistakes people make when shopping for a car?

One common mistake is not being aware of the dealer invoice price, which is usually several thousand dollars below the manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP). Consumers should aim for a price as close as possible to the dealer invoice price. Another mistake is not shopping around for a good deal. A fair amount of pricing knowledge may be obtained by searching the internet. People that hate haggling over prices, a sizeable part of the population, should look into car buying services, such as that offered by Costco.
Yahoo Finance
Yahoo Finance
Make sure your emergency fund is set before spending on wish-list items, advises John M. Longo, Ph.D., CFA, professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School and author of “Buffett’s Tips: A Guide to Financial Literacy and Life.”

“The COVID-19 pandemic has made most understand that they should have an emergency fund of at least six months living expenses,” Longo said. “If you must shop online for non-necessities, then wait until your emergency fund is fully funded.”
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
What a post-pandemic recovery and the Biden White House could mean for the state’s manufacturers.

On Jan. 26, President Joe Biden signed the “Buy American” order, aiming to close loopholes in the federal government’s requirement to buy anything it needs from American companies. The move, Biden argued, is meant to bolster the nation’s manufacturing industry at a time when the economy as a whole could use a boost.

Kevin Lyons, an associate professor of supply chain management at the Rutgers Business School, said that local and state level economic efforts bode well for buying domestically, as long as public officials and business executives coordinate their efforts. Lyons is involved with the 2020 “Buy Newark” initiative, under which businesses headquartered in the state’s largest city buy directly from Newark businesses.
Technically
Technically
Wilmington Alliance’s annual Yes, Wilmington! fundraiser on March 18 will, like most events, be virtual this year. With a focus on equitable economic mobility, three national speakers will be featured, discussing topics like community growth and revitalization, income security and wealth accumulation for all.

Lyneir Richardson, the executive director of the Rutgers Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development. He’s also the founder of Chicago TREND, a social enterprise that works with organizations seeking to better understand the trajectories of Chicago neighborhoods and invest in profitable retail projects that can drive transformative change.
Eyewitness News ABC 7
Eyewitness News ABC 7
Bill Ritter, "Tonight a look at a pandemic business trend that is rattling the pros on Wall Street. Amateur stock traders keeping busy while at home and taking some stocks to surprising heights. All of this to the 'say what?' of stockbrokers. Case in point: the computer store called GameStop the target of some amateur investors using Reddit to talk to each other and drive the stock up, despite the market blunders today. ABC7 reporter Darla Miles speaks with John Longo, Finance & Economics professor at Rutgers Business School."
Money Geek
Money Geek
How often should drivers get new car insurance quotes?

I would suggest reviewing your options annually, or perhaps every two to three years if you are happy with your current provider. In addition, if you ever file a claim, you will get a feel for what it is like to work with that particular firm. If you find the claim process to be unfair or a major hassle, it probably makes sense to look around.

What major factors should drivers consider when comparing car insurance quotes?

There are several factors to consider, with the most important being the cost, amount of coverage, and the timeliness and quality of the service.
Money Geek
Money Geek
Why should shoppers consider full coverage auto insurance over liability-only auto insurance?

If you have a newer car that is financed and you get in an accident that is your fault, it may result in a very expensive repair. If you have full coverage insurance, you will likely only be responsible for the deductible, which usually ranges from $250 to $1,000 per incident for most people.

What strategies can buyers use to find affordable full coverage insurance from a reputable provider?

It pays to shop around using various sites on the Internet. Most of the big insurance providers, such as GEICO, State Farm, Progressive, and Allstate, will also provide free insurance quotes. It is important to try to get an "apples to apples" quote since it is possible to get lower prices by having a higher deductible, lower cap, different coverage levels, and so forth.
Real Estate NJ
Real Estate NJ
The Center for Real Estate at Rutgers Business School has added a well-known title insurance professional to the team of industry leaders at the helm of its advisory board. Monica Casiello, director of marketing and business development at U.S. Title Solutions, joins the board’s executive committee alongside several developers, investors, and other commercial real estate influencers in New Jersey.

“Anyone that knows Monica knows that she is a driving force for real change and innovation for the real estate industry in New Jersey,” said Morris Davis, the Paul V. Profeta Chair of Real Estate and the center’s academic director. “Monica has been a strong supporter of the Center since it first began, participating on the Conferences and Events Committee and promoting the activities and programs of the Center to her expansive professional network.
Yahoo News
Yahoo News
This article originally appeared in Bloomberg.

Black paid Epstein $50 million in 2013, $70 million in 2014 and $30 million the following year. He made a $10 million donation to Gratitude America in October 2015, which was a charitable organization affiliated with Epstein.

That sort of compensation is unusual. Estate planning attorneys and tax advisers are typically paid by the hour or by the transaction. IRS regulations forbid tax practitioners from charging contingent fees “in connection with any matter before the Internal Revenue Service.”

But Epstein, with his atypical role and background, could avoid those rules, said Jay Soled, a Rutgers University professor who is also a practicing estate tax attorney. “This is a very unusual arrangement because he doesn’t really have training.”
Techio
Techio
As cashierless technology becomes normal, it could be used problematically for purposes beyond payment, particularly shoplifting detection.

Jerome Williams, a professor and senior administrator at Rutgers University’s Newark campus, told NBC that a theft-detection algorithm might wind up unfairly targeting people of color, who are routinely stopped on suspicion of shoplifting more often than white shoppers. A 2006 study of toy stores found that not only were middle-class white women often given preferential treatment, but also that the police were never called on them, even when their behavior was aggressive. And in a recent survey of Black shoppers published in the Journal of Consumer Culture, 80% of respondents reported experiencing racial stigma and stereotypes when shopping.

“The people who get caught for shoplifting is not an indication of who’s shoplifting,” Williams told NBC. In other words, Black shoppers who feel they’ve been scrutinized in stores might be more likely to appear nervous while shopping, which might be perceived by a system as suspicious behavior. “It’s a function of who’s being watched and who’s being caught, and that’s based on discriminatory practices.”
Courier
Courier
A scenario plan is a forward-looking document that’ll typically look at a couple of good – and not so good – scenarios for your business.
A comprehensive one will take time and money – and, yes, ‘futurists’ are available for hire – but small businesses can still put together a simple one with utility.

Lyneir Richardson is an instructor at Rutgers Business School and director of the institution’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development. Here he provides insight into the importance of planning ahead. "The economic climate is changing so rapidly – it’s important that small business owners do scenario planning to make reality-based assessments and predictions."
Paterson Times
Paterson Times
The Spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visited me. Decades after his death, he remains amused and yet humbled by all the fanfare of a national MLK holiday. At the time of his death in 1968, he was deeply unpopular. J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director, considered him the most dangerous man in America. Many whites opposed his campaign to obtain more rights and opportunities for Blacks. Most Americans viewed him negatively for one reason or another. On the one hand, his opposition to the Vietnam War and socialist proclivities – namely that the government should take care of those unable to fend for themselves — unsettled the populous. On the other hand, Blacks either questioned the legitimacy of his leadership as the principal voice for the Black community or they disapproved King’s nonviolent resistance and civil disobedience strategy.
MSN
MSN
By Jessica Remo | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

The boxes that arrive on my front porch, nearly daily, are reminders that I’m complicit.
I bought almost everything — paper towels, underwear, groceries, you name it — online.
I am the retail apocalypse, the death of brick-and-mortar. The retail apocalypse is me. And I’ve never felt much guilt about it. Until now.

As to whether in-person shopping is on its way out?

Not a chance, says Rutgers Business School Professor Stacy Schwartz. But it may begin to look different.

“I cringe when I hear the phrase ‘retail apocalypse,’ because I don’t think it’s dead,” says Schwartz. “In a time of normalcy, people like to go shopping.”
Jersey's Best
Jersey's Best
How does the business world fit into the fight for racial equality?

From Madam C.J. Walker — the world’s first self-made female millionaire of any race — to contemporary business titans, like Jay-Z and Merck’s CEO Ken Frazier, Black business leaders have not only built their companies despite formidable obstacles, but they’ve viewed their work as an essential component of the struggle for justice.

A virtual panel discussion with the producer and director, Stanley Nelson is moderated by Chike Uzoka, founder and CIO of the Newark-based Valentine Global.

Panelists:
Kai Campbell: launched his first restaurant concept, Burger Walla, in 2014.
Stanley Nelson: the filmmaker who created “Boss: The Black Experience in Business.”
Lyneir Richardson: the executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School.
Denise Woodard: Woodard is the founder and CEO of Partake, a line of allergy friendly snacks.
Business Because
Business Because
The Mini MBA: Business Essentials at Rutgers Business School in New Brunswick teaches students about the power of the consumer, the impact of globalization, and the pervasiveness of the digital era. The 12-week self-paced program has two cohorts entering in 2021, starting in February and May.

Peter Methot, director of Executive Education at Rutgers Business School, notes how their portfolio of Mini MBA programs is topping up business knowledge.

“In our digital marketing program, almost everyone that comes has an MBA—they just earned it before digital marketing was part of the curriculum,” Peter comments.
Market Screener
Market Screener
“Financial illiteracy is one of the driving forces behind income and wealth inequality. What better way to become financially literate, and ultimately financially independent, then to use a framework inspired by the greatest investor ever?” Professor John Longo says. Just released at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, Indie Bound, Indigo, and Waterstone’s, by John Wiley & Sons, “Buffett’s Tip’s: A Guide to Financial Literacy and Life” is co-authored by John Longo and his son, Tyler Longo.

The book was influenced by four trips Professor Longo took to Omaha with groups of Rutgers students for a personal visit with Warren Buffett, affectionately known as the “Oracle of Omaha.” In parallel, he was teaching his teenage son aspects of financial literacy, further leading to the book collaboration. For example, they opened financial accounts and products geared toward minors, such as a savings account, checking account, debit card, credit card, brokerage account, and 529 college savings plan.

“It is important to understand the financial concepts that drive the economy and one’s financial position. Examining these topics through the lens of Warren Buffett may maximize one’s chances for success,” says Tyler Longo.
Washington Post
Washington Post
Sephora’s plan to combat racial bias: Fewer security guards, more Black-owned brands and new protocols
Retail and crisis management experts say the initiative provides a comprehensive — and necessary — road map for the industry

Racism in retail, academics say, has become a persistent problem in an industry that relies heavily on personal interaction. More Black Americans — 24 percent — said they had been treated unfairly in a store within a 30-day period than at work, restaurants, bars, health-care settings or in police interactions, according to a Gallup poll conducted last summer.

“This has been a problem for many, many years because, let’s face it, individuals bring their own biases to work,” said Jerome Williams, a business professor at Rutgers University and author of “Race and Retail: Consumption Across the Color Line.” “To make progress, there are two areas that are critical: employee training and a strong commitment by upper management to treat all customers fairly, without making assumptions.”
New Jersey Stage
New Jersey Stage
How does the business world fit into the fight for racial equality? From Madam C.J. Walker — the world’s first self-made female millionaire of any race — to contemporary business titans like Jay-Z and Merck’s CEO Ken Frazier, Black business leaders have not only built their companies despite formidable obstacles, but they’ve viewed their work as an essential component of the struggle for justice.

In the next PSEG True Diversity Film screening at NJPAC, they will take a look at the long and inspiring history of Black business leadership and Black entrepreneurship, and how both have impacted the social justice movement.

Panelists include:

Lyneir Richardson: Lyneir is the Executive Director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CUEED) at Rutgers University, where he leads capacity-building programs that have assisted more than 450 local entrepreneurs.
STUKENT
STUKENT
ProfCon speaker Stacy Schwartz, assistant professor of professional practice and program director, MS digital marketing at Rutgers Business School, launched a new digital marketing program at her school. She discusses growing pains and other tips and tricks for developing and launching a new program in her speaking session titled “Lessons Learned: Launching a New Digital Marketing Program.”
World
World
The World and Everything in It is an Apple Podcasts top 100 News program delivering essential headlines, field reporting, interviews, and expert analysis every weekday.

Sarah Schweinsberg reports on the problems in the vaccine supply chain that are slowing the distribution of the shots. Xin (David) Ding specializes in healthcare supply chains and comments at 10:00.

Listen to the PodCast
ROI-NJ
ROI-NJ
On at least four occasions, Rutgers University students were the beneficiaries of some legendary financial acumen.

That’s a result of Rutgers Business School professor John Longo responding to the question of who might be a good mentor to teach local college students financial literacy with the answer: Warren Buffett.

And, after having his students meet with Buffett several times over the course of about 15 years, Longo is putting pen to paper on the insights he gleaned from the billionaire CEO of Berkshire Hathaway.

In November, Rutgers Business School announced it would be endeavoring to make its curriculum more accessible with a new format, called the Rutgers Stackable Business Innovation Program. It allows students to pick classes in an “a la carte” fashion, instead of committing to a standard, predefined two years of college courses for a degree.

Benjamin Melamed, a professor in the Department of Supply Chain Management at Rutgers Business School, is the program’s director. He said the current model simply isn’t flexible enough for some working professionals.
USA Today
USA Today
Nurse Kristen Cline was working a 12-hour shift in October at the Royal C. Johnson Veterans Memorial Hospital in Sioux Falls, South Dakota when a code blue rang through the halls. A patient in an isolation room was dying of a coronavirus that had raged for eight months across the country before it made the state the brightest red dot in a nation of hot spots.

Cline knew she needed to protect herself before entering the room, where a second COVID-19 patient was trembling under the covers, sobbing. She reached for the crinkled and dirty N95 mask she had reused for days.

Kevin Lyons, an associate professor and supply chain expert at Rutgers Business School, said nothing the VA did before or during the pandemic showed it had a handle on its own purchase and delivery of supplies, let alone prepare for a global shortage. His research is exploring how the Trump administration’s purge of hundreds of VA staff members created a path to disaster.
Smart Cities Dive
Smart Cities Dive
The logistics industry has seen a flurry of drone activity with UPS, Amazon Prime, Walmart and others working closely with the FAA. But widespread adoption for these operations has been precluded by the slow pace of regulation. New drone rules bring that future a little closer to reality.

Kevin Lyons, associate professor of supply chain management at Rutgers Business School, noted hurdles still remain. Many people and organizations see drones as a serious privacy issue, which can make the concept of home delivery via drone unappealing.

"Cameras on the drones need to be active at all times so the drones will be literally recording everything it sees," Lyons said in an email. "The ability to see into peoples houses, backyards, etc. is something that currently exists with satellites ... but the drones will be a visible intrusion to many people."
Daily Geek Show
Daily Geek Show
On average, you'll spend 19% more time doing your tasks and solve 22% fewer problems.

“The fact of consulting our smartphone during our breaks, between tasks, or during their completion, is an increasingly common phenomenon. This is why it seemed important to us to explore the consequences linked to the use of this device on the cognitive level. Many of us think that this is just another way to decompress, but it turns out that looking at our smartphone makes it harder to focus on work tasks again”, explains Terri Kurtzberg, co-author and associate professor of management and international business at Rutgers University.
NJ Tech Weekly
NJ Tech Weekly
At the end of each year, we publish a list of the 10 stories that most captured our readers’ interest over the course of that year. Our top story for 2020 referred to the themes of diversity and inclusion, which were so important to us all year long.

1. Black and Latino Angel Fund Backed by Rutgers Ready to Hear Entrepreneurs’ Pitches, June 19, by Esther Surden

It’s been a long journey, but the Black and Latino Angel Investment Fund of New Jersey is about to hear pitches from the first three entrepreneurs hoping for investment.

The fund, started by Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development at Rutgers Business School in Newark, has 10 angel investors and has raised $500,000 so far. The angels want to invest at the pre-seed level in companies headed by black and Latino founders in the Newark area. The fund continues to look for new angel investors to join on this journey.
ProPublica
ProPublica
While every American hospital was stretched by the pandemic, the VA’s lack of an effective system for tracking and delivering supplies made it particularly vulnerable, according to a recent examination by the federal Government Accountability Office.

As COVID-19 overwhelmed the antiquated system, VA leadership asked employees at more than 170 hospitals to enter inventory by hand into spreadsheets every day and did “not have insight” into how resources were being deployed, the report said.

Kevin Lyons, an associate professor and supply chain expert at Rutgers Business School, said nothing the VA did before or during the pandemic showed it had a handle on its own purchase and delivery of supplies, let alone prepare for a global shortage. His research is exploring how the Trump administration’s purge of hundreds of VA staff members created a path to disaster.

Lyons, an Air Force veteran, told me top VA officials have been able to claim all’s well — even as nurses and doctors describe continued shortages and rationing — because bureaucrats who awarded contracts did little or nothing to track how they worked out. He said the rapid-fire approval of contracts gave “the appearance that we’re doing something. But there was no connection between the nurses and the doctors who actually need it.”

“All they really care about is, you know, signing a contract, and then crossing your fingers and hoping that stuff comes,” Lyons said. “And that’s just not the way that supply chain is supposed to happen.”
Accessibility News International
Accessibility News International
“Job interviews are challenging for everyone, but particularly so for people with disabilities who have always had difficulties presenting themselves favorably to gain employment,” said Rutgers Business School professor Mason Ameri.

“People with disabilities encounter an implicit bias that they will not be as productive as their non-disabled peers,” said Ameri, who co-authored the study. “Knowing how to navigate the conversation with potential employers is critical for leveling the playing field.”
KYW Newsradio
KYW Newsradio
This holiday season is shaping up to be quite different for many of us. One marketing professor said the pandemic has created new trends that will probably stick around for a while.

Rutgers Business School marketing professor Ashwani Monga said the new routines created by the COVID-19 pandemic are reflected this holiday season.

"I've created new habits. So now I do my shopping online. I may spend more time with my family on weekends even after COVID is long gone. Some of these habits are going to stay with us,” Monga explained.

Monga said it might be bad news for brick-and-mortar stores but not necessarily for the economy because of online shopping. But he added this trend is a mixed bag.

"You have one segment that's saving a lot of money right now, they are going to have a lot of discretionary income to spend more and we have the other group of people who are unemployed,” Monga said.

Listen: KYW Newsradio Audio On-Demand, 1:11
MSNBC
MSNBC
From children’s books, to cartoons, to the worlds of fantasy and make believe, it can sometimes seem as if Black characters are on the side-lines, or don’t exist at all. Especially around the holidays, Black parents get creative to find toys for their kids that reflect just how beautiful and special they are.

More than three decades ago, Yla Eason took matters into her own hands when her Black son said that he couldn’t be a superhero because he’s not white. Trymaine Lee talks to Yla, about why she created Sun-Man, one of the first Black superhero toys in America, and the challenges she encountered along the way.

Listen to the Podcast, or read the transcript.
Fast Company
Fast Company
“A lot of times, consumers do this through consumption,” explains Kristina Durante, a Rutgers University social psychologist. “It gives you more peace of mind and allaying feelings of internal conflict. Consumer products that we buy make us feel good. They make us feel good, because at least, I can make some sort of decision about where my life is headed. It’s some sense of autonomy. I’ll buy a new tree or some decoration for outside. It restores a sense of peace, because it restores control sense of control.”
USA Today
USA Today
Many have been shocked by the silence — and even support — of so many elected members of the GOP in response to Trump’s increasingly outlandish claims. But their behavior isn’t at all surprising to social psychologists: It’s a perfect demonstration of how toxic environments grow gradually, as problematic behavior starts with something small that then continues and expands.

What can we do to avoid following in the footsteps of so many in the Republican Party in our own personal and professional lives?

First, increase self-awareness.

Another subtle strategy for pushing people toward ethical behavior is to ask people to reflect on a time when they did not behave honorably and which they now regret. Research by Ayelet Fishbach at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Oliver Sheldon at Rutgers Business School demonstrates that asking people to reflect on their own bad behavior in the past reduces their willingness to do so again. Why? This step at least pushes us to think about the choice we are making, before we head down that slippery slope.
Fast Company
Fast Company
The COVID-19 pandemic has inspired a plethora of freshly coined words. From maskie to quarantini, 2020 is chock-full of new entries for our collective vocabularies.

“Necessity is the mother of invention. That’s what’s happening here,” explains Ashwani Monga, a Rutgers Business School professor of marketing. “For the retail industry, they were under the onslaught of online, but it was happening gradually, not a big flood. What we have is like a 100-year flood, which changes people and generations moving forward.”
Rutgers Today
Rutgers Today
Rutgers expert shares how financial literacy can make an impact.

The road to financial literacy – and ultimately financial independence – is a long one. Embarking on this journey requires the right mindset and desire to improve continuously, according to John Longo, a professor of professional practice at Rutgers Business School–Newark and New Brunswick and chief investment officer at Beacon Trust, a $3 billion investment advisory firm.
The Buttonwood Tree
The Buttonwood Tree
The company hired Goldman Sachs Group Inc and JPMorgan Chase & Co to lead the IPO preparations. Despite an obvious decline in hiring and job postings due to the global pandemic, ZipRecruiter is looking to capitalize on the IPO market for technology startups.

The Future of the Market

While the market has hit record highs this year, it is unknown if the success will continue. Especially with a new administration taking over in Washington D.C., market regulations and taxation will change soon. Michael Barnett, Professor of Management & Global Business at Rutgers Business School, told The Buttonwood Tree, “Regarding market predictions, I treat the market as basically a legal form of gambling. I think the market will rise as COVID clears, but it’ll be offset by the need for government regulation and taxation to take care of many of the problems associated with the last four years, as well as many lingering issues decades in the making. Perhaps a wash or a decline overall as a result.”
Yahoo News
Yahoo News
Many have been shocked by the silence — and even support — of so many elected members of the GOP in response to Trump’s increasingly outlandish claims. But their behavior isn’t at all surprising to social psychologists: It’s a perfect demonstration of how toxic environments grow gradually, as problematic behavior starts with something small that then continues and expands.

What can we do to avoid following in the footsteps of so many in the Republican Party in our own personal and professional lives?

First, increase self-awareness.

Another subtle strategy for pushing people toward ethical behavior is to ask people to reflect on a time when they did not behave honorably and which they now regret. Research by Ayelet Fishbach at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and Oliver Sheldon at Rutgers Business School demonstrates that asking people to reflect on their own bad behavior in the past reduces their willingness to do so again. Why? This step at least pushes us to think about the choice we are making, before we head down that slippery slope.
Bloomberg
Bloomberg
On this episode of "Bloomberg Equality," Lisa Kaplowitz, finance professor at Rutgers University and the co-founder and executive director of the Rutgers Center for Women in Business, looks at how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting women in the financial-services industry. She speaks with Bloomberg's Haidi Stroud-Watts and Shery Ahn. Watch video.
Chicago Tribune
Chicago Tribune
As they raced to develop vaccines against COVID-19, executives at some pharmaceutical companies collected huge windfalls by selling stock around the time their companies announced positive news about the vaccines.

John Longo, a professor at Rutgers Business School and chief investment officer and portfolio manager at Beacon Trust, said 10b5-1 plans were a very common and legal way for executives to diversify their holdings. He cautioned, though, that selling a majority of one’s stock in a single day — as Pfizer’s CEO did — warranted more scrutiny.

“That raises more concerns,” he said, “because you would like to see the selling spread across several months. You would like to see 25% or less of someone’s shares sold.”
NJ.com
NJ.com
“We’ve been living life so differently these past eight months, we’re completely different people than we were in February,” Ashwani Monga, marketing professor and executive vice chancellor of Rutgers University-Newark, said in a story in The Star-Ledger last month, when discussing the prospect of Black Friday.
INSEAD Knowledge
INSEAD Knowledge
The admonition to “Put your phone away!” while attending an event is universal.
Yet people persist in texting or posting on social media during experiences of every variety.

Are all these people really undermining their own enjoyment? And is it really the case that generating content during experiences is necessarily detrimental?

Our recent work indicates that these assumptions may not reflect how most consumers actually generate content during experiences. The concerns so regularly expressed by the popular media may be greatly overstated.

In our paper, “Generating Content Increases Enjoyment by Immersing Consumers and Accelerating Perceived Time”, published in the Journal of Marketing, Gabriela Tonietto (Rutgers Business School) and I [Alixandra Barasch is a Visiting Associate Professor of Marketing at INSEAD. She is also an Assistant Professor of Marketing at NYU Stern School of Business] found that those who generate relevant content during an experience enjoy it more than those who don’t.
Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
As they raced to develop vaccines against COVID-19, executives at some pharmaceutical companies received huge paydays by selling shares around the time their companies announced positive news about the vaccines.

Such well-timed sales, which occur frequently in the healthcare industry, are highlighted in a new study released Monday that illustrates how executives use prearranged stock sale plans to unload shares on days when their companies release good news. The practice raises thorny questions about whether the trades sometimes cross the line.

Representatives for Pfizer and Moderna defended the stock sales, saying they were executed according to predetermined schedules, known as 10b5-1 plans, that allow executives to plan out future trades. The plans, named for a Securities and Exchange Commission rule created in 2000, are meant to be a way for executives to sell stock while avoiding allegations of illegal insider trading.

John Longo, a professor at Rutgers Business School and chief investment officer and portfolio manager at Beacon Trust, said 10b5-1 plans were a very common and legal way for executives to diversify their holdings. He cautioned, though, that selling a majority of one’s stock in a single day — as Pfizer’s CEO did — warranted more scrutiny.

“That raises more concerns,” he said, “because you would like to see the selling spread across several months. You would like to see 25% or less of someone’s shares sold.”
Business Tech Africa
Business Tech Africa
It’s no exaggeration to say that the pandemic has decimated small businesses and early-stage ventures, especially those owned by women and people of color. Black women sit at this juncture, bearing a disproportionate share of the virus’ impact.

“Hair salons, catering, restaurants or anything related to events . . . all of that shut down, and so the success of business owners in those industries depends on how much they have in reserves or were able to get from the federal government—both of which pose challenges for Black entrepreneurs,” says Jeffrey Robinson, founding assistant director of The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers Business School.
ROI-NJ
ROI-NJ
It’s time to pivot — as we all know by now. But good business advice for small and midsized companies doesn’t end there.

That’s something those who spoke at the virtual symposium held Thursday by Rutgers Business School made clear.

Lei Lei, dean of the Rutgers Business School, led off her organization’s annual Business Community Engagement Symposium. The event has been held in-person for the past four years and has featured speakers such as Newark Mayor Ras Baraka.

Even with it being presented in the form of a Zoom call this year, the Rutgers dean said she felt it was important to continue to share pressing business issues and to promote collaboration in the local economy — and “COVID will never stop” her academic institution from doing that.