Media Coverage

Paterson Times
Paterson Times
The Civil Rights Movement was made up of a broad coalition of civic groups, student activists, labor and religious organizations. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who advocated non-violent protest was the symbolic leader — its primary spokesperson – the face of the movement. The Movement advocated for the end to racial discrimination in state and federal laws. Its efforts resulted in, among other things, the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1963, the most comprehensive civil rights measure ever passed and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Dr. King and the movement’s impact on the nation ’s conscience is without parallel. It is little wonder that a federal holiday honoring Dr. King was first proposed four days after his assassination in 1968.

The establishment of Martin Luther King’s birthday as a national holiday did not happen immediately or easily; it required sustained herculean efforts.
CopyLine Magazine
CopyLine Magazine
Lyneir Richardson, Rutgers-Newark CUEED Executive Director expressed, “Our intention in collaborating with ArtUp is to elevate creative people who operate in media, art and entertainment industries in Memphis. We aim to help creatives, (especially people of color) to become stronger entrepreneurs and property owners.”

The Memphis Business Hub for Creatives Program is modeled on the success of the Newark Business Hub, established by Rutgers Business School CUEED in 2016.

Says Richardson, “In Newark, creatives are participating in noteworthy business ventures. They are at the forefront of inclusive equitable economic growth initiatives and are working to own property. We expect the participants in the Memphis Hub program to do the same.”
Tech on Medium
Tech on Medium
Online disinformation is a complex problem that requires complex solutions to address it. However, a large portion of the current tools meant to combat disinformation are relatively simple and feature basic elements like “dislikes” or “likes”.

Our new tool, Proof, addresses this problem. Proof incorporates complex economic and financial methodologies to provide a platform where anyone can vote on the accuracy of online content. I founded Proof with Christopher Young, an assistant professor at Rutgers Business School. Proof uses a proprietary algorithm based on the principals of the ‘wisdom of crowds’ theory, contract theory, and the sharing economy to create an engaging, fair and scalable solution to fight disinformation.
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
Political and technological issues will buffet the financial services industry in 2020

Arthur Guarino, an associate professor of Professional Practice in the Department of Finance and Economics at Rutgers Business School, identified cybercurrency as an emerging banking concern. “The banking industry will eventually need to adapt to the use of bitcoin since more of its customers will make the switch,” he said. “Old-fashioned cash will still be used by many of a bank’s customers, but others will start asking for or demanding bitcoin in order to perform certain business or personal transactions.”
NJ.com, True New Jersey
NJ.com
They had the viral content for their start-up tech company, PeduL, which connects college students with scholarships.

But Kayla Michele and Chisa Egbelu, two Rutgers graduates, needed funding after leaving their production assistant gigs at NBC in 2017.

“We needed to be introduced to the world of venture capital and what that looks like," Michele said. “We didn’t know nothing about the world of venture capital."


The door swung wide open for the young minority entrepreneurs - she’s 24, he’s 26 – when they signed up with The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUEED), a program of Rutgers Business School that was formed in Newark to help small businesses in the city, spur economic development and target urban business owners.

CUEED’s executive director, Lyneir Richardson, had the Newark based company enroll in one of its programs – the Black and Latino Tech Initiative - which showed the pair how to raise money and build their brand.
AIB
AIB
The 2020-2023 Executive Board Election Results Are In!
Thank you to all of our members who cast their votes!
Now, along with the current AIB Executive Board and the AIB Secretariat, please join us in congratulating the following officers, whose terms will officially run from August 1, 2020 to July 31, 2023.
President-Elect: Farok Contractor
Vice President Program-Elect: Andrew Delios
Vice President Administration-Elect: Dana Minbaeva
The Epoch Times
The Epoch Times
Finding balance between the benefits of staying connected and being distracted by our devices can be tricky.

Consider the 2,600 times we touch our phones every day, our panic when we temporarily misplace a device, the experience of “phantom vibration syndrome” and how merely seeing a message alert can be as distracting as checking the message itself.

So how do we avoid the potential pitfalls while still reaping the benefits?
Forbes
Forbes
Lyneir Richardson is a man with a mission. He is executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development at Rutgers University in Newark, N.J., which has set a goal of helping 1,000 urban entrepreneurs grow their businesses through a nine-month program it runs. The program, which raised $110,000 in funding at an event in October, has enrolled about 400 entrepreneurs so far.
Forbes
Forbes
As packages full of toys crisscross the globe this holiday season, FedEx couriers are toting hundreds of fully cooked $20 turkeys to New York State’s 50 correctional facilities. They’re the most popular item people are sending to their incarcerated loved ones using the ordering platform Emma’s Premium Services.

Founder Anton Kogan, 32, saw a need during his eight years behind bars and created the website and app to allow inmates’ families to effortlessly send fresh food, clothing and electronics to a population that subsists on canned goods, as he puts it. Come May, the Russian immigrant plans to have completed an M.B.A. from Rutgers University while working toward $1 million in 2020 sales.
World Economic Forum
World Economic Forum
Nowadays, trust is disconcertingly low. Hollywood has been upended by the #MeToo movement and the fall of Harvey Weinstein; from Fox News to Facebook, the media is under fire for fake news and filter bubbles; and the rise of Trump, Brexit and other nationalist movements are highlighting political polarization. They may seem like unrelated issues but all are part of a larger undercurrent.

Researchers have pointed to the important role trust plays in the health of democracy. Trust has been identified as a crucial component of “political orientation” – a willingness to engage in the political process. Historically, it has been high in stable democracies. Research shows a link between democracy and trust, one that is also interconnected with life satisfaction.
Belfort Group
Belfort Group
Peter Methot, Associate Dean, Executive Education at Rutgers Business School

“I predict that the macro trend in executive and professional education for 2020 and beyond is the shift to meet a wider and deeper need of continuous learning (or, Lifelong Learning). For decades, we have seen the divide between formal learning in degrees earned through undergraduate and graduate programs and the informal experiences gained through non-degree certificate programs. But with the pace of change and the need for learners to manage continuous learning throughout their careers, the stacking and integration of these opportunities is being thrust on educational partners to be more learner-centric and build ecosystems of relevant learning to support their various career journeys.
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
The editors of NJBIZ ranked New Jersey's 50 most powerful people in Manufacturing in New Jersey. With an aim to "identify the people impacting business in New Jersey in a positive way," NJBIZ editors looked at heads of companies and organizations, legislators, educators and other leaders around the state to find those with "impressive track records of affecting change" and who are fostering growth in the manufacturing sector.

Kevin Lyons is an associate professor in the Supply Chain Management Department and director of Public Private Community Partnerships at Rutgers Business School. His research includes the integration of sustainable development and diversity criteria into local and global supply chain management and manufacturing systems, processes and operations.
Crain's
Crain's
Finalists on the South and West sides were announced today for a prize from a foundation headed by Penny Pritzker and her husband, Bryan Traubert.

What the finalists had in common was that they “had enough ambition to be exciting but enough meat on the bone to be real and not just dreaming,” Lyneir Richardson, one of 67 people who served as expert reviewers of the proposals, told Crain’s ahead of the announcement. Richardson, CEO of Chicago Trend, neighborhood-based retail development effort funded by the MacArthur Foundation, heads the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development at Rutgers Business School in New Jersey.
Womens Radio
Womens Radio
Women’s Wealth: The Middle Way® Presents
Building Strong Women Leaders with Sangeeta Rao

Sangeeta Rao, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Student Mentoring Programs at Rutgers University, is passionate about empowering women. Sangeeta oversees Women BUILD, a leadership program designed to give high achieving, talented women undergraduates at Rutgers Business School the opportunity to reach their full leadership potential as business students. She also co-leads a new Women’s Initiative at Rutgers Business School that seeks to build stronger connections between students, faculty, alumni, and corporations with a goal of addressing systemic gender biases in business. Join us as Sangeeta shares what mentorship means to her and the personal effect that Women BUILD has had on her life and career.

Join us every other week on Women’s Wealth: The Middle Way®, a radio show aimed at helping women navigate questions about work, money, and family. You can find us on your favorite podcast app, including Libsyn, Soundcloud, Podbean, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts.
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
Pharmaceutical companies face economic and political challenges in 2020

Consumers are frustrated over high drug prices, but the real problem isn’t necessarily greedy pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, insurers, or pharmacy benefit managers, said Gary Branning, an assistant professor of Professional Practice at Rutgers Business School. Instead, he argues, “it’s misaligned incentives.” “The central challenge facing the U.S. health care system is the motivation of stakeholders to earn a profit, as a result of the misaligned incentives among health care stakeholders,” Branning — who’s also president of Managed Market Resources, a health care consulting and medical communications company — wrote in an article for Am Health Drug Benefits, a trade publication. “Each stakeholder has different profit motivations that drive up the overall costs of health care.”
Inverse
Inverse
One of the topics Gabriela Tonietto, an assistant professor of marketing at Rutgers Business School, researches is leisure. What we can do to make that time more enjoyable, and what happens when we push aside leisure time in an attempt to be more productive?

There’s a saying — you study what you’re not good at. I don’t know if that is accurate for me, but it is something that we all struggle with. That’s especially true if you’re a woman and there’s plenty of research to show that. I became interested in what are the strategies to be better at leisure, and in the questions of: Should we be happier? And if yes, why aren’t we?
MSN
MSN
Rutgers University management professor Oliver Sheldon, who has studied unethical behaviour, says there are different theories that could explain why parents, with seemingly all the advantages of the world, might behave this way.

Sheldon cited a 2012 joint study by researchers at UC Berkeley and the University of Toronto that found upper-class individuals behave more unethically than those in lower classes.
Wallet Hub
Wallet Hub
What are the best ways to use a business credit card?

A helpful way to answer these questions is to talk about what are not the best ways to use a business credit card. Businesses often get into trouble because they use credit cards, which are good sources of short-term liquidity, for long-term financing; that is, to finance the purchase of assets or services for which the firm will have to carry the associated credit card balance in full for a long time. Credit cards have built-in clauses; for example, the bank can lower the line of credit at any time, raise the interest rate, or even demand immediate payment of the entire balance if the borrower misses a few payments. This means that the inappropriate use of credit cards can expose the user to refinancing risk. A useful rule of thumb is to use credit cards for purchases for which you will be able to pay off the credit card balance in a reasonably short time.

Ben Sopranzetti, Ph.D., Professor of Finance, Vice Chair, Department of Finance and Economics – Rutgers Business School
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
Investigate the local scene before going international.

An organization called Transparency International publishes a corruption index each year ranking 180 countries and territories on a scale of one to 100, with one being very corrupt, said Denis Hamilton, an assistant professor of professional practice at Rutgers Business School. “Based on the scores reported in that index, the most corrupt countries as of 2018 are in Africa or the Middle East — eight of the top 10 — and include countries such as Somalia, Syria, South Sudan, and Yemen,” he said. “I would consider it considerably risky to do business in any of these countries not only because of the corruption but from a personal safety standpoint as well. At the same time, not all countries in this region have poor scores in this index so it would not be appropriate to assume that doing business in that region altogether would be unwise.”
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
Why businesses should develop a checklist for going global.

Businesses of just about any size may benefit by adding overseas sales, according to experts, who suggest thinking of the move as a kind of counterweight — if domestic sales slow down, other countries may be able to take up the slack.

It’s also useful to consider political, economic and legal issues before venturing onto the global landscape, said Denis Hamilton, an assistant professor of professional practice at Rutgers Business School, and a former vice president at Johnson & Johnson.
NJ.com, True New Jersey
NJ.com
Marc Kalan, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School, said that Toys 'R' Us is attempting to find a niche.

“They’re creating an experiential-type place. A place where they’re inviting their former customers to come and experience toys, which is something that you can’t do with traditional outlets or online," Kalan told NJ Advance Media on Tuesday.
Forbes
Forbes
In a recent article in Tax Notes Federal, Dan Palmon and Jay Soled, both professors at Rutgers Business School, proposed a corporate wealth tax that would supplement the existing corporate income tax. The impetus for their plan is less about income inequality, per se, and more about providing a meaningful backstop to how we currently tax corporate profits.

As Palmon and Soled see it, the need for a corporate wealth tax is born out of concern that many of the most successful corporations pay little income tax relative to the huge profits they boast about.
NJ.com
NJ.com
The loss of a community bank can negatively affect some of the “culture and connection between folks in the neighborhood" said Lyneir Richardson, assistant professor at Rutgers Business School in Newark and executive director for the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development.

But he stressed that “community banks... need to catch up to the current business model to survive.”
Bicycling
Bicycling
Checking your phone in the middle of an important task can decrease your ability to resume it successfully.

“We suspect—but haven’t yet shown definitively—that because we use our phones for so many things, many of which are addictive in their own right, seeing your phone at all sends your mind down many other pathways and makes it harder to shift back into whatever you were trying to focus on previously,” study coauthor Terri Kurtzberg, Ph.D., associate professor of management and global business at Rutgers’ Business School, told Bicycling.
Value Walk
Value Walk
Utah State University research showing that minority and women applicants seeking small business loans receive poorer treatment and more scrutiny from bank lending officers was presented at a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) symposium on Nov. 6, in Washington, D.C.

Done in partnership with the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC), Bone and his colleagues, which include Jerome Williams of Rutgers University and Glenn Christensen of Brigham Young University, have studied 10 years of data on the financial lending landscape for minorities and women. The research, which has been published in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing and Journal of Consumer Research, was also presented in written and oral testimony in a congressional hearing of the U.S. House of Representatives’ Financial Services Committee in September.
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
Carl Goldberg is the founder and managing member of Canoe Brook Associates, a family-owned real estate consulting and development company in Roseland. The firm run by the former founding partners of Roseland Property Co. Since the inception of Roseland, Goldberg has been responsible for securing the entitlements for the development of communities throughout the Northeast with a special emphasis on urban waterfront development.

He currently serves as chairman of the New Jersey Builders Association Political Action Committee and as co-chair of the Center for Real Estate Studies at Rutgers Business School.
Chalkbeat
Chalkbeat
Two Newark high schools launched career-focused “academies” this week, bringing Superintendent Roger León closer to his vision of revitalizing the district’s traditional high schools and preparing students for college and careers.

Part of the developing curriculum features partnerships with local businesses and competitions for student to pitch their own business ideas for startup money, said John Impellizzeri, a retired Rutgers Business School professor with decades of experience in supply chain management.

Impellizzeri advises the academy and believes in the program’s power to attract more students to combat West Side’s declining enrollment and develop top talent.

“Give this a chance and it’s going to become an amazing place for young people and to cultivate not just the next generation of RBS students,” he said. “But the future CEOs, CFOs, and entrepreneurs of this world will come out of West Side High School. I can promise you that.”
Urban Land Institute
Urban Land Institute
The panel will be chaired by leading Urban Land Institute member Lyneir Richardson, executive director, Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Rutgers Business School, Newark, New Jersey. “We look forward to learning more about Shaw’s real estate assets, understanding the market dynamics in Raleigh and providing strategic advice to leadership at the university,” said Richardson. “The fact that Shaw is an historically black college and university, and located in a Federal Opportunity Zone, gives this work national importance at this pivotal moment.”
Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank
What should you do when it’s not possible to reduce the cost of raw materials or find new trading partners? “[Small businesses are often] dealing with the supply chain asking for higher costs that cannot be quickly passed on to customers. It means more time thinking about pricing, renegotiating and managing cash flow," says Lyneir Richardson, executive director of the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development at Rutgers Business School.
Berdon, LLC Press Release
Berdon, LLC Press Release
Top 40 CPA and Advisory firm Berdon LLP and Rutgers Continuous Auditing and Reporting Lab (CAR Lab) have partnered to find ways to streamline and automate the complex process of real estate company audits.

“This project aims to create a new approach to real estate assurance.” says Dr. Miklos Vasarhelyi, the director of the CAR Lab, “Auditing methodology is anachronistic and needs to be updated to not only serve as a method of assurance but also to help clients to improve their operations. Sampling and traditional risk assessment are outdated in the world of advanced analytics, AI, and big exogenous data.”
ROI
ROI
“Rutgers’ Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development has spent a decade fostering opportunities for entrepreneurs of all races,” Jeffrey Robinson, an associate professor and academic director at CUEED, said in a statement. “Racial disparities among entrepreneurs are very real and all too frequent, and it is impressive to see the Murphy administration addressing the critical issue of closing this divide.”
Financial Times
Financial Times
Best practice examples of sustainability, ethics and social purpose

Student projects

RBS was among nine U.S. schools (UC Berkeley, Wharton, Columbia, North Carolina State University, Rutgers, etc.) recognized in the Student Projects category. All submissions were assessed by a panel of expert judges.

The RBS Connect, Engage, and Opportunity Network links organizations with students to develop their talents and skills, and offers those from under-represented and underserved backgrounds opportunities in leadership and professional development. Women BUILD enrolls high-achieving undergraduate women for classes, mentoring and self-development.
ProPublica
ProPublica
Documents obtained by ProPublica show stark differences in how Donald Trump’s businesses reported some expenses, profits and occupancy figures for two Manhattan buildings, giving a lender different figures than they provided to New York City tax authorities. The discrepancies made the buildings appear more profitable to the lender — and less profitable to the officials who set the buildings’ property tax.

The 40 Wall Street documents contain discrepancies related to costs as well as to occupancy. Generally, there are “more opportunities to play games on the expense side,” said Ron Shapiro, an assistant professor at Rutgers Business School and a former bank senior vice president, “particularly because there are many more kinds of expenses.”
NJ.com
NJ.com
For years, many corporations have abdicated their civic duties and have paid little or no tax. There are several reasons for this phenomenon: globalization enables corporations to assign profits to low-tax offshore jurisdictions; the Tax Code provides robust write-offs for capital expenditures; and adroit advisors devise clever strategies that enable corporations to navigate around otherwise onerous tax burdens. The combination of these factors has greatly eroded the corporate tax base.
Worcester Business Journal
Worcester Business Journal
Tariffs – also known as import duties – are taxes levied when products are shipped from one country into another. Tariff increases on Chinese goods have been in the news lately; U.S. companies using imported materials are impacted via their supply chains. How can businesses, especially smaller ones, handle the effects?

Know your pricing, Lyneir Richardson of Rutgers Business School tells BusinessNewsDaily.com. Business owners should be aware what costs cannot be absorbed and if any expenses can be reduced to offset tariff hikes. “Raising prices is a dangerous game … Sometimes a price hike might be necessary to stay profitable when suppliers increase the cost of doing business, but it could keep customers away, damaging revenue,” he notes. Richardson advises business owners research how their prices compare with the market average.
The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
Opinion Letters
Regarding your editorial “King Warren of the Roundtable” (Oct. 7):

Prof. Mark Castelino
Rutgers Business School
Newark, N.J.

Sen. Warren’s plan is the latest iteration of a progressive scheme for a state-administered economic system of socially just, sustainable, stakeholder-accountable capitalism that, in effect, neuters unfair market capitalism. After Barack Obama won the 2008 election, former Vice President Al Gore and David Blood wrote that “We Need Sustainable Capitalism” (op-ed, Nov. 5, 2008) to tackle three interrelated crises which must be solved together: the 2008 recession, energy insecurity and an overarching climate crisis. Messrs. Gore and Blood returned three years later with “A Manifesto for Sustainable Capitalism” (op-ed, Dec. 14, 2011), arguing that America needed a new sustainable investment-value chain that “transcends borders, industries, asset classes and stakeholders.”
Tap into West Essex
Tap into West Essex
Commander Brian Gallagher of the Fairfield VFW recently hosted it's first Suits for Soldiers event, where veterans received gently used suits donated by Pio Costa and Associates and assistance from professionals who were on hand to help them with personal branding, resumes, money management and more.

On hand to assist the veterans with personal branding was Margaret O'Donnell, Manager of Military and Veteran Engagement Programs at Rutgers Business School.
East Asia Forum
East Asia Forum
Authors: James Riedel, Johns Hopkins, and Markus Taussig, Rutgers Business School

There are growing fears that the US–China trade war will spread to Vietnam. A logical way to approach the issue would be to start by examining the logic behind the US–China trade war and then assessing whether the same logic could lead to a US–Vietnam trade war. The problem with this approach is that the US–China trade war defies economic logic.
The Progress
The Progress
Margaret O’Donnell, manager of military and veteran engagement programs at Rutgers Business School, met veterans at the post to advise them about personal branding. She talked about how their interactions on social media make them better job candidates and how to use online services, such as LinkedIn.

O’Donnell works with student veterans and other veterans starting at the pre-admissions stage, when they first express interest in attending college.

“Even the fact that I advertised on social media that I was going to be here caught the interest of a few veterans,” she said.
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ
Financing stadium construction can be a risky bet for cities

The Patriots — and by extension, the county’s investment — are doing well now, “but can they continue it?” wondered Arthur Guarino, an associate professor of Professional Practice at Rutgers Business School Newark and New Brunswick. In general, he’s not thrilled about government getting involved with sports teams. “It’s a bad idea because a municipality or state will often pay a substantial amount of the cost to build a stadium, and then the team may move away, like the way the San Diego Chargers moved to Los Angeles. A contract may try to prevent this, but if a team has a good lawyer, they may be able to find a loophole.”
CEO Magazine
CEO Magazine
Grab your smartphone for a second. Now open all the apps and windows and log yourself out. Proceed to delete the number of your ex and in-laws. The next part is the most important: place the top left corner of your phone between your thumb and index finger, carefully hover it over a flaming trash can and let it go. Step back from the trash can, turn around and walk away.

Congratulations, you’re now roughly 20% smarter. Okay, we didn’t have to be so dramatic but that’s essentially the summary of a recent study which found picking up your phone whilst engaging in mentally challenging tasks was detrimental to your brain’s mental performance. More specifically the distracting act of using a smartphone mid-task was found to handicap the brain’s ability to recharge.

“Cellphones may have this affect because even just seeing your phone activates thoughts of checking messages, connecting with people, access to ever-refilling information and more, in ways that are different than how we use other screens like computers, and laptops,” explains Terri Kurtzberg, the study’s co-author and associate professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School.
NJBIZ
NJBIZ
At one time, supply chain management systems were so expensive that only large companies could afford them, said Rudi Leuschner, an associate professor in the department of Supply Chain Management at Rutgers Business School. He’s also the program director for the university’s online Master of Science in Supply Chain Management program.

“Today, they’re still not cheap, but they are more affordable,” he said. “It’s important to design your supply chain to be flexible, since the movement of goods is always changing. In the 1960s, for example, many products were manufactured in the Midwest and were then shipped to both coasts. Today, of course, many of them are manufactured in Asia and are shipped globally. Now there’s also a shift to Mexico. Things keep changing and companies have to be able to adapt to that.”

See A Supply Chain Case Study summary of undergraduate experiential learning.
Rutgers Today
Rutgers Today
The next time you’re trying to drive home a point or make a convincing pitch, adjusting the tone of your voice could help.

In a new paper titled “How the Voice Persuades,” Rutgers Business School professor Alex Van Zant and Jonah Berger, a professor at the Wharton School of Business, provide evidence that how a person says something, especially if it works to make them appear more confident, may make their words more convincing.

The paper will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. It is currently available online through the American Psychological Association’s PsycNET.
QS TOPMBA
QS TOPMBA
The Global MBA Rankings 2020 highlight the best MBA programs across the world. We ranked 240 programs this year, and many more were analyzed. Data was collected in early 2019, using three surveys; the QS Global Employer Survey, the QS Global Academic Survey and a survey completed by the business schools themselves.

The survey completed by schools covered quantitative indicators such as the salary of graduates, class profile etc. For the purpose of the Global MBA Rankings 2020, QS did not ask schools to survey their alumni. Instead, schools provided career progression information on their alumni to MBACSEA compliant standards.

QS Global MBA Rankings 2019 Breakdown
Employability – 40%
Entrepreneurship and Alumni Outcomes – 15%
Return on Investment – 20%
Thought Leadership – 15%
Class & Faculty Diversity – 10%
The Daily Targum
The Daily Targum
University President Robert L. Barchi announced yesterday the creation of the President’s Task Force on Carbon Neutrality and Carbon Resilience, which has been charged with the mission of developing a comprehensive climate action plan for the University to consider.

The task force will be co-chaired by Robert Kopp, a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science and director of the Institute of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, and Kevin Lyons, an associate professor of professional practices at Rutgers Business School in both Newark and New Brunswick and an associate director of the Rutgers Energy Institute.
business.com
business.com
Would Medicare for All reduce the expenses associated with providing health insurance for employees? Or would tax increases required to fund such a program put a strain on small business owners?

"Medicare for All is pretty much what it says it is," said Gary Branning, assistant professor of professional practice at the Rutgers Business School. "It's universal coverage driven through the Medicare process."

It is difficult to answer the question of how, exactly, Medicare for All would impact small businesses. The primary challenge, of course, lies in the fact that Medicare for All has not been implemented.
NJBIZ, All Business, All New Jersey
NJBIZ
“Since 2008, CUEED has provided education, mentorship, networking, and investment opportunities for over 400 entrepreneurs whose businesses have created over 580 jobs and generated over $167 million in annual revenue,” Lyneir Richardson, executive director of CUEED, said in a statement. “In the same way that our entrepreneurs have found original ways to revitalize their communities and build their companies, the UnGala Experience will flip the script on typical gala events by presenting an evening that’s fresh, dynamic, and innovative.”
Rutgers University - Newark
Rutgers University - Newark
“We are delighted to host the “17 Rooms-U” event at Rutgers. Given our strong track record of engaging faculty, administrators, and students around social impact, we look forward to sharing best practices and connecting with other leading universities in their efforts to support the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals,” said Lei Lei, dean of Rutgers Business School.

“At the Rutgers Institute for Corporate Social Innovation, we connect academia and practice, encouraging corporations to advance society and generate economic returns,” said Noa Gafni, executive director of Rutgers Institute for Corporate Social Innovation (RICSI).
South China Morning Post
South China Morning Post
K.K. Tse’s “Hong Kong’s protests are just the tip of the iceberg: capitalism is in crisis across the globe” (September 13), is a classic misdiagnosis of the situation in Hong Kong. Capitalism is not in crisis, Hong Kong is. And the issue is not economic but political. It all began with the extradition bill and it continues to remain so.
NJTV News
NJTV News
The global uncertainty in the wake of a drone attack on Saudi Arabian oil fields that’s roiled commodities markets across the world will hit gas prices in New Jersey.

“Consumers are thinking, “Oh, here we go! Oil prices — Look at the paper! Look at the news! — oil prices are going up!” said Farrokh Langdana, a professor at Rutgers Business School. “Then we might see consumer confidence leveling off and falling. And that would not be good because that’s the one engine on the plane that’s still running well. The other engines have kind of calmed down and shut down, actually.”